People Who Say they Can’t Quit Smoking Are Gutless Liars!


By Bob Aronson…former smoker

smoking cartoon

if that headline doesn’t get your attention I don’t know what will.

“I can’t quit smoking,” is BS.  You can quit, but you are a pansy, no guts.  You can spread that “Can’t quit” manure elsewhere.  It doesn’t work here because it’s a big lie.

Do I have your attention?

This post is aimed at smokers, whether you are just starting the habit or have smoked for a while and are thinking about quitting.  I am writing this to alert you to smoking related issues not to draw attention to myself or my condition.  I seek no sympathy nor attention.

Yes, this is a posting that encourages you to ignore the temptation to start smoking and/or to quit smoking if you already have the habit. In the interest of full disclosure let me tell you why you should read this. You should do so because I offer hope and straight talk.  No one could possibly have had a greater addiction to cigarettes than I did.  And…I know about addiction, too.  Not only did I quit smoking (1991) I also quit drinking (1982) after years as a practicing alcoholic.   I have not had a drink since.

Let me get right to the point.  Even though I quit smoking almost 25 years ago it is killing me.  When I die I would imagine that my addiction to cigarettes will be the chief cause of my demise because I have emphysema and asthma, Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD).  Had I not quit smoking when I did I would have been dead long ago.  Recently my pulmonologist told me that If I had continued to smoke,  I would have needed a lung transplant long ago.  For those of you who don’t know me I had a heart transplant in 2007 and smoking may have been a contributor to the heart failure that caused me to need that life-saving surgery.

I know how hard it is to quit smoking and I refuse to accept, “I’ve tried many times and cannot quit.”  That, my friend, is pure unadulterated BS.  You are only fooling yourself with that nonsense.  The fact of the matter is you don’t have the guts to quit.  You can’t handle a little discomfort so you light up another smoke and say, “I can’t quit.”  And again I say, “BS.”  Tough talk?  Damned right it is.  If you think the discomfort of quitting smoking is hard to handle try the discomfort a of lung cancer as an option, or maybe emphysema.

I smoked up to 4 packs a day for 37 years and I quit.  Was it easy?  Of course not!  It hurt, it was painful, I was an SOB to live with, but damnit I quit.  I used every gimmick out there to help me break the habit and finally was rescued by nicotine gum.  I probably quit smoking 3 or 4 dozen times maybe more.  You see, you don’t quit once, fail and say, “I tried, I can’t quit,” because you haven’t tried.  The way to quit smoking is to keep quitting until you quit. You never give up, you quit every day, several times a day until finally you have quit for good.

I always kept my smokes and a lighter in my shirt pocket.  Almost every day when I left home for work I would automatically reach for a cigarette and the lighter so I could get my hit of nicotine.  Finally, I got to the point where every time I reached into that pocket for the cigarettes and lighter I would pull both out and throw them out the window of the car.  I did that every day for weeks.  Later in the day I’d find myself buying another pack and a lighter and the next day I would toss them out the window. “The hell with littering,” I would say, “My life’s at stake here.”

After about a year of all this nonsense I finally had my last cigarette in January of 1991.  You see, I had just watched my father die of emphysema.  At least something good came of his death.  I was able to quit.  I was addicted to nicotine gum for two years after that and lemon drops for another year but I quit, by God, I quit.

You know why it’s so hard?  It is because you are an addict, just like any drunk or junkie.  When you hear someone say, “A cigarette tastes so good after a meal,” that’s just more BS.  The reason it feels good is because it’s been a while since your last cigarette and you are going into withdrawal.  As soon as you light up you stop the withdrawal and feel better.  It is no different than getting a hit of heroin or a good slug of booze.

From the time I was 15 years old in 1954 until 1991 (37 years) when I was 52 years old I was a smoker, a heavy smoker.  Some days when I went to work I would throw 4 packs of cigarettes in my briefcase and finish them before I retired for the night..  That’s 80 cigarettes.

There are approximately 600 ingredients in cigarettes. When burned, they create more than 7,000 chemicals. At least 69 of these chemicals are known to cause cancer, and many are poisonous as well.  Here are just a few of the chemicals in tobacco smoke, and other places they are found:

  • Acetone –nail polish remover
  • Acetic Acid –  ingredient in hair dye
  • Ammonia –household cleaner
  • Arsenic – rat poison
  • Butane – lighter fluid
  • Cadmium –battery acid
  • Carbon Monoxide car exhaust fumes
  • Formaldehyde – embalming fluid

A final note on this subject.  In 1998 I lost my wife of 35 years to lung cancer. She, too was a smoker and she died a horrible death, no one should have to suffer the way she did and the way thousands of others do every day.  Smoking is a terrible, disgusting and deadly habit.  I don’t care who you are, you have a responsibility to yourself and to those who love you to quit smoking.  You must.  After a while the urges disappear and you can live a normal life again.  You might even find that you’ll take great pride in being able to say, “I used to smoke, but I don’t anymore.”

-0-

New heart, new life, new man

Feeling better than ever at age 73

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes.

Posted on April 10, 2015, in Healthy Living and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. I agree with the criticism of the wording.

    Sometimes in order to get a person’s attention blunt and even cruel language is what’s needed. I have written at least a half dozen blogs on this subject and will continue to do so because I am appalled at the death toll from tobacco. If this post, offensive and insensitive as it is gets the attention of even one person and contributes to helping that person quit using tobacco, I will gladly assume the mantle of first class A-hole,and jerk.

    I, too, am a recovering addict so I understand everything Ash said and agree with her completely. My use of words may leave one wondering what my motivation was, but I can easily explain…it comes from love of life. Sometimes tough love is the only way to get people to do something to save their own lives. You caught me in the act Ashley…God bless you and Peter.

    Like

  2. I like this article, but I disagree with your wording. Bob, as you know, I have been in recovery one day at a time for 16 years now. When a person decides they want to quit a terrible, destructive habit, they need lots of support.
    They may succeed in their first attempt, most do not.
    They need continued support and positive words every time they attempt the cessation of aforementioned destructive behavior/addiction, not to be called “gutless” and cowardly.
    You have been blessed with the miracle of smoking cessation. This IS truly a miracle, because as most of us know, love and willpower do NOT equal recovery.
    Had I been able to “love” my addiction away while losing custody of my beautiful, trusting, loving toddler son, I would have!
    Had I been able to “will” my opiate dependence while being a health professional away before throwing this hard earned career in the trash, I would have!
    The truth is, most addicts need something simple: acceptance.
    Support of their disease, continued positive reinforcement for any attempts at recovery, and most of all, they need to not be called losers.
    As we know now after spending billions of dollars parading people who have fake voice boxes and people who are riddled with cancer in front of the TV, people “testifying” as to what they endured at the hands of their destructive addiction is NOT enough, not by half.
    Grisly images and stories does not make a person sit back and say “I AM QUITTING SMOKING TODAY!”
    PAIN, and suffering is the motivating factor in most cases.

    I am a big proponent of letting addicts suffer in detoxes and programs. This is the body’s way of saying “DO NOT DO THIS AGAIN!”
    But, sadly, now everything is about “use this patch, inhaler, fake cigarette, methadone, etc” and you will NOT have to suffer at all whilst coming off your addictive substance!

    Well, this is where I get off the criticism train- you know I RARELY disagree with you, but I guess all friends do from time to time.
    Thanks for telling your story- and I PRAY it does help someone quit- save one life- it will have been a success if it does.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: