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We Are Killing Our Own Organs — 30 Worst Foods, 100 Best.


The key to solving the shortage of transplantable organs is to eliminate the demand for them.

“We have met the enemy and he is us,” has become a trite expression but that doesn’t make it any less true.  We are our own worst enemies.   The numbers are staggering.  We are killing ourselves in four ways:

  1. We drink too much alcohol
  2. We smoke too much
  3. We eat too much of the wrong food

Let’s look at he facts.

  1. 22.5% are current smokers, resulting in significant health problems and associated costs.
  2. 8.5% of Americans abuse alcohol or are alcohol dependent,.
  3.  Approximately 30.4% of adults in the United States are obese,

The estimated annual medical expenditures associated with alcohol abuse total $26.3 billion.  Organs most commonly affected are the lungs, kidneys, pancreas, heart and liver.

Second,  smoking.  Medical costs caused by cigarette smoking exceed $75 billion a year.  According to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body and causes many diseasesCigarette smoking remains the single most-common preventable cause of death in the United States,  The adverse health effects from cigarette smoking account for more than 440,000 deaths, or nearly one of every five deaths, each year in the United States.

Finally obesity combined with eating the wrong foods.  A good number of these people experience some organ failure.  The direct medical costs for obesity have been approximated at $51.6 billion per year. The organs most often affected are the heart, kidneys and pacnreas.   http://abcnews.go.com/Health/PictureOfHealth/story?id=4286176&page=1

This blog is about preventing organ failure  and one way to do that is to be a little more careful about how much we eat and what we decide to consume.   There are two lists here, 1) the worst foods and 2) the best foods.

Top 30 Worst Foods in America (from Food Matters

Note from Bob’s Newheart.  While Food Matters lists 30 I am only listing ten.  You can click on their link for the rest of the story)

Today’s food marketers have loaded many of their offerings with so much fat, sugar, and sodium that eating any of the foods in this article on a daily basis could destroy all your hard work and best intentions of eating healthy. Beware! This list is brought to you by Eat This Not That and Men’s Health. http://foodmatters.tv/articles-1/the-30-worst-foods-in-america-beware

1. Worst Meal in America

Carl’s Jr. Six Dollar Guacamole Bacon Burger with Medium Natural Cut Fries and 32-oz Coke

1,810 calories – 92 g fat (29.5 g saturated, 2 g trans) – 3,450 mg sodium

Of all the gut-growing, heart-threatening, life-shortening burgers in the drive-thru world, there is none whose damage to your general well-being is as potentially catastrophic as this. A bit of perspective is in order: This meal has the caloric equivalent of 9 Krispy Kreme Original Glazed doughnuts, the saturated fat equivalent of 30 strips of bacon, and the salt equivalent of 10 large orders of McDonald’s French fries!

2. Worst Drink

Baskin-Robbins Large Chocolate Oreo Shake

2,600 calories – 135 g fat (59 g saturated, 2.5 g trans) – 1,700 mg sodium – 263 g sugars

We didn’t think anything could be worse than Baskin-Robbins’ 2008 bombshell, the Heath Bar Shake. After all, it had more sugar (266 grams) than 20 bowls of Froot Loops, more calories (2,310) than 11 actual Heath Bars, and more ingredients (73) than you’ll find in most chemistry sets. Yet the folks at Baskin-Robbins have shown that when it comes to making America fat, they’re always up to the challenge. The large Chocolate Oreo Shake is soiled with more than a day’s worth of calories and 3 days’ worth of saturated fat. Worst of all, it takes less than 10 minutes to sip through a straw.

3. Worst Ribs

Outback Steakhouse Baby Back Ribs

2,580 calories

Let’s be honest: Ribs are rarely served alone on a plate. When you add a sweet potato and Outback’s Classic Wedge Salad, this meal is a 3,460-calorie blowout. (Consider that it takes only 3,500 calories to add a pound of fat to your body. Better plan for a very, very long “walkabout” when this meal is over!)

4. Worst Pizza
Uno Chicago Grill Classic Deep Dish Individual Pizza

2,310 calories – 165 g fat (54 g saturated) – 4,920 mg sodium – 120 g carbs

The problem with deep dish pizza (which Uno’s knows a thing or two about, since they invented it back in 1943) is not just the extra empty calories and carbs from the crust, it’s that the thick doughy base provides the structural integrity to house extra heaps of cheese, sauce, and greasy toppings. The result is an individual pizza with more calories than you should eat in a day and more sodium than you would find in 27 small bags of Lays Potato Chips. Oh, did we mention it has nearly 3 days’ worth of saturated fat, too? The key to success at Uno’s lies in their flatbread pizza.

5. Worst Mexican Dish


Chili’s Fajita Quesadillas Beef with Rice and Beans, 4 Flour Tortillas, and Condiments

2,240 calories – 92 g fat (43.5 g saturated) – 6,390 mg sodium – 253 g carbs

Since when has it ever been a smart idea to combine 2 already calorie- and sodium-packed dishes into one monstrous meal? This confounding creation delivers nearly a dozen Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnuts worth of calories, the sodium equivalent of 194 saltine crackers, and the saturated fat equivalent of 44 strips of bacon. Check please.

6. Worst Seafood Dish


Romano’s Macaroni Grill Parmesan Crusted Sole

2,190 calories – 141 g fat (58 g saturated) – 2,980 mg sodium – 145 g carbs

Fish is normally a safe bet, but this entrée proves that it’s all in the preparation. If you fry said fish in a shell of cheese, be prepared to pay the consequences. Here that means meeting your daily calorie, fat, saturated fat, and sodium intake in one sitting.

7. Worst Chinese Dish

P.F. Chang’s Combo Lo Mein

1,968 calories – 96 g fat (12 g saturated) – 5,860 mg sodium

Lo mein is normally looked at as a side dish, a harmless pile of noodles to pad your plate of orange chicken or broccoli beef. This heaping portion (to be fair, Chang’s does suggest diners share an order) comes spiked with chicken, shrimp, beef, and pork, not to mention an Exxon Valdez-size slick of oil. The damage? A day’s worth of calories, 1 ½ days’ worth of fat, and 2 ½ days’ worth of sodium. No meat-based dish beats out the strip.

8. Worst Appetizer
On the Border Firecracker Stuffed Jalapenos with Chili con Queso

1,950 calories – 134 g fat (36 g saturated) – 6,540 mg sodium

Appetizers are the most problematic area of most chain-restaurant menus. That’s because they’re disproportionately reliant on the type of cheesy, greasy ingredients that catch hungry diners’ eyes when they’re most vulnerable—right when they sit down. Seek out lean protein options like grilled shrimp skewers or ahi tuna when available; if not, simple is best—like chips and salsa.

9. Worst Burger


Chili’s Smokehouse Bacon Triple Cheese Big Mouth Burger with Jalapeno Ranch Dressing

1,901 calories – 138 g fat (47 g saturated) – 4,201 mg sodium

Any burger whose name is 21 syllables long is bound to spell trouble for your waistline. This burger packs almost an entire day’s worth of calories and 2 ½ days’ worth of fat. Chili’s burger menu rivals Ruby Tuesday’s for the worst in America, so you’re better off with one of their reasonable Fajita Pitas to silence your hunger.

10. Worst Sandwich
Quizno’s Large Tuna Melt

1,760 calories – 133 g fat (26 g saturated, 1.5 g trans) – 2,120 mg sodium

In almost all other forms, tuna is a nutritional superstar, so how did it end up as the headliner for America’s Worst Sandwich? Blame an absurdly heavy hand with the mayo the tuna is mixed with, along with Quiznos’ larger-than-life portion sizes. Even though they’ve managed to trim this melt down from the original 2,000-plus calorie mark when we first tested it, it still sits squarely at the bottom of the sandwich ladder.

Now you know what to avoid, and we urge you to click on the Food Matters link to read the whole list.  So, if you can’t eat any of the aforementioned items what do you eat?  There’s plenty to choose from.   Health Life lists 100 and you can read them all by clicking on their link. Here are their top ten.

http://www.dwlz.com/HealthyLife/healthy50.html

THE 100 HEALTHIEST FOODS

Fruit

Fat/Calorie Breakdown

Body Benefits

(1) Apples

1 medium apple:
81 calories, 0 g fat

An apple’s 3 g of fiber help you meet your fiber goal of 20 g to 30 g daily.  High-fiber diets can lower heart disease risk.

(2) Apricots

3 apricots:
51 calories, 0 g fat

A good source of beta-carotene (which is converted to vitamin A by the body), providing the equivalent of 35% of the RDA for vitamin A

(3) Bananas

1 medium:
105 calories, 0 g fat

Bananas are a great source of potassium, which plays a key role in heart health and muscle function.  Plus each one has 2 g of fiber.

(4) Blackberries

1 cup:
74 calories, 0 g fat

This fruit boasts a whopping 10 g of fiber in a single cup.

(5) Blueberries

1 cup:
81 calories, 0 g fat

Blueberries help prevent and treat bladder infections by making it hard for bacteria to stick to urinary tract walls.

(6) Cantaloupe

1 cup, cubed:
84 calories, 1 g fat

An antioxidant double whammy, with 68 mg of vitamin C and enough beta-carotene to cover 65% of your daily vitamin A quota.

(7) Cherries

1 cup:
84 calories, 1 g fat

A good source of perillyl alcohol, which helps prevent cancer in animals.  Heart-protective anthocyanins give cherries their color.

(8) Cranberry
juice

1 cup:
144 calories, 0 g fat

Fights bladder infections the same way blueberries do.

(9) Grapefruits

1/2 fruit:
39 calories, 0 g fat

A good source of vitamin C and a compound called naringenin, which helps suppress tumors in animals.

(10) Purple grapes
and juice

1 cup seedless:
113 calories, 9 g fat

Offer three heart-guarding compounds:  flavonoids, anthocyanins and resveratrol.  (Green grapes are not rich in them)

If you insist on eating meat there are some good choices you can make…we’ll jump ahead on the list to give you a sneak preview.

74) Beef 3 oz, cooked:
150 to 280 calories,
5 g to 20 g fat
Beef is a good source of both CLA and iron, but since it’s also high in saturated fat, have it no more than three times a week.
(75) Chicken,
without skin
3 oz, cooked:
162 calories, 6 g fat
Remove the skin and you’ve got an excellent, low fat source of protein.  And 3 oz provides 38% of the RDA for the B vitamin niacin.
(76) Lamb 3 oz, cooked, trimmed
of fat:
175 calories, 8 g fat
Lamb, like beef, is also a good source of CLA.  Ditto beef’s saturated fat warning and weekly consumption recommendation.
(77) Lean
pork
3 oz, cooked, trimmed
of fat:
140 calories, 4 g fat
Fat-trimmed pork tenderloin has one-third less fat than even lean beef.  And it boasts 71% of the RDA for thiamine.

If Healthy Life doesn’t offer you enough good food ideas, here are some other excellent resources for you to peruse.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

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Transplants — With An Emphasis on Recovery (by organ)


The organs most commonly transplanted are Heart, Kidneys, Liver, Pancreas, Lungs and Intestines.  The entire process of organ transplantation is traumatic, from the time you are diagnosed  through the evaluation process, your time on the waiting list and finally recovery from the surgery.   If you are told you are going to need an organ transplant you are also being told that your life is about to change dramatically.

THE DIAGNOSIS

When you are diagnosed as needing a transplant you are being told that there are no good recovery alternatives for your disease.  It is likely that most of them have been tried.  While the physician is unlikely to tell you that your days are numbered you will probably hear that you that you have an end-stage disease.  That’s Dr. talk for, “You are dying.”  Getting that news is a traumatic event and you may need to discuss it with someone or even get professional help.

In order for your medical team to determine if you need a transplant you will have to undergo a thorough physical and mental evaluation.  Before they do that, though, there is a critical questions that must be answered,  “Do you have the financial resources to pay for a transplant should they find that you need one?”  If you cannot answer that question affirmatively a hospital social worker might be able to help but your chances of getting a transplant will be delayed until that single question gets a positive answer.  Once answered, though, the evaluation process begins and you will embark on an unprecedented medical voyage.   Among other things they have to determine  that you are a good surgical risk.

In addition to assessing  your physical condition, the team will consider  your attitude and psychological state among other factors. Donated organs are a rare commodity, so doctors don’t want to proceed unless they are sure that a patient is physically and mentally prepared for both the procedure and for life following it.  Your transplant team will also want to ensure that you have a competent caregiver,  someone you can depend on to watch over your recovery.  This is a key element of the process, you simply must be able to show that you have a caregiver who will make a significant investment of time as you regain your strength so you can return to a “normal” life. 

And…a caution if you smoke or are addicted to either drugs or alcohol chances are you will be told you must quit or there will be no transplant.  Generally you have to show that you have abstained from the two for at least six months.   Again, organs are precious and there aren’t very many available so medical facilities want transplant candidates that can prove they will take good care of them.

When the tests are complete and show clear medical evidence that you need an organ transplant, your physician will present your case to the medical center transplant committee.  If they approve, you will be added to the national transplant list at the United Network for Organ sharing (UNOS).  Then the wait begins and that, too, is traumatic.  Some people never get an organ, others wait a long time and some, like me are luckier and have a short wait.  Mine was only thirteen days but it took twelve years after my diagnosis before I was sick enough to get on the list.

THE SURGERY

Once the transplant committee approves you for the procedure you will be placed on the national transplant list and then you wait…you wait for “THE CALL.”    When it comes  you will be asked to get to your medical center rather quickly where they likely will perform additional tests in preparation for the surgery.  Prep includes giving you something that will “relax” you.  In reality it will knock you out.

You will awaken in intensive care, surrounded by beeping, chirping monitors, IV bags hanging from chrome stands, electrodes attached to your body and perhaps a ventilator.  Awakening from the surgery can be scary, because you may not be fully aware of what happened or where you are, and because of the ventilator you will be unable to talk. Most often they remove the “vent” as soon as possible.  In my case it was gone when I awakened.

Usually the medical staff will try to get you on your feet and moving around as soon as possible but depending on the transplant and your condition hospital stays can range from a week or so to a much longer period of time.  Then there is the recovery process and having gone through it this blogger strongly advises you to do everything your physicians suggest because that’s what will keep you alive.  

As I mentioned earlier, the organs most commonly transplanted are Heart, Kidneys, Liver, Pancreas, Lungs and Intestines.  Recovery from these surgeries is sometimes difficult and for a while following surgery you will make many return trips to see your coordinator and physician.

THE RECOVERY

Critical Information You Need To know

Below I have listed the recovery process for all six of the organ transplants I listed earlier.  I chose to use a different transplant center for each organ to show that while centers may differ a little in the recovery process the bottom line is always the same and that is to ensure that the patient has a sound recovery and can then lead a healthy and satisfying life.  

Kidney Transplant Recovery

Cleveland Clinic

http://tinyurl.com/bh9jp4o  

Frequently Asked Questions

Now that I feel better, when can I return to my regular activities?

You can resume your previous activities as soon as you feel better — and you might even feel good enough to add some new activities. A daily exercise program will continue to improve your health and help you maintain a positive attitude.

You will not injure yourself or your new kidney if you follow some of these general guidelines:

  • Avoid lifting heavy objects and strenuous physical work for at least six to eight weeks following surgery. It is important that you also do not lift anything heavier than 20 pounds for two to three months, and nothing heavier than 40 pounds for four to six months from the date of your surgery.
  • Avoid driving for at least six weeks following surgery. Plan ahead so a friend or family member can help out during this time. When you are in a moving vehicle, always use your seat belt.
  • Exercise is encouraged, and we recommend beginning with stretching exercises and walking. Other excellent exercises include jogging, hiking, bicycling, tennis, golf, swimming, and aerobics. All of these can help you regain your strength and may be started gradually after your incision has healed.
  • As a general rule, rough contact sports should be avoided since they might cause injury to your transplanted kidney. If you have doubts about any activity, please ask the Transplant Team.

When will I be able to return to work?

Many kidney transplant patients are able to return to work within a few months following a successful surgery. However, various aspects of the recovery process can effect the timing of your return.

You will need to discuss returning to your job with the Transplant Team. When the time approaches, a “return to work” letter will provided. This will let your employer know when you may begin working and what limitations, if any, you have.

How soon can I take a vacation?

You may travel as soon as you are feeling better, but always let the Transplant Team know when you plan to go and provide a phone number where you can be reached. By remembering these traveling tips, your vacation will be worry free:

  • Always take all of your medicine with you and make sure you have enough medicine to last throughout your trip.
  • If you are traveling by plane, carry your medicine with you. Never check them with your luggage.
  • Make sure you have your Transplant Center’s phone number.
  • Check to see if there is a medical laboratory or transplant center nearby where you can have your blood work completed. This lab will need to report your results to your Transplant office.

Heart Transplant Recovery

Mayo Clinic

http://tinyurl.com/bf6692s

Because I got a heart transplant at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville Florida in 2007 it is the one with which I am most familiar.  I was in the hospital for 9 days and experienced little discomfort other than feeling weak.

What you can expect

During the procedure
Heart transplant surgery usually takes about four hours — longer if you’ve had previous heart surgeries or if there are complications during the procedure. The surgeon will open your chest and connect you to a heart-lung machine to keep oxygen-rich blood flowing throughout your body. The diseased heart is removed, and the donor heart is sewn into place. The new heart often starts beating when blood flow is restored. Sometimes an electric shock is needed to make the donor heart beat properly.

You’ll be in pain after the surgery, which will be treated with medications. You’ll also have a ventilator to help you breathe and tubes in your chest to drain fluids from around your lungs and heart.

After the procedure
After you’ve had surgery to place your donor heart, you’ll likely remain in the hospital for a week or two, and then you’ll be closely monitored at your outpatient transplant center for about three months. While at the transplant center, you’ll have regular tests on your donor heart, including blood work, echocardiograms, electrocardiograms and heart biopsies.

There are also several long-term adjustments you’ll need to make after you’ve had your heart transplant. These include:

  • Taking immunosuppressants. These medications decrease the activity of your immune system to prevent it from attacking your donated heart. Because your immune system will most likely never get used to the new organ, you’ll take some of these medications for the rest of your life.

These medications may cause noticeable side effects. With taking some post-transplant drugs, such as corticosteroids, your face may become round and full, and you may gain weight, develop acne or facial hair, or experience stomach problems. Some of the effects are more noticeable when you first start the drug regimen, but decrease in severity later on.

Because immunosuppressants make your body more vulnerable to infection, your doctor may also prescribe antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal medications. Some drugs could worsen — or raise your risk of developing — conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cancer or diabetes. Over time as the risk of rejection is reduced, the doses and number of anti-rejection drugs can be reduced, but you will need some immunosuppressant medications indefinitely.

  • Managing medications and therapies. After a heart transplant, taking all your medications as your doctor instructs is important. It’s a good idea to set up a daily routine for taking your medications so that you won’t forget. Keep a list of all your medications with you at all times in case you need emergency medical attention, and tell all your doctors each time you’re prescribed a new medicine.
  • Cardiac rehabilitation. After your transplant, you may find it difficult to adjust to new lifestyle changes, such as diet and exercise. Cardiac rehabilitation programs can help you adjust to these changes so that you can regain your strength and improve your quality of life.
  • Emotional support. Your new medical therapies and the stress of having a heart transplant may make you feel overwhelmed. Many people who have had a heart transplant feel this way. Talk to your doctor if you’re feeling stressed or overwhelmed. Transplant centers often have support groups and other resources to help you manage your condition.

Lung transplant Recovery

Duke University Medical Center

http://tinyurl.com/ajp7n8h

Use these patient resources to understand steps you need to take after your lung transplant procedure at Duke.  Click on the links for full details.

Infections in a transplant patient can be quite serious, even life-threatening. Good hand washing, along with a few other practices will help prevent infection.

After lung transplant, your health will be constantly monitored to ensure that your lungs are healthy and not being rejected .

Learn what symptoms may signal infection and find out what steps to take to maintain your health and prevent infection.

After transplant, your body is more susceptible to infection. Learn how to avoid and manage common infections.

Rejection of your transplanted lung(s) can occur at any time following your surgery. Discover steps to take to avoid rejection or ways to manage your health if you do experience rejection of your new lungs.

Learn what to expect in regards to pulmonary preparation and rehabilitation before and after lung transplant.

Diet and nutrition are very important aspects of everyday care after a lung transplant. Find guidelines to keep you healthy after transplant.

Sexual activity doesn’t have to be avoided after lung transplant. Following a few simple guidelines will ensure that you stay healthy while enjoying sex.

When patients show signs that their new lungs are being rejected, we have a number of ways to combat that rejection including steroids, RATG, and Campath.

Pancreas Transplant Recovery

Vanderbilt University Medical Center

http://tinyurl.com/avkgyhe

You will be encouraged to get out of bed as soon as possible– usually the first or second day after surgery. This is an important way to prevent pneumonia. We will encourage you to walk around your room and down the hall at least three times a day. Walking increases your blood circulation, helps relieve gas pains, and helps maintain your muscle tone.

Each morning, we will draw blood to follow your progress and adjust your daily medicines. The most important blood tests to measure your kidney function are B.U.N. and CREATININE.

Another way to watch your new kidney’s progress is to accurately measure how much fluid you drink each day and how much urine you put out. At first the nurses will measure this for you. Eventually you will be taught to do this for yourself.

You will be weighed daily before breakfast. It is important to weigh at the same time each day on the same scales with the same clothes on. This is a habit you’ll need to continue after you’re sent home. Weight gain can be a sign of rejection of your new kidney.

Once you and your nurse feel you are able to care for yourself outside the hospital you will be sent home. If you live out of town you may want to stay at the Guest House Inn near Vanderbilt for a short period of time after discharge. During this time you will be coming back to Vanderbilt for outpatient evaluation two to three times per week.

Liver Transplant Recovery

University of California San Francisco

http://tinyurl.com/bxbfptz

After surgery, you will go directly to the intensive care unit (ICU), usually for one or two days. Immediately after surgery, a breathing tube will be inserted to help you breathe. In most cases the tube can be removed within 24 hours after surgery. Many monitoring lines also will be attached; these, too, will be removed as you become more stable. When you are ready to leave the ICU, you will be cared for on the 14th floor of the hospital if you’re an adult. Children are cared for on the sixth or seventh floor. Everyone recuperates from liver transplantation differently. Depending on your condition, you will be hospitalized for two to eight weeks following the transplant.

After the Hospital

After you are discharged from the hospital, you will be seen in the liver transplant clinic at least once a week for the first month. As you improve, you will be seen less often; eventually, you will be seen once a year.

If you are not from the San Francisco area, you probably will need to stay close by for the first month after discharge. After that, your doctor or a specialist near your home will provide follow-up care. Laboratory blood tests are obtained twice a week following transplantation. Gradually, the frequency of blood tests will be reduced.

You will be notified about any adjustments in your medications. Complications can occur with any surgery. Patients undergoing organ transplantation may face additional complications. The life-threatening disease that created the need for your transplant may affect the functioning of other body systems. Other risks, such as rejection, also may occur.

Some possible transplant complications and medication side effects include:

  • Hemorrhage — One function of the liver is to manufacture clotting factors. When a liver fails, the ability to produce clotting factors is impaired. To correct this problem, you will receive blood products before and after surgery. It is expected that your new liver will start working very quickly to help prevent any excessive bleeding, but it is possible that you may be returned to surgery to control the bleeding, particularly if it occurs within the first 48 hours after transplant.
  • Thrombosis — This is a serious complication that may require a second transplant. If a blood clot forms in a vessel leading to or from your liver, this may injure your new liver. You will receive special anticoagulation medication to prevent thrombosis.
  • Rejection — Your body’s defense system, the immune system, protects you from invading organisms. Unfortunately, it also views your new liver as foreign and will try to destroy it in an attempt to protect you. This is known as rejection. To prevent this from occurring, you will be given special immunosuppressive medication that must be taken for the rest of your life. Rejection can be diagnosed early by performing weekly liver biopsies during the first few weeks after liver transplant. Although rejection is common, with early diagnosis and treatment the situation can be controlled in more than 95 percent of cases.
  • Recurrent disease — Many liver diseases may come back after your transplant. Hepatitis C is the most common disease that can reoccur following a liver transplant. Your doctors will discuss this further with you.

Intestinal Transplant Recovery

Georgetown University Medical Center

http://tinyurl.com/a48grko

The Healing Process

After your small bowel transplantation, there are two challenges. First, you must manage the pain and recover. Second, you must learn to manage living and eating with a transplanted small bowel.

Will I be in pain?

Immediately following surgery, you will experience pain. We will do everything we can to make you as comfortable as possible. Most transplant patients have a significant reduction in pain several weeks after surgery. Some people continue to have some discomfort for a longer time.

Where will I spend my time in the hospital?

Immediately after surgery, you will be transferred to the intensive care unit. You will spend several days there as the Transplant Team monitors you very carefully.

After your stay in the intensive care unit, you will be transferred to the General Transplant Unit, where you will be instructed on how to assume responsibility for your everyday care. You will be encouraged to get out of bed at least three times a day and walk around your room and the halls. This increases your circulation and aids in healing.

What are the possible risks and complications?

You team is watching for the following possible complications:

  • Increased ostomy output
  • Fever
  • Nausea and/or vomiting
  • Blood in stools/ostomy output
  • Change in appetite

Please do not be scared or anxious about possible complications. Our team has many solutions for possible complications. All transplants carry risk and we will do everything we can to minimize those risks.

How long will it take to know if the new small bowel is working?

There may be a delay in the function of your transplanted small bowel. This may increase the length of your stay in the hospital as well as the risk of complications. There is also the possibility your transplanted small bowel will not function. You would be relisted in the highest priority category allowed.

What about the possible risk of infection?

Infection is always a concern following any major surgery. The Transplant Team will monitor you for signs and symptoms of an infection.

How long before I can leave the hospital?

You must remain in the local area (within two to three hours of Washington, DC) for four to six weeks post discharge for monitoring

While the information you just consumed is general in nature you will likely find that with a few modifications it is the process most transplant centers will follow.  If you have more specific information needs you should call your transplant coordinator, social worker or physician.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

“His” Heart, My Life, My Story


I wrote this account of my life since receiving a heart transplant in hopes that others will benefit from my experiences.  Most of you who will have transplants will have a far easier time of it than I did.  You must remember that I was 68 years old when I had mine and that alone can make a huge difference in recovery time and other factors as well.  If any of you have any questions after reading this please contact me personally at bob@baronson.org.

Being a transplant recipient is an amazing experience.  I simply cannot describe what the feeling is like knowing that one of the parts you were born has been discarded and replaced with one belonging to someone else who in all likelihood died…except for the organ that is keeping you alive.

I don’t know who my donor was.  I only know he was about 30 years old when he died and he was from South Carolina.  I have written to my donor family but not heard from them so I assume they prefer to remain anonymous and I understand and accept that.

Everyone who has ever had a transplant has had a unique experience that nothing else in life can match.  Each day I am struck by the awareness that the heart I was born with, that kept me alive for 68 years no longer beats within my chest.  It died.  I didn’t.  Wow!

Often when I lie in bed I feel the rhythmic thumping that kept someone else alive for 30 years is now doing the same for me.  “His” heart is my life.  “His” heart pumps my blood, in my body to my brain and allows me to think, to live, love and enjoy life. “His” heart, not mine.

My donor has given me a lot but his greatest gift is allowing me the extra time to be with my wonderful wife Robin.

In 1995 after collapsing in a parking ramp am rushed to a hospital, I was diagnosed with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy and was told that someday I might need a heart transplant.  As the owner of a communications consulting business I was very active and travelled a great deal both domestically and internationally, but slowly my health began to deteriorate.  Always the optimist I adjusted and slowed down a little but not so anyone would really notice.

Then in 1996 my wife was diagnosed with lung cancer and I ignored my condition while we dealt with hers which included many chemotherapy and radiation sessions.  After a long and courageous battle with that terrible disease she succumbed in November of 1998.  We had been married for 35 years.  It was a devastating time and at age 59 I felt lost, alone and without hope as I began to feel the effects of my own condition.

About a year later I met Robin Diffie and as we got to know each other I felt my life just might come back together after all, but my version of the sword of Damocles, cardiomyopathy, continued its swing through my life as my heart function continued to fall with a resultant decrease in my ability to function.

In 2000 Robin and I were married in Eagan, Minnesota but by then the condition which would later require a heart transplant was becoming debilitating, when I travelled I began to ask for wheelchair service in airports and Robin began traveling with me to make sure I got one and to act as my “pusher.”

Cardiomyopathy kind of sneaks up on you and kicks your butt softly at first but then harder and harder.  The effect of the disease is measured by ones “Ejection Fraction” (EF).  A normal heart will pump out about 60% of the blood it contains every time it beats.  As the disease progresses the EF keeps going down and the heart enlarges in order to store the blood that doesn’t’ get ejected.  My heart was getting very large and by 2006 my EF was around 10% and decreasing.  Clearly I was dying and too sick to work.  Sometimes I could barely walk a few feet without having to stop to rest.  My heart was just barely pumping enough blood to keep me alive.  Reluctantly I made the decision to retire.

It was then that we decided to move to Jacksonville, Florida and we did so for two reasons.  1) Moving there offered the greatest likelihood of getting a heart.  My research indicated that the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville had a wonderful record in organ procurement and transplantation.  2) It was an easy decision because Jacksonville is Robin’s home town and her entire family is there.  I still question Robin’s sanity in marrying a dying man but no matter I am grateful for whatever bug struck her and caused the instability.

After undergoing the battery of tests that are required to qualify for a transplant, I was finally approved and placed on the national list on August 8th of 2007.  I had resigned myself to either a very long wait or, I thought, no heart at all because of my age.  It had already been twelve very long years since I was diagnosed with a fatal heart disease.  I thought that at age 68 it was unlikely that I would get a heart and if I did it wouldn’t be anytime soon — but I got lucky.

Only 13 days after being listed I got the call from Mayo Clinic Transplant Cardiologist Dr. Jeffrey Hosenpud that he “might” have a heart for me.  He did.  I got one and August 21st 2007 goes down in history as my “other” birthday.

My recovery from the transplant was difficult to say the least.  It took four years before I finally felt good again.  I quit smoking in 1991 but the 37 year habit had already taken its toll, I had Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).  That’s a disease of the lungs that can best be described as feeling as though you are breathing through a straw…try that some time.  COPD is bad enough but when you get pneumonia on top of it you have another life threatening situation.  Well, I got pneumonia shortly after my surgery and was hospitalized again but the recovery was very slow and touch and go before I slowly regained my strength.  I now know that another bout with pneumonia could kill me so I try to be pretty careful about what I expose myself to.

I no sooner recovered from the pneumonia virus than I was stricken with indescribable absolutely excruciating pain….pain so severe that sometimes I would just sit and cry. Part of the pain, I’m told, was the result of the way I was positioned during my surgery.  Apparently your left arm is in a strange position in order to allow the surgeon unobstructed access to the chest cavity, but a transplant takes a long time and it seems that my arm needed different medical attention than was delivered.

The pain in my left arm right down to my wrist and fingers was awful but then just when I thought it couldn’t get worse, it did.  The pain spread to both shoulders, my neck and lower back for and went on for months.  Torn rotator cuffs were part of the reason but much of the pain came from unknown causes, perhaps it was the way I was sleeping or  maybe the lack of proper exercise and maybe because of an old auto accident.  We’ll never know the exact cause but it was finally resolved with a combination of physical therapy and Oxycontin the potent, addictive pain killer, and addictive it was.

I’ve been a recovering alcoholic since 1982.  I understand addiction and I understood quite well that I had become dependent on the narcotic.  I no longer really needed it for the pain for which it was prescribed, I needed it for the pain caused by the withdrawal you experience between “hits.”  When you are taking pain killers there’s a simple question you must ask yourself every time you reach for a pill.  “Am I taking this because I need it for pain or am I taking it because I want it?”  If you are truthful with yourself and the answer is the latter, you have a problem.  I had a problem.  By addict standards I wasn’t taking much Oxycontin, only about 30-40 milligrams a day, but it was enough for me to know I needed the drug, needed it not to get high…I needed it to feel normal.  That’s what happens to every drunk and junkie…they ultimately drink, shoot or take pills just to try to feel normal.  Often the first high you have, is the last one.

Having been through chemical dependency treatment in 1982 I knew what I had to do but I also knew I couldn’t do it cold turkey.  I found a highly reputable pain clinic that specialized in addiction and started going there.  They immediately took me off of Oxycontin and put me on Suboxone another addictive drug but one that is used to slowly help people through the painful withdrawal that comes with quitting.  It took several months but it worked and I was Oxycontin free but, sorry, the story doesn’t end there.

You’d think that after having survived cardiomyopathy, getting a heart transplant, beating terrible pain and withdrawing from an addictive drug I would finally feel better.  Unfortunately the light at the end of my tunnel was an oncoming train that hit me hard and almost had me down for the count because for no explainable reason I fell into a deep, dark depression that lasted for a couple of years.

Each day I would awaken, head to my favorite recliner in a corner of the den and sit there in the dark drinking coffee and watching TV.  I was nearly a zombie.  Some days I wouldn’t even shower and I didn’t want to see or talk to anyone.  That was my life day after day, week after week for a couple of years.   Depression is one of those diseases where you don’t know how bad off you are until you are no longer bad off.  The only thing that gave me any hope each day was maintaining my presence on the Facebook group I started, Organ Transplant Initiative and my blog on WordPress, Bob’s Newheart.  While I knew I needed professional help I was so depressed I didn’t’ care if I got it so I kept putting it off.  Finally with Robin’s gentle prodding I went back to Mayo and began treatment but you don’t beat depression overnight or even in a few months.  Sometimes it takes a considerable amount of trial and error before the right treatment is found.  That came right around my four year post surgery mark but not until i had lost 75 pounds from lack of appetite.  i was left weak but finally energized and optimistic again.

Through all of that Robin, the lunatic who married a dying man, was steady as a rock. She had her hands full running two businesses and our home plus being my caregiver.  I’ll never know how she did it and kept her wits about her but she never flinched.  She is the most amazing, compassionate and competent human being I have ever encountered.  She is an unflappable optimist who doesn’t have a selfish bone in her body.  I don’t know why I was so blessed to find this woman but  as the man said, “Somebody up there likes me.”

That takes us to today…five plus years later and I feel wonderful but most importantly I get to spend time with Robin.  If a physician could have written a prescription for love, happiness and contentment it would simply have said, “Robin.”  It is only because of my donor that I am getting to spend time with this wonderful, gracious, smart, talented, funny and super woman.  The heart of a stranger has allowed us to really get to know each other.  There is no greater gift my donor could have given me and yes, that’s selfish but in this case I think selfish is OK.

Like many recipients my life has changed in other ways as well.  Because of a transplant I’m a different person.  I hope I’m a better person.  I know I appreciate life a great deal more than I ever did before, but it is not only my life I appreciate, it is everyone’s life.  When you experience death or near death, “life” takes on a whole new meaning.  My reaction to being a transplant recipient is that I owe my donor big time.  While I can’t do anything for him directly I can honor his memory by doing everything in my power to help others live.  That’s why I am such an outspoken donation/transplantation activist.

While science generally rejects the notion, some recipients feel they have taken on some of the characteristics of their donor.  I can’t say what my donor’s characteristics were because I didn’t know him but my life has changed as a result of having his heart.  He may well be the influence behind some of the changes I have experienced which include:

  • I am much less selfish than I was before and spend as much time as I can trying to help others.
  • I am much less concerned with material things than I used to be.  “Appearances” aren’t important anymore.  I don’t have to have a new car, wear the best clothes or get recognition.  I simply don’t care about those things.
  • I am far more passionate about causes I believe in like fairness, equality and justice.  I particularly feel a need to help the economically disadvantaged, the disabled, the sick, the elderly and, of course — children who suffer so many indignities of which they should not even be aware, never mind being forced to experience them.
  • I am more of a peacemaker.  In the past I was a warrior, a bulldozer who when advocating for a cause would show my commitment by rolling over those who disagreed and sometimes belittling them in the process.  Now I believe in finding common ground and forming friendships despite serious disagreements.
  • I am much less self-centered than I used to be.  I have come to accept who I am and as a result can concentrate on the needs of others.
  • I have always enjoyed learning but it has almost become an obsession since my transplant.  My thirst for knowledge about a wide variety of things knows no bounds.  I can’t get enough information about the wonders around us like the sun and the stars and the miracles, medical and otherwise that we experience every day.
  • Working with my hands has always been enjoyable for me but since my transplant I have become addicted to woodwork.  I’m not the Michelangelo of woodworking, hell I’m not even a Barney Fife but I am determined to get better at it.  Unfortunately it is my friends and family who must suffer receiving my woodworking “gifts” and then acting as though they like them.

Being a transplant recipient is an amazing experience.  It is one of which I am always aware and I mean always that I have someone else’ heart.  There is no time in my waking hours that I am not aware that I am alive because a generous stranger give me his heart.  I owe him and his family more than I could ever repay no matter what efforts I make for the rest of my life.

If you, the reader, are an organ donor, let me thank you on behalf of the unknown lives you may save as a result of your selfless action.  If you are not an organ donor, please consider it carefully.  You can save or enhance the lives of up to 60 people just by signing up and you can do that so easily.  Just go to www.donatelife.net and follow the directions.  Then, tell your family what you’ve done so there is no chance that anyone will object when the time comes to fulfill your commitment.

Earlier in this story I mentioned my Facebook Group and Blog. Let me take just a moment to explain how they came to be.  Just a couple of months after my transplant I got a call from Mayo asking if I’d be interested in starting a Facebook Organ donation group and in writing a blog.  I knew what neither were but decided I needed something to do during my recuperation and said, “Yes.”  With Mayo’s help I got started immediately.

That was the beginning or Facebook’s Organ Transplant Initiative group (OTI) and Bob’s Newheart blog on WordPress www.bobsnewheart.wordpress.com .  OTI now has almost 2,500 members and I’ve posted 140 blogs on donation/transplantation issues that have been read by over 100,000 people in at least 20 countries.  I believe that I was given my new heart to do this and it has become my new passion.

None of this would be possible without all you wonderful people who helped to make OTI a success and who read my “Stuff” on WordPress.  By offering your kind words, thoughts and deeds you are doing a great service to those who suffer while waiting for organs and those who are recovering from receiving them, never mind the caregivers and others who are so critical to the donation/transplantation process.  Words cannot express my fondness for all of you and my gratitude for your involvement.  All I can say is, thank you from the bottom of my donor’s heart.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

How Alcohol Can Wreck Your Body


(This report is from the U.K.  You will notice that it refers to “units.”  That’s the same as a about a half of one “shot” of alcohol in the U.S.)  http://tinyurl.com/948cvhs

From heart to liver and brain to kidneys, a night on the tiles makes demands on us that we don’t fully realise. Peta Bee reports

6pm One Unit: It’s been a long day…

BRAIN: From the first sip, alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream and reaches the brain. Although you won’t be aware of it, there is an impairment of brain function, which deteriorates further the more you drink. Cognitive abilities that are acquired later in life, such as conduct and behaviour, are the first to go. Early on you will experience mild euphoria and loss of inhibition, as alcohol impairs regions of the brain controlling behaviour and emotion. Most vulnerable are the brain cells associated with memory, attention, sleep and coordination. Sheer lack of mass means that people who weigh less become intoxicated more quickly, and women will feel the effects faster than men. This is also because their bodies have lower levels of water.

HEART: Your pulse quickens after just one unit. Alcohol is a vasodilator – it makes the peripheral blood vessels relax to allow more blood to flow through the skin and tissues, which results in a drop in blood pressure. In order to maintain sufficient blood flow to the organs, the heart rate increases. Your breathing rate may also speed up.

8pm Five Units: Whose round is it then?

DIGESTIVE SYSTEM: The Government advises men to drink no more than three to four units a day and women no more than two to three, so after two pints of normal-strength beer (four units) or a large glass of red wine (3.5 units) we have already exceeded our healthy guidelines. The alcohol is absorbed through the stomach and small intestine and if you are not used to it, even small amounts of alcohol can irritate the stomach lining. This volume of alcohol also begins to block absorption of essential vitamins and minerals.

SKIN: Alcohol increases bloodflow to the skin, making you feel warm and look flushed. It also dehydrates, increasing the appearance of fine lines. According to Dr Nicholas Perricone, a dermatologist, even five units will lead to an unhealthy appearance for days.

11pm 10 Units: Sorry, what was your name again?

LUNGS: A small amount of alcohol speeds up the breathing rate. But at this level of intoxication, the stimulating effects of alcohol are replaced by an anaesthetic effect that acts as a depressant on the central nervous system. The heart rate lowers, as does blood pressure and respiration rates, possibly to risky levels – in extreme cases the effect could be fatal. During exhalation, the lungs excrete about 5 per cent of the alcohol you have consumed – it is this effect that forms the basis for the breathalyser test.

1am 15 Units: Let me tell you about my ex…

LIVER: Alcohol is metabolised in the liver and excessive alcohol use can lead to acute and chronic liver disease. As the liver breaks down alcohol, by-products such as acetaldehyde are formed, some of which are more toxic to the body than alcohol itself. It is these that can eventually attack the liver and cause cirrhosis. A heavy night of drinking upsets both the delicate balance of enzymes in the liver and fat metabolism. Over time, this can lead to the development of fatty globules that cause the organ to swell. It is generally accepted that drinking more than seven units (men) and five units (women) a day will raise the risk of liver cirrhosis.

3am 20 Units: Where am I? I need to lie down

HEART: More than 35 units a week, or a large number in one sitting, can cause ‘holiday heart syndrome’. This is atrial fibrillation – a rapid, irregular heartbeat that happens when the heart’s upper chambers contract too quickly. As a result, the heartbeat is less effective at pumping blood from the heart, and blood may pool and form clots. These can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. Atrial fibrillation gives a person nearly a fivefold increased risk of stroke. The effect is temporary, provided heavy drinking is stopped.

BLOOD: By this stage, alcohol has been carried to all parts of the body, including the brain, where it dissolves into the water inside cells. The effect of alcohol on the body is similar to that of an anaesthetic – by this stage, inhibitions are lost and feelings of aggression will surge.

The morning after: Can you please just shut up…

BRAIN: Alcohol dehydrates virtually every part of the body, and is also a neurotoxin that causes brain cells to become damaged and swell. This causes the hangover and, combined with low blood-sugar levels, can leave you feeling awful. Cognitive abilities such as concentration, coordination and memory may be affected for several days.

DIGESTION: Generally, it takes as many hours as the number of drinks you have consumed to burn up all the alcohol. Feelings of nausea result from dehydration, which also causes your thumping headache.

KIDNEYS: Alcohol promotes the making of urine in excess of the volume you have drunk and this can cause dehydration unless extra fluid is taken. Alcohol causes no damage or harm to the kidneys in the short term, but your kidneys will be working hard.

One year on: Where did it all go wrong?

REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS: Heavy drinking causes a drop in testosterone levels in men, and causes testicular shrinkage and impotence. In females, menstrual cycles can be disrupted and fertility is affected. Studies have shown that women who drink up to five units of alcohol a week are twice as likely to conceive as those who drink 10 or more. It is thought it may affect the ability of the fertilised egg to implant.

BRAIN: Over time, alcohol can cause permanent damage to the connection between nerve cells. As it is a depressant, alcohol can trigger episodes of depression, anxiety and lethargy.

HEART: Small amounts of alcohol (no more than a unit a day) can protect the heart, but heavy drinking leads to chronic high blood pressure and other heart irregularities.

BLOOD: Alcohol kills the oxygen-carrying red blood cells, which can lead to anaemia.

CANCER: Excessive alcohol consumption is linked to an increase in the risk of most cancers. Last week, Cancer Research UK warned how growing alcohol use is causing a steep rise in mouth cancer cases.

PANCREAS: Just a few weeks of heavy drinking can result in painful inflammation of the pancreas, known as pancreatitis. It results in a swollen abdominal area and can cause nausea and vomiting.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Addiction — A Journey Into Hell


If you are suffering from organ failure and you are an addict you can be eligible for an organ transplant but you have to be clean and sober first and  most transplant centers require at least six months of sobriety before they will consider you.

Yesterday I posted a blog “My Last Drunk..” about the time 30 years ago I checked myself into treatment for alcoholism.  It was not a particularly outrageous story but it was significant  to me because it was my very last drunk.

I write a lot about addiction because it is one of the primary killers of human organs and because this group is dedicated to ending the organ shortage I’m hoping that stories about addiction and recovery will  help those suffering from the disease find their way into a recovery program.  If we can do that the demand for organs will decrease and those who remain on the list will have a better chance of getting a transplant.

I realize that there are many who refuse to believe that addiction is a disease and many who think addicts even if they are in recovery should not be eligible for transplants because of what they did to themselves.  And I will be the first to admit that addicts do the damage to themselves but it’s not on purpose, it is not because they choose to destroy their organs, their families and their careers.  Who would be crazy enough to do that?  The life of an addict is pure hell and readers will just have to believe me when I say, “No one would choose to live like that, no one!”

When you are an addict you are totally out of control and you don’t set out to harm anyone including yourself but the power of the disease is so great it is irresistible.  When the demand for your drug of choice invades your body you must respond to it no matter who gets hurt along the way. You will lie, cheat, steal and in some cases even physically harm anyone who gets between you and, in my case, my bottle.

Being an addict also means you spend inordinate amounts of time trying to figure out how to feed your habit.  With alcohol money is not as much a problem as with illegal or prescription drugs.  Alcohol is easy to get and relatively cheap but you still must plan.  In most places you can’t buy a bottle of booze on a Sunday so you have to make sure that you have enough booze on Saturday to take you through Monday.  Then in many cases, especially if you have a family you don’t want to know about your addiction, you have to have a place to hide your drug of choice.  I had a secret panel in the wall of our finished basement, a cubby hole In the garage, a special place in a sand pit near my home where I could hide and then dig up my bottle, inside an old tire in the garage and the bottom of the waste basket under used paper towels in the men’s room at my place of employment.

If illegal drugs are your problem then money becomes a huge issue and you will either steal it or con your best friends or family out of it by manipulating them in any one of a number of ways.  No lie is too outrageous for the addict and in many cases no action is too outrageous.  That’s how powerful the addiction is.  You will literally sell your soul to get what you need and the worst part of it is that you can’t even really get high anymore, you use to try to feel normal but all you really get is sicker and sicker both mentally and physically until either you are hospitalized, treated or die.

Addiction will overwhelm your sense of ethics, pride, morals, self-worth and will to live.  I remember having a conversation with myself once in which I said, “Bob you have to stop drinking, you are killing yourself!”  My response without thinking and without pause was, “I don’t care.”  That’s the power of the drug.

When I drank I sometimes consumed up to two quarts of vodka a day.  I was a big man 6’4” and 250 lbs.  I could hold a lot and miraculously I functioned.  I got up every day, put on a suit threw a quart of vodka in my oversized briefcase and went to work.  I drank my way through four years as a Governor’s press secretary and appeared to many if not most to be sober, I almost never was.

In the four years I anchored Morning Edition on the Minnesota Public Radio Network I rarely drew a sober breath yet I interviewed people, had impeccable timing, read news and performed all the other duties an on-air person can do. Sometimes I struggled mightily to keep from slurring words and to walk straight but I was able to fool most  of the people, most of the time.

But it all catches  up with you and at some point you find yourself in places and with people you would not normally associate with.  It is as though the rest of the world can’t see you.  All the while you know it is wrong but you just keep sinking deeper and deeper into the bottomless pit of despair and the more you realize how you have degenerated the more you use your drug of choice to help you forget what you have become.

Addiction is a horrible disease and as I mentioned in yesterday’s blog it cannot be overcome with will power it takes help, a lot of help from a lot of people and then it takes superhuman effort and the help of those same people and even more to stay sober.

One of the toughest parts of recovery is following the Alcoholics Anonymous step that dictates that you make amends to those you have harmed.  It means you must apologize and it also means your apology may not be accepted and you have to learn to live with that.  It’s part of the soul and conscience cleansing process and it is difficult but necessary.

Recovery from addiction is on-going.  You are never recovered because one drink, just one, will send you right back into that deadly spiral into the depths of living hell.  As the expression goes, “One drink is too many and a thousand is not enough.”

I’ll close with this. If you are an addict, there is hope and there is help. It isn’t easy and it isn’t quick but it can work and you can live a normal life again but you cannot do it alone.  You need help.  You can start by calling your local chapter of Alcoholics Anonymous or Narcotics Anonymous or any accredited treatment center. In most cases insurance will cover treatment.  If you are uninsured there is still help available through AA and NA.  It is only a phone call away. You just have to take it one day at a time, sometimes, it is one moment at a time but it is always moving forward, sober!

f you are an addict, think you might be or know someone who needs help here are some resources. 

http://nationalsubstanceabuseindex.org/

http://www.addictionresourceguide.com/resources.html

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment/resources

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

My Last Drunk The Beginning of a New Life.


My name is Bob Aronson.  I went to work every day wearing a suit.  I had been a popular radio and TV personality in another market, Press Secretary to a Minnesota Governor and was now the first Anchor for Morning Edition on the Minnesota Public Radio Network headquartered in Minnesota’s twin cities.  I was a major market radio host and newsman and that’s no small feat.  For all intents and purposes I was a respected member of society.  I had one small problem; I was also an uncontrollable drunk.   Following is but one day in the life of an alcoholic.

I’m telling this story because alcoholism and addiction is one of the greatest destroyers of human organs.  My long term addiction to alcohol and cigarettes (I quit smoking in 1991) quite likely contributed to my need for the heart transplant I received in August of 2007. 

Addiction is horrible, it is a terrible existence and the addict is powerless to stop it without help.  The craving for the drug, whatever it is, is stronger than any force you will ever encounter.  It overpowers reason, common sense, logic and even the love of family.  It destroys your moral code, your sense of ethics and even your hygiene.  You begin to live your life for the drug.  It is your best friend.   

Those of you without an addiction will have trouble understanding this and I’ve heard many of you say, “Just use some will power!”  O God if it were that easy.  I remember an addiction counselor telling a group  once, “Using will power to conquer addiction will get the same result as trying to use will power to control diarrhea.”  She was so right.

Following is but one slice of a long life of alcoholism.  It is the day, 30 years ago, that I stopped drinking.  This not the worst story I could tell, those aren’t even fit to print, but rather this is the  most significant because it marked the beginning of my sobriety.

I  should point out, too, that once a drunk always a drunk its just that some of us drunks are sober.

On July 17 of 1982 I awakened early in the morning with a splitting headache and nausea.  I stumbled through the bedroom covered in my own vomit to make it to the bathroom. Kneeling on the floor before the toilet I retched over and over again but there was nothing left in my stomach.  Its contents were on and around my bed and my t-shirt and underwear. 

When the retching stopped I stripped and stepped into a cold shower that felt like a million icy pinpricks.  I thought I smelled sauerkraut in the house but none was cooking, the odor was me.  I stunk.  I scrubbed my body as hard as I could but not having eaten in several days my strength was at a minimum and taking a shower was wearing me out.  You see, I wasn’t just suffering plain old flu, mine was a special flu that I brought on myself…it came out of a bottle marked Vodka 80 proof.  This was the granddaddy of all hangovers.

Freshly showered and shaved I descended the staircase to the first floor of our home to find it empty.  A terse note on the kitchen table told me my wife had gone to see some friends.   “So what” I thought.  “I’d rather be alone anyway.” 

Descending yet another set of stairs I found my way to the basement where behind the paneled walls I had built a secret compartment that housed my best friend, a quart bottle of 80 proof cheap vodka.  You see, when you are a drunk you drink for effect not for taste so why waste money when after a couple of swallows you can’t taste anything anyway. 

I removed the bottle from its cobwebbed hiding place, cracked the seal, removed the cap and put the opening to my lips.  As the clear liquid burned its way down my throat, I felt rescued.  The effect was almost immediate, I felt good again and didn’t give a damn about anyone but me.  Another couple of quick slugs and I was even better but by the time I got to the top of the basement stairs the alcohol hit me harder than ever before.  Because I hadn’t eaten in days and was not getting rest my resistance was down and I was drunk immediately.  

 In my addled brain I thought, “Another drink will fix this,” so I made my way back to the basement, recovered the bottle and literally crawled up the stairs into the kitchen where I fell into a kitchen chair uncapped the bottle and took another long slug.  In the few brief moments I had been awake I had already consumed a half quart of vodka. 

My mind was mush but somehow I remembered the night before, when we were to entertain my boss and his wife for dinner.  My wife had never met them so she was a little anxious.  I told her not to worry and busied myself with preparing our outdoor barbecue dinner.  Our garage was detached from the house so while I was out messing with the grill, I made a few trips into the garage for a rendezvous with another hidden bottle.  About 45 minutes before our guests were to arrive I had quite a buzz going but found a way to sneak another long swallow after which I told my wife I was going to lie down until the company came. 

Flashback now to my opening sentence because that’s the next thing I remember after lying down.  I went upstairs and passed out.  My poor wife was left to entertain people she had never met and, I was told later, made up the excuse that I had gotten very sick and had to go to bed.  She entertained them for the evening while I slept the sleep only a drunk can know. 

As I sat at the kitchen table, the realization of what must have happened made me realize how low I had sunk and I polished off the quart of vodka to somehow assuage my guilt.  Here I was with my head the table, drunk again, remorseful and needing another drink but my stash was gone.  I had no more and knew I could not drive — hell, I could hardly walk.

Reluctantly I picked up the phone and dialed my brother.  I told him I needed help because I thought I was an alcoholic.  He drove me to a treatment center and that’s when my life began anew.  

I need to pause here for a moment to offer thanks to some people who gave me a much needed break Bill Kling, founder and President of Minnesota Public Radio,  Sally Pope Kling his wife, Rick Lewis, who then was the VP of News at MPR and John Merli, the News Director..  They not only allowed me time to recover but to come back to MPR and continue to work.  Thanks Bill, Sally, Rick and John.  And…of course my brother Terry who took  me to treatment.  All of you will always be in my thoughts and prayers.

Within a year I started my own communications consulting business which I am still practicing. 

If you are an addict, think you might be or know someone who needs help here are some resources. 

http://nationalsubstanceabuseindex.org/

http://www.addictionresourceguide.com/resources.html

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-drug-addiction-treatment/resources

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers. 

Are You an Alcoholic? Here’s the Test


By Bob Aronson

devil cartoonAlcohol, Drugs and Tobacco can have deadly effects on your organs and constitute one of the leading contributors to the need for organ transplantation.  I have long contended that while organ donation is important we just aren’t making enough headway under the current system.  Too many people are dying because of the organ shortage.  One way of reducing the organ shortage is to diminish the demand.   Healthier living could help achieve that goal. Look at this listing of the short and long term effects of alcohol.

Depending on how much is taken and the physical condition of the individual, alcohol can cause:

  • Slurred speech
  • Drowsiness
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Upset stomach
  • Headaches
  • Breathing difficulties
  • Distorted vision and hearing
  • Impaired judgment
  • Decreased perception and coordination
  • Unconsciousness
  • Anemia (loss of red blood cells)
  • Coma
  • Blackouts (memory lapses, where the drinker cannot remember events that occurred while under the influence)

Long-term effects of alcohol

Binge drinking and continued alcohol use in large amounts are associated with many health problems, including:

 

  • Unintentional injuries such as car crash, falls, burns, drowning
  • Intentional injuries such as firearm injuries, sexual assault, domestic violence
  • Increased on-the-job injuries and loss of productivity
  • Increased family problems, broken relationships
  • Alcohol poisoning
  • High blood pressure, stroke, and other heart-related diseases
  • Liver disease
  • Nerve damage
  • Sexual problems
  • Permanent damage to the brain
  • Vitamin B1 deficiency, which can lead to a disorder characterized by amnesia, apathy and disorientation
  • Ulcers
  • Gastritis (inflammation of stomach walls)
  • Malnutrition
  • Cancer of the mouth and throat
  • More info available at http://www.drugfreeworld.org/drugfacts/alcohol/short-term-long-term-effects.html

I am a recovering alcoholic (since 1982) and know first hand how Alcohol another drunk cartoonprobably caused me to need a heart transplant and cigarettes left me with serious Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (COPD).   Since I began Blogging in November of 2007, I have published six posts on alcohol’s deadly effects on internal organs.  They are Alcohol and Drugs – Cunning, Mysterious, Deadly; Alcohol May Have Ruined My Heart, How Much Do You Drink; Think Outside the Bottle; Should Alcoholics Get Liver Transplants and How Alcohol Can Kill Your Liver and You. 

These posts have generated numerous responses and questions.  The most common question, though, is, “How can I tell if I am an alcoholic?  A simple answer  is, “If Alcohol is causing problems you  have an alcohol problem!” 

The “Gold Standard” of the treatment industry is the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST).  The National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence at  http://www.ncadd-sfv.org/downloads/mast_test.pdf  is a great resource  if you want more information.   I have copied the test and printed it below.  You can take it in the privacy of your home and grade yourself according to the instructions which follow the test.

In order for the results to be accurate your answers must be absolutely truthful, you do no good by lying to yourself so BE HONEST!  I hope you find this information helpful.  

If you take the test and determine that you  need help a good starting point is the Substance Abuse and  Mental Health Services Administration of the U.S. Government (SAMHSA)  http://ncadi.samhsa.gov/links/

 MICHIGAN ALCOHOLISM SCREENING TEST (MAST)

 

Please check one response for each item.

 

1. Do you feel you are a normal drinker? (“normal” – drink as much or less than most other

Yes

No

2. Have you ever awakened the morning after some drinking the night before and found that you could not remember a part of the evening?

Yes

No

3. Does any near relative or close friend ever worry or complain about your drinking?

Yes

No

4. Can you stop drinking without difficulty after one or two drinks?

Yes

No

5. Do you ever feel guilty about your drinking?

Yes

No

6. Have you ever attended a meeting of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA)?

Yes

No

7. Have you ever gotten into physical fights when drinking?

Yes

No

8. Has drinking ever created problems between you and a near relative or close friend?

Yes

No

9. Has any family member or close friend gone to anyone for help about your drinking?

Yes

No

10. Have you ever lost friends because of your drinking?

Yes

No

11. Have you ever gotten into trouble at work because of drinking?

Yes

No

12. Have you ever lost a job because of drinking?

Yes

No

13. Have you ever neglected your obligations, your family, or your work for two or more days in a row because you were drinking?

Yes

No

14. Do you drink before noon fairly often?

Yes

No

15. Have you ever been told you have liver trouble such as cirrhosis?

Yes

No

16. After heavy drinking have you ever had delirium tremens (D.T.’s), severe shaking, visual or auditory (hearing) hallucinations?

Yes

No

17. Have you ever gone to anyone for help about your drinking?

Yes

No

18. Have you ever been hospitalized because of drinking?

Yes

No

19. Has your drinking ever resulted in your being hospitalized in a psychiatric ward?

Yes

No

20. Have you ever gone to any doctor, social worker, clergyman or mental health clinic for help with any emotional problem in which drinking was part of the problem?

Yes

No

21. Have you been arrested more than once for driving while under the influence of alcohol?

Yes

No

22. Have you ever been arrested, even for a few hours, because of other behavior while drinking?

Yes

No

About Scoring this Alcoholism Test Questionnaire

This quiz is scored by allocating 1 point to each ‘yes’ answer — except for questions 1 and 4, where 1 point is allocated for each ‘no’ answer — and totaling the responses.

So in other words, please score one point if you answered the following:

1) No

2) Yes

3) Yes

4) No

5-22) Yes

(Note that this is the current revised version of the MAST; the original MAST included 25 questions and used a more complex scoring method.)

Your Alcoholism Test Score

0-2 = No Apparent Problem

3-5 = Early or Middle Problem Drinker

6+ = Problem Drinker

Please comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors.  On-line registration can be done at www.donatelife.net  Whenever you can, help people formally register.  There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance.  If you convince one person to be a donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives.  Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  

You are also invited to join Facebook’s Organ Transplantation Initiative (OTI) a 3,400 member  group dedicated to providing help and information to donors, donor families, transplant patients and families, caregivers and all other interested parties.  Your participation is important if we are to influence decision makers to support efforts to increase organ donation and support organ regeneration, replacement and research efforts. 

 bob minus Jay full shotBob Aronson is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder and primary author of the blogs on this site and the founder of Facebook’s over 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative group.

Now retired and living in Jacksonville, Florida with his wife Robin he spends his time advocating for patients with end stage diseases and for organ recipients.  He is also active in helping his wife with her art business at art festivals and on her Rockin Robin Prints site on Etsy. 

Bob is a former journalist, Governor’s Communication Director and international communications consultant.

 

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