From the Bottom of My Donor’s Heart. My 20 Year Transplant Journey


heart full of love

Introduction

Overall my transplant has been a very positive experience, but that does not suggest that there weren’t some difficulties and challenges along the way. There were several and they were discouraging, but we kept forging ahead because the alternative was much worse. Now some 20 years post diagnosis. I am alive, I am enjoying life and I am the most grateful recipient on earth. Despite all the setbacks, the bad moments, the complications, I would not hesitate to make the same decision all over again. Thank you Mayo, donor family, my wife and family and the many friends I had and have collected since I got a new heart.

This is an accurate although abbreviated record of my journey. Yours may be totally different and likely will be. I have posted it because of a good many requests to do so. I hope it is helpful to someone. I also hope you will notice that I found some of the experience to be downright funny and I included them because seeing the humor in life’s challenges is important to your recovery. Don’t ever lose your sense of humor; in fact you should aggressively look for it in every situation. It will make your life so much easier to live.

Bob Aronson, heart recipient August 21, 2007 Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida.

 

The Beginning. An Earthquake Swallows You Whole

Getting an organ transplant is an experience that few ever have. From the time you first learn that you need one, until a good while after you have one, the ride is not unlike the wildest, highest, steepest, fastest, scariest roller earthquakecoaster ride you can imagine. It is like standing in the street when an earthquake hits and the fissure in the pavement runs right between your feet. You get the same feeling you did in that recurring nightmare where no matter how fast you run, your legs feel like rubber and you keep falling, but each time you do it is harder to get up and that something that is chasing you is getting closer. You know you are going to die.

Emotions can range from terror, to giddiness, to depression, anxiety, guilt, anger and every other imaginable high, low or even fantasy. An organ transplant will introduce you to feelings you did not know you had and to realities you did not know existed. Most importantly it will allow you to see your own humanity; your strengths, weaknesses vulnerabilities, fears and inadequacies. In other words, you will get to know a side of yourself that you didn’t know existed.

All of us know that someday we will cease to exist, but no one likes talking if something happensabout it. Insurance companies like to say, “If something happens to you,” and we all know they don’t mean winning the lottery or getting your very own magic Genii who will pop out of a jar and grant you anything you want. “If something happens to you” means not if, but when you die. It means dead, lifeless, no heartbeat, no breathing, no pulse – DEAD!

When you are told that an organ is failing, you are being told that the last option available to keep you alive is a transplant. You are dying. That is information with which it is hard to come to grips, and those of us who have had transplants have all heard that message loud and clear, it is inevitable. It is a sad fact, but everyone on the transplant list is dying.

I’m sure the death message is never delivered in the same manner twice because the circumstances that lead up to it are all different. The very first recognition that something is wrong is usually met with disbelief. “It’s probably nothing, maybe a false positive, it can’t be organ failure.”

In my case it was in mid-1995 when I left the office late one night after a long day. I’m an asthmatic and I had struggled for air all day. I could hardly wait it for it to end but I had a client until 9 PM. When she left, I waited until the elevator doors closed, turned out the lights, locked the door and took an elevator down six floors to the parking ramp. I had arrived at the office late in the day because of meeting and had to park at the very back of the ramp, a good block from the elevator. Most of the cars were gone now and there wasn’t a living, breathing soul to be seen. I could see my car in the distance, but it may as well have been in the next county. My breathing was so labored I doubted I could make it that far, but I had to try.

I am one of those guys who makes a decision and never looks back, so I forged ahead. I was going to make it to my car no matter what. I thought that if I walked slowly I man down in dark rampwouldn’t use as much air so that’s what I did, but breathing was getting more and more difficult and my rescue inhaler seemed to have no effect. I chalked it up to a defective device and pushed on while carrying a full briefcase. I leaned on cars, support columns and sign posts, but stopped often and fell twice when my legs gave way under me.

By the time I got to my car my suit pants were torn from falling, my hands were scraped and bloodied from using them to break my falls and I was soaking wet from perspiration. With great effort I made it into the car, turned on the AC and just sat there hoping the rest would restore my ability to breathe. It didn’t. I called home to alert my wife that I was in distress and would pick her up on the way to a nearby community hospital ER. She said I should go to a bigger hospital, but I knew the bigger facility would be crowded and the wait would be a long one so we went to the small one.  She was right and i was wrong. here’s what happened.

It was a small hospital in Hastings,Minnesota and there were no patients waiting in the ER lobby emergency entrancewhen I stumbled to the desk and gasped, “I’m having an asthma attack and need a shot of epinephrine,” and collapsed on a chair next to the nurse.

She took my vitals, listened to my chest, looked at my eyes and fingernails, poked around my ankles and said, “This is no asthma attack.” Somehow she alerted a crash team which appeared in microseconds. They brought with them a gurney upon which they cekgarefully placed me and removed my tie, shirt and t-shirt while wheeling me into an ER exam cubicle. Then, someone else came along and stuck some leads on my chest, sides, legs and arms and wired me to a machine. Another person started an IV. A portable X-ray machine materialized, someone gave me a nitroglycerine pill to place under my tongue but still no shot of epinephrine and I was getting angry. I knew what to do. “Why didn’t they know? I wondered”

A doctor appeared, examined me and ignored my repeated requests for epinephrine. Finally he said, “Mr. Aronson this is not an asthma attack, even though you think it is. It’s your heart.” He left the room to have a conversation in the hall with a couple of other people and then returned to say, “Mr. Aronson, we have determined that your condition could best be handled by a racing ambulancehospital that has cardiologists on duty and specializes in situations just like this. We are sending you there by ambulance so you will get the best and most immediate care possible,” and they wheeled me out to my ride.

Too much was happening too fast. I was totally confused. “This is asthma, for heaven’s sake,” I thought. I just couldn’t wrap my mind around this heart stuff. I was 56 years old and thought I was in very good health. I didn’t drink or smoke and was in fairly good physical condition. united hospitalI just couldn’t figure out why they thought it was my heart when I knew it was asthma. The ride to United Hospital in St. Paul, Minnesota took about 20 minutes, and I was rushed into their heart unit. More wires, more machines, more activity, blood drawn, questions asked and injections given.

Another technician appeared with an echocardiogram machine. He placed more leads on my body, some cold gel and began moving a wand around the left side of my chest. In the meantime my breathing was improving.

I could see my heart on the echo monitor and hear the “gulp, swish, swish, gechogramulp” of the machine. All the while the medical team was explaining every detail of what they were doing and I heard none of it. “It’s an asthma attack,” I kept thinking. And then I lost consciousness.

I awakened the next morning in a hospital room with my family surrounding me. Everyone was solemn and one of my daughters was crying. A man walked in, he looked like he just stepped off the cover of Gentleman’s Quarterly. “I’m Dr. Thomas Johnson, a cardiologist,” he said. “It appears as though you have a very serious heart condition called Cardiomyopathy. We are going to run some further tests, but you may need a heart transplant.”

I thought, “Boy, this guy doesn’t mince words – a heart transplant? I vaguely remembered being on the air and reporting on the story when Dr. Christian Barnaard performed the first ever in 1967 in a South African hospital. I remember thinking, “Wow, what a development. It will help a whole lot of people someday,” never considering for a moment that I might be one of them. The diagnosis was official now, I had Idiopathic, Dilated Cardiomyopathy. That means I had heart failure from no apparent cause.

It all came together at that moment. The great truth that I had continually denied and avoided was now perfectly clear. The feeling was like that you experience when a monstrous thunder clap or earthquake rattles your bones. It was like lightning bolts flashed out of the clouds, thunder rumbled louder than I could bear and the realization that asthma had nothing to do with my condition that shook my foundation. I was in serious trouble. I felt a mixture of shock, anger, terror, doubt and disbelief. That was my introduction to a process that would take 12 more years before I got a new heart.

The Disease Progresses

A measure of the health of your heart is its ejection fraction (EF). It is how ejection fraction 2much blood is pumped out of the heart with each beat. On average we pump out about 60-70 percent. My EF was 25. When it gets too low that means that the heart has to grow larger to hold the retained blood, but it’s a gradual process. For a long while I felt OK. I went about my work and with the help of medication performed as I always had. I was a communication consultant helping business executives with presentations, testimony, personal communication and media interviews, and was always upbeat and energetic. Often I was hired as a keynote speaker at conventions. I never stood behind a lectern, but rather walked around the stage, invading people’s space and getting them involved. Slowly that became harder to do.

In 1996, a year later, I started to feel a little fatigue and while still energetic I had lost a step or two, but it was barely noticeable. That same year Avis, my wife of 33 years was diagnosed with lung cancer. She fought hard and for a while it looked like she had it beat but in 1998 she succumbed to that horrible disease and I went through the motions of living. My fear of the slow disability that would be overtaking me was exacerbated by the grief I felt over losing Avis. Being alone after 35 years of marriage is almost unbearable. She was special and losing her left a very large void in my heart and my life.

I stumbled on in a continually weakening condition until 2000 when I met and married my current wife Robin. I told her about my condition and the fact that there were not enough donor organs for the number of patients who needed them, but she was undaunted and married me anyway. As it turned out she always had more faith than I did that I would get a heart and be just fine, but I was now about five years post diagnosis and my EF had dipped to 20 and I lost another step or two. As I walked the stage in my presentations I started to become more breathless so I contracted my movement circle. It was about this same time when I fainted while driving into a parking place. That development caused my physicians to implant a defibrillator in my chest to guard me against sudden cardiac arrest.

At 9 years my EF was between 15 and 20 and it had become very difficult to be as active as I had been so I made sure that I had a bar stool when I spoke that would be placed about center stage between the lectern and the edge. I could still leave the lectern and give the image of energy but I could kind of lean on that stool. Obviously the heart failure was getting worse, but not bad enough to put me on a transplant list.

Finally at 11 years with an EF of 10 to 15 I quit doing keynote speeches and only accepted small group coaching sessions where I stood on occasion but mostly sat on a stool at the front of the room, and then one day, I couldn’t muster the energy to get through a session unless I sat in a chair.

It was time. We decided to retire and move from Minneapolis, Minnesota to Jacksonville, Florida for two reasons. One being that it was my wife’s Mayo jaxhometown and her family was there and the second was that one of three Mayo Clinics was located there. I learned they had a phenomenal record of success in getting organs and in the survival rates of transplant recipients.

I made the necessary appointments at Mayo and went through a battery of tests for several days. Finally I was told that my case would be presented to the hospital transplant committee for approval to be placed in the national transplant list. Sure enough I was approved and listed and promptly forgot about it. Everything I had read suggested that people on the list waited a long time and that many never got an organ. I was of the belief that at age 68 I was probably too old and not sick enough. After all I was up and around and not even hospitalized.

By now my EF was down to 10 and my heart was getting seriously enlarged. I was on my second implanted defibrillator and had trouble walking from the den to the bathroom without stopping to rest. Then one morning the phone rang, I answered and confirmed my identity and my transplant cardiologist from Mayo said, “I may have a heart for you.”

I could not believe my ears. I had only been listed 13 days earlier.

“Pack a bag and come to the hospital,” Dr. Hosenpud said, “and we’ll get things underway.” In my mind “pack a bag” meant, “Get your butt over here right away, break the speed limit, we’re all waiting for you, hurry, hurry, hurry.”

I told Robin about the call and we rushed out of the house to make the 45 minute cross town drive to Mayo. It only took 30 minutes. For me the world at this point was moving at near the speed of light. My always composed and realistic wife Robin had no delusions. She expected Mayo to be as reserved and professional as they always were. My mind was simply not that organized. I perceived us screeching to a stop at the hospital where a team of the world’s greatest physicians, nurses and technicians would be in medical staff waitingthe lobby waiting for us. My mind’s eye saw us running into the hospital surrounded by people in surgical garb and lab coats who were all barking orders while the hospital PA system was calling for more doctors, nurses and technicians. I fully expected the PA system to be saying, “He’s here; the guy who is getting a new heart is here.” I envisioned being thrown on a gurney, stripped of my clothing and rolled at high speed to an operating room where the finest doctors on the planet were assembled next to an ice-covered beating heart in a stainless steel pan.

Tben caseyhe Doctors looked like Ben Casey Dr. Zorba and Patricia Neal (all  stars of the past).The scenario in my mind called for absolute pandemonium. I was patricia nealthat excited so they must be, too. I needed pandemonium — to have it meant this event was the show of shows, the biggest medical story of the century.

I got anything but. I walked in, stood in a very orderly line and when I was waved forward said to the receptionist, “I’m Bob Aronson and I’ve just been called by Dr. Hosenpud to come in for a heart transplant. “Ok,” I mayo receptionICUthought. “Cue the marching band and a frenzied atmosphere.” But nothing of the sort happened.

She looked up at me and smiled, looked down at her computer screen and said, “Someone will be out to get you shortly, Mr. Aronson, please have a seat.” There were scores of people in the waiting room and not a single one looked up when I entered. They all sat in perfect silence waiting their turn and ignoring my big event. For all I knew every one of them was here for a transplant as well.

“Have a seat?” I thought. “Don’t they know why I’ m here, who I am? For God’s sake there’s a heart on ice in there beating away, waiting for me and she wants me to sit?” I had considered this day often and each time I did there was pandemonium. I wanted pandemonium, I deserved pandemonium, I needed pandemonium, I craved it, but alas it never happened.

A very nice woman came out in about fifteen minutes and quietly said, “Come with me, Mr. Aronson,” and we slowly, quietly walked behind the reception desk into the surgical area, where I got on a gurney under my own power, put on a gown and was surrounded by very pleasant, highly professional staff who proceeded to quietly and efficiently “prep” me for the surgery.

Finally they wheeled me to a surgical suite where the strains of Beethoven could be heard on the speaker system as the anesthesiologist told me what his role was and about the anesthesia I would be getting. Then, he said he would give me something to “relax” me. It sure did.

I awakened in recovery the next day to the sound of Robin saying, “You have a new heart and you’re doing well.”

Recovery. The Days After

When I awakened again, I didn’t know where I was. I felt like I was duct taped to the bed. My head hurt. I was nauseous and confused. I vaguely remember several doctors entering the room.cardiac icu They asked about pain levels and said they were going to remove my dressings. One of them leaned over me crossed his arms so his right hand was on my right shoulder and his left on my left shoulder, Then there was the sound made by industrial strength Velcro makes when being torn apart rapidly–“Riiiiiiip” and he said, “You Ok?” I don’t remember my response because I lost consciousness again.

My next awakening was in Cardiac Intensive care. I think I was alone in my own cubicle. There was a nurse there and I was so thirsty my mouth felt like hot sandpaper. I asked for water. The nurse said, “You can have ice chips once an hour and she handed me a glass of them.

They lasted as long as they would had you poured them on a downtown Miami sidewalk at noon in the middle of August and I was still thirsty. cup of iceMore,” I said.

“No,” she said, “Not for another hour.”

I begged and pleaded to no avail. So I focused on the wall clock. “57 minutes to go.” It was the longest 57 minutes of my life, but right on schedule she was there with the small glass of ice chips. I was still parched and the chips gave only momentary relief, so I begged again, but failed to penetrate her compassion shield. I think I called her “an ice Nazi.” She didn’t laugh, but it didn’t sway her either. I don’t know how long that went on, but she never relented and I will always remember being the thirstiest I have ever been.

I do not recall how long I was in ICU, but I do remember being moved to my own private room. When I entered the hospital I was suffering from horrible heartburn and I was still bothered by it after surgery so I asked them to place me in the recliner chair in the room. They did and I settled in for the duration. They never cured the heartburn so I never got in bed. I’m probably one of the few transplant patients who spent all my time in the hospital room, some 9 days, without ever getting into bed. The housekeeping staff seemed to like that. One less bed to change.

My Mayo Transplant was done in St. Luke’s Hospital in Jacksonville, Florida while the Mayo hospital was being constructed. St. Luke’s was nice, with an Rasputenincredible, wonderful staff, but it was old. In my room there were two chairs, one was the recliner in which I sat. I think it was built in 1915 in Tsarist Russia for use on the enemies of the “Mad Monk” Grigori Rasputin. You had to be a contortionist to adjust the recline angle of the chair and no one who has had their chest cavity carved open has that ability.

That chair was bad enough, but the other one was clearly meant as an alternative to water boarding. It was a straight backed heavy oak, ladder-back chair. It was designed to make people confess, not to be comfortable and it was what Robin had to sit on, day after day. I don’t know what happened to it since then, but I would bet it is indestructible, probably won’t even burn.

During my stay there, I was constantly wheeled to different tests including heart biopsies, more echograms, X-ray’s and other imaging, pulmonary exams and treatments and meds adjustments. I was weak, still had heartburn, was not eating very much and generally didn’t feel real good, but finally was sent home with instructions on how to recover there.

Post-transplant depression is quite common for a host of reasons, one in particular is guilt. It is not unusual for a transplant recipient to feel terrible because “someone had to die, in order that I could live.” That statement supposes that the organ recipient bears some responsibility for the death of the donor. When you consider it, the thought is unreal and illogical. While I understand that sentiment I respectfully disagree. Here’s my take on the issue. No one HAD to die and when they did, it was not so you could live. That person’s life had ended. They died sadly, because it was their time to go. Prior to that he or she voluntarily signed up to be an organ donor. Then, for whatever reason they died. When they did UNOS (The United Network for Organ Sharing) began a search to look for a match for the organs of the deceased person. You are a number on their list; they don’t have your name.

No one HAD to die so you could get a transplant, but someone did die and you were chosen to get the organ. It’s not as though your donor was called in to the central office and told, “Hey George, today is your turn, We need your heart, kidneys and pancreas. We’ll be putting you down at 3 PM so say your goodbyes.” It just doesn’t work that way. George, for whatever reason, lost his life that day and because he was a generous, compassionate person he had arranged for someone to get his organs upon his passing. Someone, anyone. It is a gift to whoever needs it most. Your donor made that decision, no one else. Be grateful, yes, but guilt has no place in the equation. you are not responsible for your donor’s death.

I seemed to be doing better at home until I awakened one morning with a terrible heaviness in my chest. Breathing was difficult and I was coughing. A call to my transplant coordinator resulted in being instructed to go to the Emergency Room right away. It wasn’t long after I arrived and was examined that I was informed that I had pneumonia and the pulmonologist said he was very worried about my lungs. After nine more days in the hospital and some heavy duty therapy I began to recover and was released. deprressionWhen I got home I retreated to the den in my favorite recliner, turned on the TV and sunk into terrible depression, a condition that didn’t end soon or easily.

 

Like all transplant patients I was not allowed to drive for a while so at least twice a week Robin had to drive me to Mayo for checkups and treatments. I went because I had to. There was no joy in any of it including the cardiac rehab program, which was well-run, but well beyond my ability to enjoy. This was my lowest point ever. I have since learned that post-transplant depression is very common and yes, I was treated for it, but it is the kind of illness that doesn’t respond immediately to treatment, so I stayed in that state for several months while we experimented with anti-depressants.

At the same time, I was stricken with incredible shoulder, neck, arm and wrist pain. I knew I had the beginnings of osteoarthritis, but I didn’t know it could be this painful. Additionally, I was told that when they perform a heart transplant your arms are placed over your head at a strange angle so the surgeon has complete access to the chest cavity. It is not unusual, I’m told, for some patients to suffer shoulder pain as a result. I was one of those patients. For weeks I suffered from pain so horrible I could not sleep or eat and while the Mayo docs made every effort to help, it took time to find the appropriate method of addressing it. They finally did, but that episode had me descend into even greater depths of depression.

Slowly, very slowly I regained my appetite, my mood brightened and the pain lifted, but it was almost a two year ordeal in which I went from 225 pounds to 150, a 75 pound loss due to having no interest in food and a stomach that wouldn’t keep much down. I think I lived on puddings, gelatins and soft fruits. The only thing that kept me going was a newfound interest called Social Media.

Robin was my salvation in all of this. She not only took care of me at home, but made sure I made all my medical  appointments, had the right meds and ran two businesses out of our home at the same time. She is steady as a rock, never panics and is always up-beat and encouraging. Being a caregiver is very hard work. She did it and to some degree still does it without complaint. I am a most fortunate man. I love her with a special intensity and am blessed that she feels the same about me. She is a fantastic woman.

facebook wordpress
In November of 2007, two months after my transplant I got a call from Lee Aase the social media guru for Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. I knew Lee professionally and was flattered when he called to ask if I’d be interested in starting a Facebook group and a blog. I said, “Huh,” and “huh.” I had no idea what either were. Lee is a patient man and took the time to give me a crash course and that’s when today’s over 4,200 member Facebook group Organ transplant Initiative was founded along with Bob’s Newheart blogs. Lee came up with the Newheart name which I still think is mighty clever.

The miracle of the social media for me is that it gave me some new responsibilities, which I desperately needed. My nature is such that if I take on a task I don’t know how to give it anything but my very best. OTI and the Newheart blogs gave me a new reason to get up in the morning. Each day I had something new to do, blogs to write, topics to introduce on Facebook and something to keep my mind off of my miseries. Lee’s call may have saved my sanity.

The Facebook group grew rapidly and the members were incredibly supportive of one another and of me. Since I started blogging I have posted over 260 columns on topics around transplantation/donation and related issues, which is just about any medical story. While some of them were provided by guest bloggers I researched and wrote about 90 percent of them.

Robin is an artist and we sell her colorful anodized aluminum and polymer clay jewelry at art fairs around the east and Midwest and we travel to those sRobin and dogshows with our two dogs in our RV to the tune of about 20,000 miles a year. We love the life, enjoy what we do and have no plans to quit anytime soon.

Her art business required furnishings for her trobin's boothent and because I have always liked doing woodwork I began to build a shop and make shelving, pedestals, picture frames, tables and wooden jewelry boxes. I’m no expert woodworker, but it is a hobby I really enjoy and intend to keep doing it as long as I can. I am busier today than I was when I was working, but now I answer to no one but I and work only on things that give me great satisfaction.

I am convinced that the road to good health and happiness is made easier if you can stay busy doing things you love doing.

Readers – the only advice I can give you is this. Never give up, never. Be confident of a bright future because if you think otherwise you may be paving your own road to hell. Find something you really like doing, enjoy your new life, love your friends and loved ones with every ounce of your soul and as Spock said, “Live long and prosper.” You’re worth it and you deserve it!

-0-

bobBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,200 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes. Then, when registered, tell your family about your decision so there is no confusion when the time comes.

 

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About Bob Aronson

Bob Aronson is a former journalist, a Minnesota Governor's Press Secretary and talk show host. For nearly a quarter of a century, he led the Aronson Partnership, a Minnesota-based communications consultancy that prepared corporate and government executives for crisis situations, regulatory testimony, media interviews and Presentations. Among his clients were all three U.S. Mayo Clinic locations, 3M, general Mills, CH2M Hill, the U.S. Department of Energy and scores more. In 2007 bob had a heart transplant after suffering from idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy for 12 years. Shortly after he got his new heart he founded the now 4,300 member Facebook support group, Organ Transplant Initiative. At the same time, he established the Bob's Newheart blog where he has posted nearly 300 columns on organ donation, transplantation and other health related issues. The Viewpoint blog was started in late 2016 and bears the name of the Radio Talk show Bob did from 1966 until 1974, when he resigned to become Minnesota Governor Rudy Perpich first Press secretary. Bob and his artist wife Robin, live in Jacksonville, Florida with their two dogs, Reilly and Ziggy. Bob is also a woodworker and makes all of the furnishings for Robin's art festival booth. He also makes one of a kind jewelry or "memories" boxes that he donates to select transplant patients, caregivers, donor families and others who have somehow contributed to making life easier for the ill, the elderly and the less fortunate. Bob is in the final stages of editing two full-length novels that will be available on Kindle when ready for release sometime in early 2017. One is a sci fi novel about an amazing discovery near Roswell, New Mexico and you will be surprised to find it has nothing to do with the Roswell story everyone knows. It features a woman scientist who investigates impact craters for the U.S. Department of the Interior, Dr. Rita Sylvester and her female student intern. The other book is a political thriller that introduces a new hero to the genre, Fargo Dennison.

Posted on October 12, 2015, in Organ and tissue transplants and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

  1. A fantastic story about a tremendous journey. I have been a donor since Texas first made that possible on the DL — actually before via document which, of course, would usually be useless. While some prospective recipients might be put off by the travails you endured, I would hope that all will take heart (pun intended) in the appearance of light at the end of your tunnel — and it wasn’t St. Peter. Thanks for sharing that.

    Like

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