How to Get the Most Bang for Your Prescription Medicine Buck


By Bob Aronson

cartoonI am a senior citizen, who has had a heart transplant and who also has Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).  I take a good number of prescription drugs and despite having Medicare Part D insurance I still pay thousands of dollars a year for my prescriptions.  Most of the drugs I take have been around for quite a while, but not long enough to allow the sale of generics and because there are few if any pricing restrictions, most of my meds are outrageously high priced.

One of the drugs I take is called Foradil.  It was approved by the FDA in February 2001 for the maintenance treatment of asthma and the prevention of bronchospasm in reversible obstructive airways disease..  Despite being on the market that long, it still retails for about $250.00 for a 30 day supply.  Spiriva is another COPD drug and is often taken with Foradil.  It retails for about $350.00.  I take about a dozen drugs and these two alone total over $600.00 a month. Insurance cuts that cost in half, but they are still expensive.  Because of these prices I know of many seniors and others who have to choose between eating and paying for their prescription meds.

It is an unfortunate fact of life that prescription drugs are more expensive in America than any other place in the world and as a result if you contract a serious illness like cancer you may not be able to afford the treatment that can save your life, even if you are insured.

It costs a whole lot of money to be sick in this country and a whole lot of people die — not because there iscartoon two no medicine or treatment but because they can’t afford to get well.  That strikes me as being just plain wrong.

Healthcare costs are skyrocketing, but prescription drugs lead the parade. Americans now spend a staggering $200 billion a year on them and the end is nowhere in sight.  The cost of staying alive is growing at the rate of about 12 percent a year.  It appears as though people are taking a lot more drugs than they used to and they are taking the really expensive new ones instead of older, cheaper drugs.  The reason?   Either physicians are pushing new medications too hard or, more likely, people are seeing the ads for new drugs in the media and are demanding them.  Strangely, unlike most other businesses where prices come down with time, that’s not true with drugs.  Price increases are commonplace even with the older ones and the increases aren’t one time adjustments. Often the price tag increases several times a year.

Earlier I pointed out that Americans pay more for their drugs than any other country in the world — but it isn’t just a little more…it’s a whole lot.  On average, the cost of prescription drugs in the U.S. is at least double what people in other countries pay for the same exact prescription and it some cases it is 10 times more.

A 2013 report from the International Federation of Health Plans, says Nexium, the pill commonly prescribed for acid reflux, costs U.S. patients more than $200, while Swiss citizens only pay $60 and people who live in the Netherlands pay $23. But Nexium is a drop in the bucket compared to cancer drugs. http://www.drugwatch.com/2014/10/15/americans-pay-higher-prces-prescription-drugs/

Not long ago CBS’ 60 Minutes devoted a segment to the absurdly high cost of cancer drugs. Correspondent Lesley Stahl reported that many cancer drugs cost well over $100,000 for a year’s worth of medicine. She said that in the fight against cancer, most people can expect to be on more than one drug. The bill for medications can escalate to nearly $300,000, a price tag that doesn’t include fees charged by a doctor or a   hospital. Health insurance companies – including government polices like Medicare – don’t cover the full cost of these drugs. Some policies don’t cover some of these drugs at all. cancerrBut cancer is not alone in the extreme price arena. Drugs for chronic diseases like multiple sclerosis also carry inflated prices. Prescriptions of Copaxone and Gilenya cost about $4,000 and $5,500, respectively and that amount is almost three times more than the most-expensive price in other countries.

In the case of almost every other product sold on the free market, the older a product gets the less it costs. In the case of cancer drugs in America, the inverse is actually true. Novartis developed Gleevec, one of the most popular cancer drugs, in 2001 and sold it for $28,000 a year. By 2012, its cost rose to $92,000. Despite not being a novel treatment, Novartis is allowed to hike up the price every year in the United States.

So If you are a reasonably intelligent person you will ask three questions.  1) Why do these drugs cost so much? 2) What is being done to bring the prices down? And 3) Is there help available to people who can’t afford the drugs that can keep them alive.

Let’s answer the questions one at a time.  First.  Why are drugs so expensive?  Well, if you listen to the bigbig pharma pharma companies they will tell you that the cost reflects their investment in research and development of the drugs.  They will tell you they spend millions on drugs that don’t pan out and that expense is passed on to the patient.  But are they telling the truth?  No they aren’t! Pharmaceutical companies are fond of saying Americans take the lion’s share of the R&D costs for the rest of the world – calling other countries “foreign free riders.” So, drug companies are forced to charge Americans more to recover what they don’t get from other countries.

In fact, the more disturbing truth is that companies charge what they want in the U.S., and it’s a profiteering paradise for them.  U.S. law protects these companies from free-market competition.  For example, Medicare is not allowed to negotiate prices. By law, it has to pay exactly what the drug companies charge for any drug.  In effect our lawmakers told the pharmaceutical companies that they can charge whatever they want and we (the taxpayers) will pay it. Even may insurance companies don’t negotiate or do it half-heartedly.  Companies make billions on most of these drugs, and they receive massive tax breaks for R&D, leading to inflated figures. Another huge portion of the costs are subsidized by taxpayers.

Here’s the sad part of all this R and D and the introduction of new drugs.  Only 1 in 10 of them actually provides substantial benefit over old drugs.  To add insult to injury the side effects of the new entries create the need for more drugs. And — some of these drugs have horrible complications that result in lawsuits to recover damages.

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey Health professor and policy expert Donald W. Light says, “We can find no evidence to support the widely believed claims from industry that lower prices in other industrialized countries do not allow companies to recover their R&D costs so they have to charge Americans more to make up the difference and pay for these ‘foreign free riders,’”

In contrast, governments in other countries put caps on the price of drugs and negotiate prices based on what the actual therapeutic benefit is. And Big Pharma still turns a healthy profit in other countries, despite costs being 40 percent lower than they are in the United States.

Big Pharma would have many Americans believe that it is disadvantaged by the costs of developing a new drug. The truth is, drug companies are far from impoverished. EvaluatePharma’s most recent report shows that 2013 was the biggest year since 2009 for drug approvals. These new drugs will add nearly $25 billion to Big Pharma’s coffers by 2018, and prescription drug sales will exceed one trillion dollars by 2020.

The health care industry as a whole has more than enough money, with billions left to continue pursuing its interests in Washington.

Big Pharma Spends More on Lobbying Than Anyone

campaign contributionsSince 1998, the industry spent more than $5 billion on lobbying in Washington, according to the Center for Responsive Politics. To put that in context, that’s more than the $1.53 billion spent by the defense industry and more than the $1.3 billion forked out by Big Oil.

From 1998 to 2013, Big Pharma spent nearly $2.7 billion on lobbying expenses — more than any other industry and 42 percent more than the second highest paying industry: insurance. And since 1990, individuals, lobbyists and political action committees affiliated with the industry have doled out $150 million in campaign contributions.

The world’s 11 largest drug companies made a net profit of $711.4 billion from 2003 to 2012. Six of these companies are headquartered in the United Sates: Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer, Abbot Laboratories, Merck, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Eli Lilly. In 2012 alone, the top 11 companies earned nearly $85 billion in net profits. According to IMS Health, a worldwide leader in health care research, the global market for pharmaceuticals is expected to top $1 trillion in sales by 2014.http://www.drugwatch.com/manufacturer/

But the large amount of cash Big Pharma bestows on government representatives and regulatory bodies is small when compared with the billions it spends each year on direct-to-consumer advertising. In 2012, theadvertising industry invested nearly $3.5 billion into marketing drugs on the Internet, TV, radio and other outlets. The United States is one of only two countries in the world whose governments allow prescription drugs to be advertised on TV (the other is New Zealand).

A single manufacturer, Boehringer Ingelheim, spent $464 million advertising its blood thinner Pradaxa in 2011. The following year, the drug passed the $1 billion sales mark. The money in this business appears to be well-spent.

No sane person can object to a company making a profit, it’s part of the American way, but the drug industry’s profits are excessive.  We paysignificantly more than any other country for the exact same drugs. Per capita drug spending in the U.S. is about 40 percent higher than Canada, 75 percent greater than in Japan and nearly triple the amount spent in Denmark.

So you might ask, “What can I do to get the lowest possible price for my  prescriptions?”  Well, there are a few things.  You can shop for the best price and because of the internet that’s become a whole lot easier.  You can look up a specific drug and find the best price at a pharmacy near you.  Here are two resources, I’m sure you can find a lot more https://www.lowestmed.com/Search#/  or http://www.goodrx.com/ All; you pharmacieshave to do is type in the drug you need and your zip code and it will find the price of that drug in pharmacies near you.

Transplant recipients might be interested in the cost of anti-rejection drugs.  The price is hard to stomach but easy to find.  In my zip code 32244 100 Mg Cyclosporine capsules range jn price from $526.00 at Wal Mart to $584 at Target.  If you are a heart pateint and take Carvedilol in my neighborhood it ranges from $4.00 at WalMart to $9.54 at Kmart . Lisinopril also has a wide range.  At the Publix Supermarket pharmacy near me it is FREE…that’s right FREE.  But at CVS it is $12.00.  Those price variations might make it worth a little longer drive to get a better bargain.

You can also get help with coupons which are an obvious choice to save money when grocery or clothes shopping, but they’re often overlooked as a way to cut costs of over-the-counter and prescription drugs.  Manufactures frequently offer one time and repeat coupons that can save consumers hundreds of dollars on their medicines.  “For our family it has been incredibly effective [in saving money] for a number of regular prescriptions,” says Stephanie Nelson, founder of the coupon website CouponMom.com.

The costs of prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications have been steadily rising and patients facing tight budgets are often forced to make hard decisions when it comes to what they can afford.

The savings vary by manufacturer, but according to Nelson, many companies offer discounts at each prescription refill while others offer discount cards that take $20 off co-pays. Others offer one-time coupons to cover the first use of a drug.

Consumer Reports Magazine says that there are other ways to save money, too.  Whichever drugstore or pharmacy you use, choosing generics over brand-name drugs will save you money. Talk to your doctor, who may be able to prescribe lower-cost alternatives in the same class of drug. In addition, follow these tips.

  1. Request the lowest price.Our analysis showed that shoppers didn’t always receive the lowest couponavailable price when they called the pharmacy. Sometimes they were given a discounted price, and other times they were quoted the list price. Be sure to explain—whether you have insurance or not—that you want the lowest possible price. Our shoppers found that student and senior discounts may also apply, but again, you have to ask.
  2. Leave the city.Grocery-store pharmacies and independent drugstores sometimes charge higher prices in urban areas than in rural areas. For example, our shoppers found that for a 30-day supply of generic Actos, an independent pharmacy in the city of Raleigh, N.C., charged $203. A store in a rural area of the state sold it for $37.
  3. Get a refill for 90 days, not 30 days.Most pharmacies offer discounts on a three-month supply.
  4. Consider paying retail.At Costco, the drugstore websites, and a few independents, the retail prices were lower for certain drugs than many insurance copays.
  5. Look for additional discounts.All chain and big-box drugstores offer discount generic-drug programs, with some selling hundreds of generic drugs for $4 a month or $10 for a three-month supply. Other programs require you to join to get the discount. (Restrictions apply and certain programs charge annual fees.)
  6. Consumer Reports goes on to say that “although the low costs we found at a few stores could entice you to get your prescriptions filled at multiple pharmacies based only on price, our medical consultants say it’s best to use a single pharmacy. That keeps all of the drugs you take in one system, which can help you avoid dangerous drug interactions.”

Finally, what do you do if you’ve done the shopping, used coupons, followed all of the Consumer Report Tips and are still unable to pay for your prescriptions.  Well, there is some limited assistance. Here are some resources.

  1. http://www.medicare.gov/pharmaceutical-assistance-program/

2.http://www2.nami.org/Content/ContentGroups/Helpline1/Prescription_Drug_Patient_Assistance_Programs.htm

  1. http://healthfinder.gov/rxdrug

-0-

bob 2Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,200 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes.

Posted on July 14, 2015, in Healthy Living and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: