Help Your Caregiver — Get Your Own Glass of Water


When you are very ill or recovering from a serious illness or surgery our caregivers (spouses, partners, friends, relatives) have a most difficult task.  Being a caregiver can be physically and emotionally draining and strange as it may seem the patient may sometimes have to offer care to the caregiver.  Care in the form of consideration and gratitude.  Remember the expression, “When mamma’s happy, everybody’s happy?”  Same goes for caregivers.

As a heart transplant patient with a wife who would do anything for me and did, I can now reflect on my recovery period and easily see the number of mistakes I made as she tried so hard to meet my every need, and take care of the house while running two businesses.  To this day I have no idea how she did it and I will be forever grateful.  My ruminations on the subject led me to write the following advice to others who may be in the same situation now or who could be in the future.

Make it easy on your caregiver if you want to do what’s best for you.

  1. Do as much for yourself as you possibly can. If your physician says you can get up and walk around do it as often as possible. Get your own glass of water.
  2. Learn your meds. Know what they look like, what they do, how often you take them and when they must be refilled and do all of it yourself.  Plan ahead for refills and find a pharmacy that will deliver to you on short notice so no one has to go running after prescriptions at the last minute.  You can do it sitting and you don’t need a caregiver to do it for you.
  3. Know your condition.  When you talk with your doctor or coordinator take notes.  It is your job to know about your health you cannot and should not depend on someone else to “remember what the doctor said.”
  4. Make your own meals but be sure they are nutritious. You either just got a new organ or you are about to get one. Don’t cause further problems by eating and drinking the wrong things.
  5. Only ask your caregiver for things you absolutely can’t do for yourself. If you can’t drive, you may need a ride or the caregiver may have to run errands for you.  If you are on medication that causes some mental confusion or fatigue your caregiver should be involved such as in dealing with legal papers, insurance etc.  But you should take over these responsibilities as soon as you possibly can.
  6.  If you have children, especially young ones, you may not be able to get involved in strenuous activities. The Children need to know this and your caregiver may have to take on some of this responsibility…for awhile.
  7.  Before making any request of your caregiver ask yourself this question, “Am I taking advantage of my caregiver by asking — is this something I can do myself?”
  8. Show gratitude and consideration. Taking care of another person can be emotionally and physically exhausting. Tell that person how grateful you are and ask what you can do to make it easier on them.  Every once in a while, get a glass of water for the caregiver.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

Also…there  is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues.  Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater  our clout with decision makers.  

Posted on January 15, 2012, in Caregivers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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