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Our Hospitals are Killing us, But Where’s the Outrage?


By Bob Aronson

This blog is dedicated to friends Kerry and Marsh Wick. Marsh, who underwent surgery in a local hospital, contracted an infection while there and died a while back. His wife Kerry, who was constantly at his side hopes that a more informed public will lead to fewer such cases.

'The patient in the next bed is highly infectious. Thank God for these curtains.'

Most of us still believe that hospitals are places that help the sick and dying get well. But are they? If you look at the most recent patient safety data one can’t help but arrive at the conclusion that there are safer places to be than hospitals. Here are some sobering facts.

Preventable medical errors are the No. 3 killer in the U.S. – following only heart disease and cancer – and claiming 400,000 lives a year.

 

400,000 people die each year in American hospitals due to preventable errors. Preventable errors — but there is no public outrage, it doesn’t lead the news each night and no politician is using that issue to get elected.

Ok, If that number doesn’t shock you, let’s put it in terms that will. The Airbus A380 is a double-deck, wide-body, four-engine jet airliner and is the world’s airplane crashlargest providing seating for 525 people in a typical three-class configuration. In order to kill 400,000 passengers a year, 761 of these monstrous jets would have to crash every year…761, that’s over two a day. There aren’t that many A380s in the world. Probably never will be.

So if planes were falling out of the sky at that rate, would there be congressional investigations, demonstrations in the streets, charges of criminal misconduct and airlines going out of business faster than you can say your own name. Pilots, co-pilots, airline executives, airline mechanics, air traffic controllers and even airport managers would be going to jail, but because that same number of people die due to errors in hospitals there is virtually no public outrage. Maybe old Uncle Joe Stalin who killed millions of his own people had it right when he said, “One death is a tragedy; a million is a statistic.”

If this was happening to airplanes it would be a lead story on every newscast and in every newspaper every day. So don’t you think just a little outrage is in order? 1,000 of our friends and neighbors die every day from preventable yes, preventable causes. But, if the cost of human life doesn’t get your attention, how about this. Preventable medical errors cost you and me over one trillion dollars a year. Yes, that’s trillion with a T, a thousand billion.

Killing patients at the rate of 400,000 a year has caused preventable medical errors to become the third leading cause of death in the United States, right behind heart disease and cancer.

So you likely are asking yourself, “Just exactly what is a medical error?” Well, there are thousands of them. I’ll give you just a few and you’ll soon realize that if you can imagine it, it likely has happened.

  • Treating the Wrong Patient. If your identity gets mixed up with someone else’s, you can get the wrong medications or even the wrong surgery.
  • Surgical Souvenirs. Surgical tools or other objects are left inside people after surgery far more often than you’d like to think.
  • Air Bubbles in Blood. If the hole in your chest isn’t sealed correctly (airtight) after a chest tube is removed, air bubbles can enter the wound and cut off blood supply to your lungs, heart, kidneys and brain — a life-threatening event.
  • Operating on the Wrong Body Part. It can happen if a surgeon misreads your chart, or if the chart is incorrect.
  • Infection Infestation. Hospital-acquired infections (HAIs) are alarmingly common. Many people are admitted infection free, but partially because of antibiotic resistant bugs and partly because of sheer carelessness many of them acquire several infections and far too many die as a result.

Ok…you got the idea. Pretty gruesome, huh?   So let’s talk about infections, the point of this blog.

I am the retired founder of the over 4,000 member Facebook support group, Organ Transplant Initiative. Recently during a discussion of HAIs, one of our members posted this horror story, unlike so many others he lived to tell it.

“Back at the time of my rapidly progressing illness and eventual transplants I went into the hospital with ONE infection acquired from contaminated soil it’s believed. After being in a local hospital for over a month I had no less than 15 other bacterial and fungal infections. Some acquired while beingcanada-hospital-deaths operated on. That particular hospital was cited for their infection issues too. One of the things uncovered was they were using mesh for hernia type repairs and then autoclaving the unused portion and repackaging it. That is absolutely forbidden.”

 

The September 2015 edition of Consumers Rconsumer reportseports Magazine includes a major report on HAIs. This is a story everyone ought to read and soon. I will report some of my personal research findings later but CR did such a good job of framing the issue, I’ve included the first couple of paragraphs here.

The Rise of Superbugs

“In the ongoing war of humans vs. disease-causing bacteria, the bugs are gaining the upper hand. Deadly and unrelenting, they’re becoming more and superbugsmore difficult to kill. You might think of hospitals as sterile safety zones in that battle. But in truth, they are ground zero for the invasion.

Though infections are just one measure of a hospital’s safety record, they’re an important one. Every year about 700,000 people in the U.S. develop infections during a hospital stay, and about 75,000 die with them, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). That’s more than twice the number of people who die each year in car crashes. And many of those illnesses and deaths can be traced back to the use of antibiotics, the very drugs that are supposed to fight the infections.”

What’s shocking is that the harm caused by these infections is mostly preventable. The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) in Atlanta, Georgia says healthcare facility surveys indicate a grave situation that is getting worse (HAI)prevalence survey). patient deaths Based on a large sample of U.S. acute care hospitals, the survey found that on any given day, about 1 in 25 hospital patients has at least one healthcare-associated infection. There were an estimated 722,000 HAIs in U.S acute care hospitals in 2011. About 75,000 hospital patients with HAIs died during their hospitalizations. More than half of all HAIs occurred outside of the intensive care unit.

This is the official U.S. Government estimate of infections occurring in Acute Care Hospitals in the United States.

Pneumonia 157,500
Gastrointestinal Illness 123,100
Urinary Tract Infections 93,300
Primary Bloodstream Infections 71,900
Surgical site infections from any inpatient surgery157,500
Other types of infections 118,500
Estimated total number of infections in hospitals 721,800
To read the full report, please visit: CDC HAI Prevalence Survey
Magill SS, Edwards JR, Bamberg W, et al. Multistate Point-Prevalence Survey of Health Care–Associated Infections.  N Engl J Med 2014;370:1198-208.

  • And here is some other startling information. Did you know you are at risk even while in the shower? Studies indicate that moisture-loving bacteria living in showerheads include huge populations of potential pathogens and, they can be quite different from their relatives who live on shower curtains just a few feet away.
  • A common misconception is that germs have very short life spans, but that’s simply not true. Drug-resistant staph germs can live for up to a week on some common furniture fabrics. Strep germs can survive for months on a dry surface. You simply cannot overdo cleaning or washing your hands. Who knows whose life you might save by doing so…it could be yours or someone very dear to you.

Raw numbers are cold and impersonal, the human side of the equation is anything but. Here are but a few real experiences that were posted on Facebook’s Organ Transplant Initiative support group

  • On my Father’s death certificate, it actually says “Health Care Aquired pneumonia”.I asked my doc what that’s all about (Dad died from complications from cancer) He said that more and more these days, they are putting that on death certificathospital acquired infectionses because they are required to by law.

I got C-DIFF (Clostridium difficile colitis is an infection of the colon) and I’m in good health, one year ago this month I was in hospital for 10 days- in the ICU for 3. They couldn’t figure it out- infectious disease came in every day- it’s scary out there!!!

***Editor’s note. The law requires healthcare facilities to report hospital or healthcare acquired infections (HAI) and to include them on the death certificate if, in fact, they caused the death. The doctor’s explanation that they are required to do that is fudging the facts. They are only required to do that if an HAI actually was the cause of death. No healthcare facility likes talking about a problem that may be one of their own making, so downplaying it as a government requirement removes them of complicity.

  • My husband was so deconditioned by the time he was able to be released post-transplant, that he had to go to an LTAC (Long Term Acute Care Hospital…aka as “hell”) At one point I told the person who called herself a nurse that he had managed to live, contrary to everyone’s expectations, and survive a liver transplant, and now “they” were going to kill him through neglect). Sadly, this is one of the circumstances that very ill transplant patients face. My only advice is be very vigilant. Take notes. Take pictures. Ask questions. Keep a journal. But for the attention of the ONE full-time physician and the contracted therapy staff, I’m really not sure he would have survived there.

Here are some examples of preventable contagion.

  • A cleaning person enters your hospital room, puts on gloves and empties the trash. The trash could include old dressings contaminated with various bodily fluids and other infectious material. Then without glovedchanging gloves starts a new box of facial tissue and opens rolls of toilet paper and paper towels. That worker has just used the same gloves on everything he/she touched  — and those items will then be used on your face and other sensitive areas.
  • Also, consider this. How many times have you seen a urinal sitting on the bedside table that swings over the bed? That table is where they place your food.
  • As these infections become more common it is incumbent on all of us to be more aggressive in demanding better infection control procedures. When you see an infraction, report it to the offending person’s supervisor. Hospital workers must follow strict hand washing procedures, change gloves often, clean flat surfaces more than once a day and NEVER allow urinals to come in contact with any other human especially those who are untrained and unprotected. As for patients, we had better use every precaution we can and the best of all of them is frequent hand washing.

Hospital Acquired Infections are a very real and constant threat, but prevention efforts appear to be paying off. The numbers aren’t big yet, but it should come as a relief to many that they are headed downward. By clicking on the following link you can get a detailed summary of the progress being made in the fight against HAIs.

HAI Progress Report

The CDC National and State Healthcare-Associated Infections Progress Report is a report that gives a closer look at the healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) most commonly reported to CDC using the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN). This is an annual report that describes national and state infection prevention progress.

The current report is based on 2013 data. On the national level, the report includes these highlights.

  • progress reportA 46 percent decrease in CLABS (Central Line Associated Bloodstream Infections)between 2008 and 2013

A 19 percent decrease in SSIs related to the 10 select procedures tracked in the report between 2008 and 2013 (An SSI is an infection that happens after surgery affecting the part of the body where the surgery was performed. Some SSIs are superficial skin infections, while others are more serious and involve tissue under the skin or organs)

  • A 6 percent increase in CAUTI between 2009 and 2013; although initial data from 2014 seem to indicate that these infections have started to decrease (CAUTI = Cather Associated Urinary Tract Infections).
  • An 8 percent decrease in hospital-onset MRSA bacteremia between 2011 and 2013 (Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aurens)
  • A 10 percent decrease in hospital-onset C. Diff infections between 2011 and 2013

While blogs like this can shine a spotlight on certain problems, we cannot even begin to give you all the information you need so you can decide which hospital is best for you. All we can do is offer you information that will lead you to the information you seek.

There are several organizations that gather information on Patient Safety for nearly every hospital in America. Some, like Consumer Reports require you to subscribe before giving you access. Others offer you access to a point and then place conditions on further cooperation on their part. If you Google “Compare hgoogleospital patient safety records” you’ll get plenty of hits to explore. A warning; The process can be time consuming, confusing, frustrating and may even result in inaccurate information.  You may even have to do some studying in order to understand the information you find.

I did much of what I suggested to you. It took many hours and I cannot guarantee accuracy. I tried hard to achieve that goal but when there are as many disparate sources of information as there are on this particular topic it all boils down to an educated crap shoot.

One of the best resources I found for comparing hospital patient safety records is this one.  http://tinyurl.com/q3gytkz but if you find it inadequate and not meeting your needs, then look around, there are plenty of other resources.

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bob aronsonBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,200 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes. Then, when registered, tell your family about your decision so there is no confusion when the time comes.

 

From Farm to Fork — How Safe Is Our Food?


Food safety cartoonThe very food that we need to help us grow and live, could also cause us to become ill and die.   Food — we cannot live without it, but it can pose great danger.   Let’s look at cold hard reality.  Our food supply, our food storage systems and our cooking and eating habits may be responsible for a great deal of misery.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that contaminated food sickens approximately 76 million Americans, leading to some 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.

Food safety is particularly important to anyone with a take proactive measurescompromised immune system because we just don’t have the ability to fight infections whether they are bacterial or viral.  Certainly people who have had organ transplants fall into that category.  Transplant recipients must be especially careful.

As I started to research this posting the first question that popped into my mind was, “Which foods are most likely to make me sick. I found this list of the top ten from the Center for Science in the Public Interest as reprinted in the Fiscal Times

1) Leafy Greensleafy greens

Lettuce and spinach may be on the top of most nutritionists’ lists, but they’re also among the foods most linked to outbreaks of illness. The contaminations often starts at the farm through contact with wild animals or manure.

*Source: The Center for Science in the Public Interest

– See more at: http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Media/Slideshow/2013/12/02/10-Foods-Most-Likely-Make-You-Sick#sthash.CTYjKR8I.dpuf

2) Eggs

The risk for salmonella makes eggs the second-most popular source of food-based illnesses. Consumers can protect themselves by fully cooking all eggs and eating or storing eggs promptly after cooking.

3) Tuna

tunaIf not properly stored immediately after being caught, tuna begins to decay and can release scrombotoxin, which can cause food poisoning.

4) Oysters

Raw or undercooked oysters can breed vibrio bacteria, which can cause mild food poisoning in healthy individuals and life-threatening illness among those with a weakened immune system. Best practices in preparing oysters is to discard any open shells before cooking, and any shells that didn’t open while cooking.

5) Potatoes

Baked potatoes become breeding grounds for botulism when they’re wrapped in foil and left out to cool too long. Unwrap potatoes after baking them, and store them in a cool, dark place before cooking.

6) Cheesecheese

Sticking with pasteurized cheese greatly reduces the risk of bacteria, but some soft cheeses—even those made with pasteurized cheese—are vulnerable to contamination during the cheese-making process.

7) Ice Cream

Everyone may scream for this summer treat, but when it’s made with undercooked eggs the cold stuff can become dangerous. Even store-bought ice cream can breed bacteria when it’s put back in the freezer after unfreezing.

8) Tomatoes

Salmonella can contaminate tomatoes on the farm via the roots, flowers or cracks in the skin. If an infected tomato is eaten raw, it has a high risk of infecting the person who consumers it.

9) Sprouts

utsThe humid settings ideal for cultivating sprouts are also model conditions for salmonella, listeria and E. Coli. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those with a weakened immune systems should avoid eating sprouts all together.

10) Berries

Strawberries, blackberries, and blueberries have been linked to a number of food-borne illness outbreaks in recent year. Last summer, a hepatitis A outbreak the sickened 150 people was traced back to frozen organic berries.

The Importance of Temperature

thermometerInadequate food temperature control is the most common factor contributing to food borne illness. Disease causing bacteria grow particularly well in foods high in protein such as meats, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, cooked vegetables such as beans, and cooked cereal grains such as rice. Because of the high potential for rapid bacterial growth in these foods they are known as “potentially hazardous foods.”

Temperature Danger Zone

The temperature range at which bacteria grow best in potentially hazardous foods is between 41F. and 140F. The goal of all temperature controls is to either keep foods entirely out of this “danger zone” or to pass foods through this “danger zone” as quickly as possible.

So now you know which foods may pose the greatest threat to your health, but there are other factors that should concern us as well.  For example:

America’s food safety system has not been fundamentally modernized in more than 100 years.

Twenty states and D.C. did not meet or exceed the national average rate for being able to identify the pathogens responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks in their states.

Ensuring the public can quickly and safely receive medications during a major health emergency is one of the most serious challenges facing public health officials.  Sixteen states have purchased less than half of their share of federally-subsidized antivirals to use during a pandemic flu outbreak.

The main culprits are familiar. They include:

  • lmonellaSalmonella, bacteria that cause over 1.5 million illnesses per year. These commonly reside in uncooked poultry and eggs. Recent outbreaks have been linked to peanut butter, alfalfa sprouts and tomatoes.
  • E. coli 0157:H7, a dangerous bacterial strain that can cause kidney failure, turns up disproportionately in ground beef. Lately it’s been linked to spinach and pre-made cookie dough. (For a complete list, see the full report, which details also the geographical distribution of food-borne illnesses in the U.S.) You can read and learn more here http://tinyurl.com/k64har2

There are three types of hazards in a food manufacturing process: physical, chemical and biological. Foreign objects are the most obvious evidence of a contaminated product and are therefore most likely to be reported by production or by consumer complaints. However, they are also less likely than chemical or biological contaminants to affect large numbers of people.

Attributing illness to foods is a challenge for several reasons.  There are thousands of different foods, and we eat many varieties prepared in different ways, even in a single meal.  For the vast majority of foodborne illnesses, we simply don’t know which food is responsible for an illness.

One way to develop a fairly accurate estimate is to use  data collected during investigations of a food illness outbreak.   These investigations provide direct links between foodborne illnesses and which foods are responsible for them.

According to the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases, there are more than 250 known foodborne diseases. They can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Natural and manufactured chemicals in food products also can make people sick. Some diseases are caused by toxins or poisons from the disease-causing microbe or germ, others are caused by your body’s reaction to the germ.

foodborne diseaseTypes of Foodborne Diseases as supplied by the National Institutes of Health (click on each one for details including symptoms and treatment or click this link for the NIH website http://www.niaid.nih.gov/)

Botulism, Campylobacteriosis, E. coli, Hepatitis A, Norovirus Infection, Salmonellosis, Shigellosis, Prevention

So how do you avoid these unpronounceable diseases?  Besides the information provided on the links to each disease, you might also want to make note of the following helpful suggestions

No matter how busy you are, from top to bottom, a clean kitchen is a main line of defense for your family and the prevention of food poisoning.  You simply must eliminate the breeding grounds for dangerous bacteria.

  •  Wash your hands often – front and back, between fingers, under fingernails – in warm soapy water for at least 20 seconds (or two choruses of “Happy Birthday”) before and after every step in preparing or eating foods. That includes your kitchen helpers, such as children.
  • Clean all work surfaces often to remove food particles and spills. Use hot, soapy water. Keep nonfood items – mail, newspapers, purses – off counters and away from food and utensils. Wash the counter carefully before and after food preparation.
  • wash dishesWash dishes and cookware in the dishwasher or in hot, soapy water, and always rinse them well. Remember that chipped plates and china can collect bacteria.
  • Change towels and dishcloths often and wash them in the hot cycle of your washing machine. Allow them to dry out between each use. If they are damp, they’re the perfect breeding ground for bacteria.
  • Throw out dirty sponges or sterilize them by rinsing the sponge and microwaving it for about two minutes while still wet. Be careful, the sponge will be hot.

Pay close attention to the refrigerator and the freezer – shelves, sides and door – where foods are stored. Pack perishables in coolers while you clean or defrost your refrigerator or freezer.

Splatters inside your microwave can also collect bacteria, so keep it clean.

Physical Hazards

We’ve talked a lot about diseases and illnesses but our health is also subject to physical hazards.  You can view a University of Nebraska Slide show on the subject here: http://tinyurl.com/k6k4qow

What is a physical hazard?

We’ve all heard the stories about Rocks, insects and other things showing up in soda and beer cans.  While those instances are rare, they still happen.  Any extraneous object or foreign matter in food which may cause illness or injury to a person consuming the product is a physical hazard. These objects include bone or bone chips, metal flakes or fragments, injection needles, BB’s or shotgun pellets, pieces of product packaging, stones, glass or wood fragments, insects, personal items, or any other foreign matter not normally found in food.

The 8 most common food categories implicated in reported foreign object complaints are bakery products, soft drinks, vegetables, infant’s foods, fruits, cereals, fishery products and chocolate and cocoa products.  Below you will find a list of hazards, their effect and the treatment.  You can find more detailed information by clicking on this link http://tinyurl.com/mbktawq

These materials have been found in food and can cause severe trauma, bleeding, cuts and even death.  In many cases surgery is required to correct the damage caused by; Glass, wood, stones, bullets, BBs, needles, jewelry, metal, .Insects and other contaminated material, building materials, bone, plastic and personal effects

As with any topic it is sometimes difficult to separate fact from fiction.  There are so many rumors, old Wives tales and myths people often think they are doing the right thing when in fact they may be making matters worse.  We can’t dispel all the rumors, but we can address a few.

Food Safety Myths Exposed

http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/basics/myths/

We all do our best to serve our families food that’s safe and healthy, but some common myths about food safety might surprise you.

MYTH: Food poisoning isn’t that big of a deal. I just have to tough it out for a day or two and then it’s over.

FACT: Many people don’t know it, but some foodborne illnesses can actually lead to long-term health conditions, and 5,000 insectAmericans a year die from foodborne illness. Get the FACTs on long-term effects of food poisoning.

MYTH: It’s OK to thaw meat on the counter. Since it starts out frozen, bacteria isn’t really a problem.

FACT: Actually, bacteria grow surprisingly rapidly at room temperatures, so the counter is never a place you should thaw foods. Instead, thaw foods the right way.

MYTH When cleaning my kitchen, the more bleach I use, the better. More bleach kills more bacteria, so it’s safer for my family.

FACT: There is actually no advantage to using more bleach than needed. To clean kitchen surfaces effectively, use just one teaspoon of liquid, unscented bleach to one quart of water.

MYTH I don’t need to wash fruits or vegetables if I’m going to peel them.

FACT: Because it’s easy to transfer bacteria from the peel or rind you’re cutting to the inside of your fruits and veggies, it’simportant to wash all produce, even if you plan to peel it.

poultryMYTH: To get rid of any bacteria on my meat, poultry, or seafood, I should rinse off the juices with water first.

FACT: Actually, rinsing meat, poultry, or seafood with water can increase your chance of food poisoning by splashing juices (and any bacteria they might contain) onto your sink and counters. The best way to cook meat, poultry, or seafood safely is tomake sure you cook it to the right temperature.

MYTH: The only reason to let food sit after it’s been microwaved is to make sure you don’t burn yourself on food that’s too hot.

FACT: In FACT, letting microwaved food sit for a few minutes (“standing time”) helps your food cook more completely by allowing colder areas of food time to absorb heat from hotter areas of food.

MYTH: Leftovers are safe to eat until they smell bad.

FACT: The kinds of bacteria that cause food poisoning do not affect the look, smell, or taste of food. To be safe, use our Safe Storage Times chart to make sure you know the right time to throw food out.

MYTH: Once food has been cooked, all the bacteria have been killed, so I don’t need to worry once it’s “done.”

FACT: Actually, the possibility of bacterial growth actually increases after cooking, because the drop in temperature allows bacteria to thrive. This is why keeping cooked food warmed to the right temperature is critical for food safety.

MYTH: Marinades are acidic, which kills bacteria—so it’s OK to marinate foods on the counter.

FACT: Even in the presence of acidic marinade, bacteria can grow very rapidly at room temperatures. To marinate foods safely, it’s important to marinate them in the refrigerator.

MYTH: If I really want my produce to be safe, I should wash fruits and veggies with soap or detergent before I use them.

FACT: In FACT, it’s best not to use soaps or detergents on produce, since these products can linger on foods and are not safe for consumption. Using clean running water is actually the

cookie doughMYTH: Only kids eat raw cookie dough and cake batter. If we just keep kids away from the raw products when adults are baking, there won’t be a problem!

FACT: Just a lick can make you sick!
No one of any age should eat raw cookie dough or cake batter because it could contain germs that cause illness. Whether it’s pre-packaged or homemade, the heat from baking is required to kill germs that might be in the raw ingredients. The finished, baked, product is far safer – and tastes even better! So don’t do it! And remember, kids who eat raw cookie dough and cake batter are at greater risk of getting food poisoning than most adults are.

MYTH: When kids cook it is usually “heat and eat” snacks and foods in the microwave. They don’t have to worry about food safety – the microwaves kill the germs!

FACT: Microwaves aren’t magic!
It’s the heat the microwaves generate that kills the germs! Food cooked in a microwave needs to be heated to a safe internal temperature. Microwaves often heat food unevenly, leaving cold spots in food where germs can survive. Kids can use microwaves properly by carefully following package instructions. Even simple “heat and eat” snacks come with instructions that need to be followed to ensure a safe product. Use a food thermometer if the instructions tell you to!

MYTH: When kids wash their hands, just putting their hands under running water is enough to get the germs off.

How to wash handsFACT: Rubbing hands with water and soap is the best way to go!
Water is just part of what you need for clean hands! Washing hands properly is a great way to reduce the risk of food poisoning. Here’s how: Wet your hands with clean, running water and apply soap. Rub them together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of hands, between fingers, and under nails. Continue rubbing for at least 20 seconds. Sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice to time yourself! Rinse hands well under running water. Dry your hands using a clean towel, paper towel, or an air dryer.

MYTH: My kids only eat pre-packaged fruits and veggies for snacks because those snacks don’t need to be washed before they eat them.

FACT: Read your way to food safety!
Giving your kids healthy snacks is a big plus for them! But just because produce is wrapped, it doesn’t always mean it’s ready to eat as is. Read the label of your product to make sure it is says: “ready-to-eat,” “washed,” or “triple washed.” If it does, you’re good to go! If it doesn’t, wash your hands and then rinse the fruits or vegetables under running tap water. Scrub firm items, such as melons and cucumbers, with a clean produce brush. Dry with a clean cloth towel or paper towel to further reduce germs that may be present.

While federal, state and local agencies provide a valuable service with their contributions to our food safety, the primary responsibility is yours.  Too many of us become too careless with our food preparation and storage procedures and each of us needs to pay far more attention to the cleanliness of the areas in which we prepare food and to the cleanliness of the food itself.

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bob minus Jay full shotBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes.

EBOLA — WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW


By Bob Aronson

statue of libertyOver the years this blog has offered a lot of information on how to take care of your organs.  We believe strongly that the way to solve the shortage of transplantable organs is to 1) encourage donation and 2) do everything possible to reduce the demand.  That means we must continually be on guard  to prevent threats to our health and we depend on public health officials and the news media to provide us with that information.  Ebola is the latest threat and it’s a dandy. It can destroy all of your organs — all of them.

After watching the Ebola story develop in the past few weeks I came to the conclusion that we are getting mixed messages from a number of sources and the mass media doesn’t do a very good job of filtering them, they just hop,  skip and jump from one new development to another with little effort given to finding and tying loose ends.

To date most of the regular TV news stories on the Dallas, Texas Ebola incident lack detail and as a result serve no purpose but to inflame, confuse and cause panic.  Print stories have been better but it has been hard to find many really comprehensive reports.   That’s probably because Ebola is a moving target.  Just as I was about to publish this blog, there were two new developments.

The first new development is that one of the health care workers at the Dallas hospital where the first Ebola patient died, has tested positive for the Ebola Virus.  This is a breaking news story so it won’t be covered in detail here.  The second development today is from President Obama’s National Security advisor Susan Rice who is expressing some dismay at the sorry state of the world response to the Ebola Threat. She is not so subtly sounding the alarm and calling for “All hands on Deck.”

With the exception of some investigative or in-depth network reports, TV news channels have been saying pretty much the same thing.  As the story goes, a man who had recently traveled from Liberia in West Africa to Dallas, Texas checked into an emergency room at Presbyterian hospital there with a temperature of 103 degrees.  He was treated for a stomach virus and sent home.  That’s pretty much what most people know about the Dallas situation and the Ebola virus.  The story, though, is grossly incomplete.  That is not to say the hospital in question should be exonerated of any responsibility, they should not, but nothing is ever as simple as it sounds.

It is important first, to understand what we are dealing with.  Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF), caused by the Ebola virus, is a severe viral hemorrhagic disease characterized by initial fever and malaise followed by gastrointestinal symptoms, bleeding, shock, and multi-organ system failure. Over 25 different viruses cause viral hemorrhagic fever. Ebola virus is a member of the virus family Filoviridae, along with Marburg virus.

EHF is difficult to distinguish from a host of other febrile illnesses, at least early in the course of disease. Other viral hemorrhagic fevers need to be excluded, especially Marburg hemorrhagic fever, as well as malaria and typhoid fever.

Patients should be isolated and viral hemorrhagic fever precautions (face shields, surgical masks, double gloves, surgical gowns, and aprons) should be used to prevent transmission. As there is presently no antiviral drug available for EHF, treatment is supportive, following the guidelines for treatment of severe septicemia. Persons who had unprotected contact with someone with EHF should be monitored.  Case fatality rates vary consistently with the specific infecting virus, ranging from zero to over 80%.

I spent 25 years of my life as a communication consultant and specialized in working with health care organizations like infection controlclinics, hospitals, research centers, pharmaceutical companies, research labs and more.  I know how important infection/contagion control is in these facilities and how much time, effort and money is spent on programs to ensure patient safety.  That’s why what happened in Dallas with the Ebola patient stands out.  Numerous studies make it very clear that in the great majority of cases in which patient safety is at risk communication is the culprit.

While Ebola may sometimes be difficult to diagnose, every hospital and clinic in this country has check lists on contagious diseases and infections.  They do regular drills, have training sessions and should be well prepared for any eventuality.  What happened in Dallas shouldn’t have happened, but it did.  Now what?

Dr. Anthony FauciDr. Anthony Fauci from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) an acknowledged expert on infectious diseases says that while he understands our fears we also need to understand that what is happening in West Africa is because of the weaknesses in their health system.  “West Africa,” he says, “Is not the United States, we won’t have an outbreak. Scientists know how to stop the virus from spreading.”

While I hope he is right, I wish Dr. Fauci had not said that.  Knowing how to do something and actually accomplishing it may be worlds apart.  This isn’t just about the medical profession knowing what to do, it is about all of us knowing what to do and when — and then communicating properly and following the plan.  Nothing, Dr. Fauci, is as easy as it seems. and your overly simplistic assurances could be harmful, lulling us into a false sense of security. I’ll explain more shortly.

An ABC News report tells a story that differs from Dr. Fauci’s view.   The Network account quoted Dr. Ryan Stanton, an emergency room physician in Lexington, Kentucky, and spokesman for the American College of Emergency Physicians as saying, “We’re all a little bit on edge because we’ve never seen it before.  Stuff we’ve seen before, like heart attack and stroke, we recognize as soon as we walk in the door. For Ebola, it’s not going to come as naturally.  It’s not even a needle in a haystack,” he went on. “It’s a needle in a hayfield we’re trying to find.”  That statement kind of casts some doubt on Dr. Fauci’s position.  Add the Susan Rice comments to the mix and Dr. Fauci is sounding far too positive.  If after reading this far you think, “There’s more to the Ebola outbreak than meets the eye,” you’d be right.  There is.

The question on everyone’s mind is, “How could the ER people in Dallas have missed this case?  Well, they did not miss it, it kind of missed them.  Dallas presbyterian We have it on good authority that the Dallas ER nurse properly accounted for the feverish patient’s recent travel in Africa, but that information did not get communicated to the rest of the team. Instead, the patient was treated with antibiotics for a presumed run-of-the-mill stomach virus. So it appears that while the checklist was completed poor team communication prevented its proper execution.

It is entirely possible that the Nurse’ proper reaction was ignored for any number of reasons. 1) It came from a nurse, not a doctor (yes, there is institutional, professional arrogance) 2. The team was busy, tired and careless and chose to ignore the Nurse’ efforts and 3) the Nurse did not communicate with the right people and the communication was unclear, unreadable or could not be heard. I suspect that there might be a dozen more reasons or excuses as well.

I am not qualified to argue medical facts with Dr. Fauci — I don’t even want to and the reason is simple, he is right.  What he said is absolutely correct.  The medical profession does know how to stop Ebola.  What they don’t do very well,  is communicate what they know to those of us who don’t.

After 25  years of working as a communications coach and consultant to the medical profession I can tell you that communication is not one of their strong suits.  I have great respect for physicians and loved working with them but their ability to speak in understandable and memorable terms is not a well developed skill.  Think about your interactions with your doctors and how many times you leave his or her office saying, “I don’t think my questions got answered,” or, “What did he mean when he said,….”

But, let’s go back to the Dallas case.  I do not doubt that the Dallas medical team knew how to deal with Ebola.  The question that is at the core of the issue, though is, “How effective was the communication they used to put the systems in place to accomplish that end?  It is not their medical expertise I doubt, it is their ability to communicate what they know and suspect in an effective and understandable manner.   And — if the patient safety record in American health care institutions is any indication of that prowess then we are in a heap of trouble. This is where the Fauci assurances fall flat.  A 2013 story in Forbes Magazine said: http://www.forbes.com/sites/leahbinder/2013/09/23/stunning-news-on-preventable-deaths-in-hospitals/

Forbes logo“In 1999, Americans learned that 98,000 people were dying every year from preventable errors in hospitals. That came from a widely touted analysis by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) called To Err Is Human. This was the “Silent Spring” of the health care world, grabbing headlines for revealing a serious and deadly problem that required policy and action.

As it turns out, those were the good old days.

According to a new study just out from the prestigious Journal of Patient Safety, four times as many people die from preventable medical errors than we thought.  That could be as many as 440,000 deaths a year.

With these latest revelations, medical errors now claim the spot as the third leading cause of death in the United States, dwarfing auto accidents, diabetes and everything else besides Cancer and heart disease.

These people are not dying from the illnesses that caused them to seek hospital care in the first place. They are dying from mishaps that hospitals could have prevented. What do these errors look like? The sponge left inside the surgical patient, prompting weeks of mysterious, agonizing abdominal pain before the infection overcomes bodily functions. The medication injected into a baby’s IV at a dose calculated for a 200 pound man. The excruciating infection from contaminated equipment used at the bedside. Sadly, over a thousand people a day are dying from these kinds of mistakes.

If you aren’t alarmed enough that our country is burying a population the size of Oakland every year, try this: you are paying for it. Hospitals shift the extra cost of errors onto the patient, the taxpayer and/or the business that buys health benefits for the infected patient. My nonprofit, which provides a calculator of the hidden surcharge Americans pay for hospital errors, finds most companies are paying millions or even billions of extra dollars for the cost of harming their employees.

No Cure,  No Vaccine Because There’s No Money In It

A recurring question in the case of Ebola or diseases like it is, “Why don’t we have a vaccine or a cure?”  Part of the answer to that orphan diseasesquestion is that diseases like Ebola and Marburg fall into the “Orphan disease” category. These are very rare diseases.  The rarity of the diseases provides little incentive for private industry to invest in research and development because the cost per prescription or treatment per patient would be so high few could afford them.  There is some government assistance for research but nowhere near enough.

The Orphan Drug Act of 1983 http://tinyurl.com/3vkffup provides incentives for drug companies to develop treatments for rare diseases. Since the Act was signed into federal law, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved more than 200 treatments for rare diseases.

While that number sounds good it is small when put in perspective because there are about 7,000 orphan diseases and some are quite familiar like:

  • Cystic fibrosis, which affects the respiratory and digestive systems.
  • Huntington disease which affects the brain and nervous system.
  • Single genes are also responsible for some rare, inherited types of Examples of these are the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, in which certain mutations increase the risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancers, and the FAP gene, in which mutations increase the risk for hereditary colon cancer.

You can find more information here http://rarediseases.info.nih.gov/about-ordr/pages/31/frequently-asked-questions

As noted the Orphan Drug Act is why there is any activity around Orphan diseases, but it is nowhere near enough because there are so many of them.

Thanks to marketing campaigns aimed at people exposed to asbestos we are all likely familiar with the disease called mesothelioma — perhaps the best-known orphan disease in the nation.

About 3,000 patients are diagnosed with mesothelioma each year, placing it well within the U.S. definition of a rare or orphan disease as one that affects no more than 200,000 patients at a given time.  To further complicate matters there are several different forms of the disease so what might work to control one, likely wouldn’t for another. Patients with mesothelioma live for 1 to 2 years past their diagnosis.
mesothelioma“One of the difficult aspects of mesothelioma is that it often not diagnosed until it is in the later stages, and it is a very aggressive cancer,” says Joe Belluck, a New York mesothelioma lawyer.

The disease is difficult to detect since symptoms come after asbestos fibers have invaded organ linings and often mimic that of a bad cold or virus. It also surfaces decades after exposure to asbestos, so it has historically affected an older population with age-related health

It is a very deadly form of cancer and one that falls into the “Orphan” category. Mesothelioma is listed as an orphan disease on registries like rarediseases.org maintained by the National Organization for Rare Diseases (NORD).

Because it affects fewer than 200,000 people at a given time (due to its high mortality rate), treatments specifically for mesothelioma are eligible for orphan drug funding from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Under the Orphan Drug Act, companies involved in developing and testing drugs, biologics, and other treatments specifically to treat rare diseases can get tax credits and other incentives to continue development them including:

  • 7 years of exclusive marketing for the drug
  • Tax credits to cover half the cost of clinical investigations
  • Waiving user fees

As you can see, there is far more to the Ebola story than meets the eye.  It is a complex issue because Ebola is an Orphan disease that attacks in a multitude of ways and is not always easy to identify.  So what can you do?  Be informed. Don’t wait for information, seek it out, you might save your life and the lives of people you love.  Below are some essential facts, but click on the links, too.

Here are some fast facts on Ebola from CNN:  http://tinyurl.com/npqfzt2

CNN Eb0la Fact Sheet

Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a disease caused by one of five different Ebola viruses. Four of the strains can cause severe illness inCNN humans and animals. The fifth, Reston virus, has caused illness in some animals, but not in humans.

The first human outbreaks occurred in 1976, one in northern Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo) in Central Africa: and the other, in southern Sudan (now South Sudan). The virus is named after the Ebola River, where the virus was first recognized in 1976,according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Ebola is extremely infectious but not extremely contagious. It is infectious, because an infinitesimally small amount can cause illness. Laboratory experiments on nonhuman primates suggest that even a single virus may be enough to trigger a fatal infection.

Instead, Ebola could be considered moderately contagious, because the virus is not transmitted through the air, well at least not much.  A sneeze could spread it if the droplets  from an infected person come in contact with someone who is not, but that’s a very short distance.  In the most contagious diseases, such as measles or influenza, virus particles are airborne for longer distances and much more time.

Humans can be infected by other humans if they come in contact with body fluids from an infected person or contaminated objects from infected persons. Humans can also be exposed to the virus, for example, by butchering infected animals.

While the exact reservoir of Ebola viruses is still unknown, researchers believe the most likely natural hosts are fruit bats.

Symptoms of Ebola typically include: weakness, fever, aches, diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain. Additional experiences include rash, red eyes, chest pain, throat soreness, difficulty breathing or swallowing and bleeding (including internal).

Typically, symptoms appear 8-10 days after exposure to the virus, but the incubation period can span two to 21 days.

Unprotected health care workers are susceptible to infection because of their close contact with patients during treatment.

Ebola is not transmissible if someone is asymptomatic or once someone has recovered from it. However, the virus has been found in semen for up to three months.

Deadly human Ebola outbreaks have been confirmed in the following countries: Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Gabon, South Sudan, Ivory Coast, Uganda, Republic of the Congo (ROC), Guinea and Liberia.

According to the World Health Organization, “there is no specific treatment or vaccine,” and the fatality rate can be up to 90%. Patients are given supportive care, which includes providing fluids and electrolytes and food.

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I  hope this report helped to clarify the Ebola issue. If you have comments make them in the space provided or contact me directly at bob@baronson.org.bob cropped smaller

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Stop Eating What’s Killing You! Great Tasting Food Ideas ~ Less Salt and Sugar


By Bob Aronson

ambulance

Tired of paying for expensive prescription drugs?   Sick to death of the high cost of health care?  Frustrated with trying to find affordable insurance that actually covers something? Upset because your employer doesn’t offer insurance?

There is a solution…at least a partial solution and that is to take better care of yourself.  Mos of our ills are brought on  by our lifestyles by the fact that we eat wrong, don’t exercise and abuse our bodies in a million other ways.

Sugar is not healthy. We know that products loaded with sugar are not healthy and we know that foods with saturated fat are not healthy but we eat them anyway.  Why is that?  Simple answer.  They are fast, easy and they really taste good!

hands holding a big mac

The rap on eating healthy is that really healthy stuff usually doesn’t taste very good.  Let’s face it, when you take away the salt, fat and sugar food can be pretty bland.  The taste buds send frantic messages to the brain pleading for relief, “C’mon…just a little more salt…blechhh this tastes awful.”

What we are really saying is that compared to what we have been eating a healthier diet has no taste at all.  The fact is the taste of healthier foods is quite distinct, it’s just that all that salt, sugar and fat have masked it and your taste buds need some retraining.

Years ago when I was first told that I might need a heart transplant some day and that I had to change my diet if I wanted to live long enough to get one I was advised to severely limit the amount of sodium in my diet.  At the most I could have 2,000  milligrams (2 grams} of sodium per day.  When you consider that a Papa John’s 14 inch Pepperoni Pizza with original crust has 825 mgs of sodium per slice and you rarely eat just one slice, you could easily consume your entire day’s allocation of sodium at one sitting.papa johns pizza 2

I used to love salt and still do but I have learned to restrain myself.  I was one of those guys who salted everything even before I tasted it.  I would put salt on a sausage, pepperoni and extra cheese pizza as soon as it arrived at the table.  I used to put salt in my beer, too, so when I could no longer do that all my favorite foods suddenly tasted terrible.  That’s when a huge neon sign appeared over my head flashing the message, “It wasn’t the pIzza you loved, it was the salt!”salt shakerWanting to live a little longer I took the advice of my physicians and I cut salt intake in two ways.  First I did not add salt to anything.  Secondly I began to study the labels on food in the grocery store. food label Limiting yourself to 2 grams of sodium a day is very difficult and for a while you will not like what you are eating – it tastes bland.  your taste buds will scream for salt as loudly as a heroin addicts brain screams for narcotic relief.  Slowly, though, your taste buds recover from a decades long carpet bombing of sodium … and the real taste of food begins to emerge.  Green beans have a distinct taste; pasta, has a taste of its own; even a good lean steak has a unique taste when you remove the salt and the steak sauce and the ketchup, too…sorry.

Don’t get me wrong, we need salt to keep our bodies functioning properly but, we don’t need much (e.g., between about 180 mg and 500 mg per day).

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) The Institute of Medicine recommends 1500 mg of sodium per day as the Adequate Intake level for most Americans and advises everyone to limit sodium intake to less than 2300 mg per day, the Tolerable Upper Limit.sodium facts for the U.S.

Once you overcome the taste issue you will begin to enjoy food again. But you don’t have to do it cold turkey.  There are plenty of good substitutes for salt that add a dash of extra flavor without being a threat to your health.  For example

Here’s some advice from the famed Cleveland Clinic

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/prevention/askdietician/ask1_02.aspx

Ideally, the best way to go is completely “Salt Free.” Instead of mimicking the taste of sodium with salt substitutes, start experimenting with other more flavorful herbs and spices to add zest to your meals. Try fresh garlic or garlic powder, lemon juice, flavored vinegar, salt-free herb blends, cumin, nutmeg, cinnamon, fresh ground pepper, tarragon, oregano and many others to unleash the powerful flavors these salt-free herbs and spices have to offer.

Remember that a 2 gram sodium restriction includes the total sodium in your day – this includes the foods that you eat, not just the seasoning that you add. Be cautious of nutrition labels and keep foods under 140 mg or less which is considered a “low sodium food”.

Another reason for our poor eating habits is lack of time.  Everyone seems rushed with no time to be considering sodium, saturated fat or sugar content.  We just need something fast – but fast doesn’t have to mean unhealthy.

“Sometimes cooking takes a lot of time in our life, but we got some good news for you. We gathered an excellent list of cooking recipes which are easy to prepare. There are categories of receipts like Breakfast, Salad Entrees, Soups, Fish, Chicken and Turkey, Lean Meat, Vegetarian Entrees, Side Salad/Dressings, Side Vegetables, and Desserts. All easy healthy foods so you don’t even need to think about what to cook tonight!”

[Update: Try this lifehack article for an updated List of 100 healthy recipes that you can learn in 15 minutes
I edited the list so if you want the complete story click on this link: http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifehack/over-100-quick-and-easy-healthy-foods.html

Or…for great and flavorful healthy food ideas go directly to Recipesia dot com.  http://www.recipesia.com/

Breakfast

Grape Nuts Breakfast Bars

Foolproof Scrambled Eggs

Guacamole Omelet

Huevos Rancheros

Mission Fritada With Wine Syrup

Nest Eggs

Prickly Pear Eggs

Santa Fe Eggs

Scrambled Eggs With Shrimp And Sherry

Southwestern Eggs

Salad Entrees

Egg Jigglers

Easter Egg Salad

Minted Pea Salad

Dazzling Easter Eggs

Easter Bunny Salad

Easter Bunny Salad

Lemon Marshmallow Fluff

Lemon Lime Jell O Salad

Peach Jell O Salad

Pina Colada Salad

Soups

Polish Easter Soup

Sicilian Easter Soup

Majeiritsa (easter Lamb Soup)

Cream Of Mango Soup

Iced Papaya Soup

Raspberry Fuchsia Soup

Strawberry Peach Soup

Sweet Red Pepper And Crab Bisque

Creamed Tomato Bisque

Fish

Anchorage Baked Salmon

Cajun Style Baked Fish

Ranch Fish Fillets

Scalloped Salmon

Codfish Cakes

Colorado Deep Fry Fish Batter

Country Fried Catfish

Crispy Oven Fried Fish

Door County Fish Boil

Chicken and Turkey

Grilling

Grilling

Chicken With White Wine And Mushrooms

Cinnamon Garlic Roast Chicken

Roasted Chicken Oreganato

Lemon Chicken

Herbed Chicken Piccata

Barbecued Bundles

Barbecued Chicken

Lean Meat

Till We Meat Again

Meat Balls

Canadian Meat Pie

Meat Loaf Ricotta

Nalley Chili Meat Loaf

Stuffed Meat Loaf

Tropical Meat Loaf

Garden Meat Loaf

Italian Stuffed Meat Loaf

Mom’s Meat Loaf

Vegetarian Entrees

All Bean Chili

Deep Fried Masa Turnovers With Cheese

Green Chile Avocado Enchiladas

African Style Vegetarian Stew

Aztec Platter

Bean And Mushroom Stroganoff

Black Eyed Pea And Vegetable Stew

Bulghur Wheat “sausage” Patties

Carrot Rice Nut Burger

Cheese And Nut Loaf

Chile And Cheese Enchiladas

Side Salad/Dressings

Chinese Cabbage Salad

Creamy Romaine Salad – non-dairy

Cucumber, Seaweed Salad

Fresh Minted Garbanzo Salad

Great Antipasti Salad

Romaine & Avocado Salad

Tomato Dandelion Salad

Side Vegetables

Asian Mushroom Sauté

Calabacitas – Mexican flavored vegetable side dish

Cranberry Sauce

Healthy Mashed Sweet Potatoes – no dairy

Marinated Beets

Mediterranean Collard Greens

Mediterranean Kale

Mediterranean Spinach

Desserts

Almond Filled Cheesecake

Bailey’s Chocolate Mousse Cheesecake

Apple Normandy Cheesecake

Applesauce Cheesecake

Autumn Cheesecake

Avocado Cheesecake

Bailey’s Irish Cream Cheesecake

Banana Cream Cheesecake

Banana Peanut Cheesecake

Apricot Cheesecake

Baklava Cheesecake

Got some ideas for healthier living?  We’d like to hear them.  Please add your comments here or write to me directly bob@baronson.org if you have a blog idea or if you’d like to submit a guest blog.  Stay tuned for more on living healthy.  One way of solving the transplantable organ shortage is by reducing the demand.  By living healthy you do just that.

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bobBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

Mental Illness Myths Exploded — Music Therapy Can Help


“Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything.”

Plato

Mental Illness is as real as cancer — you can’t “think” your way out of it.

By Bob Aronson

Get over it!  emotional baggageIt’s all in your head,” was and is a common utterance by those who don’t understand that just because it is in your head doesn’t make it less real.  Will power cannot dislodge demons of the mind any more effectively than it can stop cancer.   Both are real, both are serious and treatment for both is available and necessary.

The difference between the two is that while we accept illnesses of the body as real illnesses we, as a society, have not yet fully accepted mental illness as a disease and until we do greater societal problems will ensue.

Both pre and post transplant patients suffer from depression.  Some suffer from other mental illnesses as well.  Just because we need or have had an organ or tissue transplants doesn’t mean we aren’t subject to all the ills that befall everyone else.  In reality we may be more susceptible because we have come face to face with death.  Many of us live with it for years.  You can’t get on the transplant list unless you have an end stage disease. That’s fancy doctor talk for, “You are dying.”

This blog is about one approach to helping people with emotional or other problems involving the brain…music.  Before we get into solutions, though, it is important to understand the problem.pencil optimism

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) says that although mental health and mental illness are related, they represent different psychological states.

Mental health isa state of well-being in which the individual realizes his or her own abilities, can cope with the normal stresses of life, can work productively and fruitfully, and is able to make a contribution to his or her community.”1 It is estimated that only about 17% of U.S adults are considered to be in a state of optimal mental health.2 There is emerging evidence that positive mental health is associated with improved outcomes.

Mental illness is defined as “collectively all diagnosable mental disorders” or “health conditions that are characterized by alterations in thinking, mood, or behavior (or some combination thereof) associated with distress and/or impaired functioning.”2 Depression is the most common type of mental illness, affecting more than 26% of the U.S. adult population.3 It has been estimated that by the year 2020, depression will be the second leading cause of disabimental illness montagelity throughout the world, trailing only ischemic heart disease.4

Evidence has shown that mental disorders, especially depressive disorders, are strongly related to the occurrence, successful treatment, and course of many chronic diseases including diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, asthma, and obesity5 and many risk behaviors for chronic disease; such as, physical inactivity, smoking, excessive drinking, and insufficient sleep.

Unfortunately public acceptance of mental illness treatment has been slow in coming despite the fact that many effective treatments have existed for a long time.  Often people who are affected don’t seek help because of the embarrassment of being labeled “mentally ill”

Mental Health America (MHA) is trying to dispel the myths surrounding mental illness.  The five most common are: (http://www.mentalhealthamerica.net/go/workplacewellness/5myths )

busting the myths

Myth #1: Mental illness is the same as mental retardation.

The Facts: Mental illness and mental retardation are entirely different disorders. Mental retardation is primarily characterized by limitations in intellectual functioning, while intellectual functioning varies among persons with persistent mental illness just as it does across the general population.

Myth #2: Recovery from mental illness is impossible.

The Facts: While these illnesses are persistent, research has shown that with treatment, the majority of people with mental illnesses achieve genuine improvement in their symptoms over time and lead stable, productive lives. As the treatment of mental illness has advanced, the focus of treatment has shifted from simply minimizing symptoms to true recovery-that is, the reintegration into mainstream society, including (and perhaps most importantly) the world of work.

Myth #3: Mentally ill and mentally restored employees (that is, those in whom mental illness is effectively treated) tend to be second-rate workers.

The Facts: Far from being inferior workers, individuals with mental illnesses may in fact be superior in many ways to their co-workers without mental illness. Employers who have hired these individuals report that their attendance and punctuality exceed the norm, and that their motivation, work quality, and job tenure is as good as — or better than — that of other employees. Research has shown that there is no difference between the productivity of workers with and without mental illness.

Myth #4: People with psychotic disabilities cannot tolerate stress on the job.

The Facts: The response to job-related stress, and precisely which factors will be perceived as stressful, vary among individuals with psychiatric disabilities just as they do among people without such disabilities. For all workers — with or without psychiatric disabilities — productivity is optimized when there is a close match between the employee’s needs and his or her working conditions.

Myth #5: Mentally ill and mentally restored individuals are unpredictable, potentially violent, and dangerous.

The Facts: This myth is reinforced by media portrayals of people with mental illnesses as frequently and randomly violent. However, a research literature review conducted at Cornell University found absolutely no evidence to support such portrayals. The fact is that the vast majority of individuals with psychiatric disabilities are neither dangerous nor violent.

we don't want you

So, Given that we understand the myths and can deal with them let’s look at one form of therapy that can be and has been very effective in some cases.

While mental illness was not an issue, a serious brain injury was in the case of former congresswoman Gabby Gifford  Gabby Giffodwho was seriously wounded when shot in the head in an attempted assassination.   Her therapists have used music to help her learn to walk and speak again, as well as give her an emotional boost along her stunningly difficult path.  If you want to learn more about the Gifford story click on this link from ABC TV news.

http://tinyurl.com/n3cuapy

The power of music

Music can help rewire the brain after a traumatic injury, stroke or accident. In all of us, Our own playlist of personal favorites can help to:colorful notes on staff

  • Trigger memories. Think of jingles that remind you of a company’s name, or that song that always takes you back to your senior year of high school.
  • Promote learning. Next time you have a phone number or list of terms to remember, try putting it to music. Elicit emotions. The movie industry has long known how to use background music to heighten terrifying, tragic or exhilarating moments.
  • Provide motivation. Chores can become an entirely different experience when set to an energetic beat. Improve coordination. If you hear music while you’re walking, you can’t help but to walk to the beat. That’s a biological process called “entraining,” in which a rhythm and melody pull us into synchrony with them.
  • Reduce stress and pain. Calming music can entrain you to breathe deeply and the memories music elicits can remind you of happier, more peaceful times and places.Source: Concetta Tomaino, executive director of the Institute for Music and Neurologic Function at the Beth Abraham Family of Health Services in New York.

Music holds a unique role in human life. Its rhythms help organize movements — almost no one can resist a good beat. Music brings up memories. And music, it seems, can help retrain the speech centers of the brain.

I could go on here and offer quote after quote about what music therapy is and does but the best way to for readers to know how it works is to listen to what patients have to say.  The American Music Therapy Association (AMTA) http://www.musictherapy.org/ has a section on its web site where patients relate their experience with music therapy.  Here are just a few, you can read more by going to the AMTA site.

Parent testimonial, written by Tamera Norris

Music has the power to enrich the mind of a child with autism. Many people with autism have limited verbal expression. They live a life of involuntary silence.road to recovery “After silence, that which comes nearest to expressing the inexpressible is music.” (Aldous Huxley) That is the reason why “music (became) the shorthand of (William’s) emotions.” (Leo Tolstoy) It gave him opportunities for speech, emotional contact and mental focus.

From the age of four through his current age of 16, William has taken a music bath once or twice a week at The Music Settlement. As Oliver Wendell Holmes once said, “…a music bath… is to the soul what the water bath is to the body.” Music has flown out, immersing restless feelings, calming William, minimizing his hesitation. Then it ebbed and he met the eyes of the therapist. With the guidance of Ronna Kaplan and other music therapists, William has developed, encouraged to tune his fine and gross motor skills. The therapy program made use of live and recorded music, pre-planned dialogues for the clients and sound effects. While learning to play instruments, William also learned life skills. “Music (became the soundtrack of (his) life.” (Dick Clark)

Being born with autism makes it difficult to interact with others or communicate verbally. It causes the affected person to be unaware of reacting in ways that others do not commonly react in society. Music therapy provided William a non-threatening environment in which to build relationships with peers, express himself verbally and nonverbally and learn to participate in socially acceptable ways. This was achieved through group therapy, as well as individualized sessions. Both forms were ideal for William, because individual lessons allowed him to learn at his own pace. These lessons were tailored to meet his needs. They helped him to learn to read music, follow a rhythm, and to respect the need to display the proper behavior in the proper situation. Small group therapy required him to learn to take turns and to be a focused member of a team. He had to use proper questions and verbal responses. He had to learn to be both leader and supportive member. This even carried over to life outside of The Music Settlement, as William auditioned for and earned a position on a regular team of drummers for his school. He was able to perform at the House of Blues in front of a large, noisy audience, with no problem. This was not something that he would have been able to withstand before his experiences in music therapy.

We are very pleased and thankful for the progress that William has made over the years and we foresee him continuing to flourish with additional music therapy. The combination of an excellent music therapy curriculum and an enthusiastic, care-giving staff, has enabled William not to just, “…go where a path might lead, but instead to go where there is no path and leave (his) trail.”  (Ralph Waldo Emerson)

I am closing with a short poem, expressing my feelings about The Music Settlement and its staff. It is simply entitled, Thank You.

Thank You

Music therapy teaches
Social skills.
It’s about communication.
It’s about what William’s taught,
In nurturing situations.
He’s learned patience
And tolerance,
Growing in many ways.
His social skills developed,
Made him what he is today.
So, thank you for your guidance,
As only music can touch.
Thank you for reaching our William,
Because it means so much.

A physician/patient  talks about his recovery.

R.B.Fratianne, MD.  Prof. of Surgery, CWRU Dir. Emeritus, Burn Center Metrohealth Med. Center.  I was deeply honored by the gracious invitation to attend this year’s annual meeting of The AMTA and receive the Advocate of the Year Award. At the meeting, I was impressed by the level of enthusiasm and dedication to excellence shown by the highly trained professionals I met. They radiated pride in their work coupled with an intense sense of fellowship which made me feel welcome and respected – even though I was a rookie. For this I am very grateful.

I learned the value of music therapy first-hand when I had a brain tumor diagnosed several years ago. Fortunately it was not a cancer, piano keyboardbut my recovery from major cranial surgery was slow and difficult. I was given physical/occupational and speech therapy. The music therapist working with me on the burn unit knew I played piano by ear and she suggested I work out on the piano as part of my therapy. At first everything seemed strange and “nothing” worked. Molly wouldn’t let me quit. I wanted to – it was frustrating! Slowly I began the feel at home at the keyboard and all my other therapies started to become more effective. I could “think” better.

Music therapy forced my brain to respond to the complex patterns of pitch, tempo and melody, and forced me to integrate motor function with the psycho-acoustic properties of what I was trying to express. I promptly regained my surgical skills at my pre-operative level and returned to practice on the burn unit. This response is known as neuro-plasticity; the unique ability of the brain to bypass injured areas and to re-teach the damaged brain how to regain more normal function.

I believe music therapists play an important, but often overlooked, role in helping patients cope with the effects of illness, pain, loneliness and fearful apprehension about the future of their health. Unfortunately all too often, music therapy is not reimbursed by insurance companies and many hospitals, therefore, do not use this modality of patient care. Other traditional forms of therapy, i.e. physical/occupational/speech etc., have demonstrated they are a cost effective addition to patient recovery. Insurance companies are therefore willing to compensate hospitals for these services and they generate income for the medical facility.

Music therapy professionals MUST produce evidence that their services provide a cost effective addition to other forms of care. THAT MEANS GOOD SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH must be carried out to demonstrate what we all believe. It is not enough to show a reduction in pain and anxiety with music therapy. Research must show a reduction in length of stay or improved patient outcomes for patients such as those sustaining head trauma/post traumatic stress disorder etc. Only then will insurance companies agree to reimburse hospitals/nursing homes for music therapy services; and more medical facilities will be able to incorporate music therapy as a standard of care. Then patients will receive the services we all know will benefit them. May God Speed your efforts on behalf of the patients you serve.

 

The Knot at the End of the Rope

Submitted by Florence Cohen

 end of the rope

My father lived life with strength and determination.  As complications associated with diabetes diminished his physical capabilities, his indomitable will to combat the disease fervently hammered away.  A WW II Navy Seal, Joe Altman lived by a simple rule; when you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.

When dementia struck hard and violently broke through Dad’s spirit, music therapist Alessandro Ricciarelli entered his life.  Armed with six strings attached to a wooden guitar, Alessandro surpassed the capabilities of the most sophisticated medical technology.

Each time Alessandro walked through the door, an invisible wall formed around them, creating a comfortable space in which a trusting bond of friendship would quickly form.  Alessandro brought with him happiness, encouragement, added a sense of meaning and purpose to Dad’s life, and, in doing so, resuscitated his spirit.  In a most gentle way, Alessandro treated Joe with the utmost dignity and respect.

Alessandro’s dedication was not limited to actual hospital visits; he took personal time to learn songs that were relevant to Dad and made recordings of their sessions together to be enjoyed at any given time.  Alessandro appreciated the power of positive thoughts, and with his kind words, a smile, compassion, and a true desire to make Dad happy, he encouraged Dad’s participation, leaving us with cherished memories of my father having one last chance to express himself through music, smiling and enjoying life.

In a very real sense, Alessandro was that knot at the end of the rope on to which Dad grabbed.  I am forever grateful to the Music Therapy Program at NYU Medical Center, more specifically, to Mr. Alessandro Ricciarelli.

Obviously music therapy works..at least in some cases with some people but then not all therapy works all the time in all cases.

I will be posting other blogs on the subject of mental illness and the therapies available to those afflicted.  Just know there is help available.  It may take some time to find it and it may turn out to be a combination of therapy or therapies and/or medication.  There is help but you have to find it. It is up to you to seek it out because it is very unlikely a miracle will knock on your door and say, “May I come in?  I’m the cure for all that ails you.”  If that does happen, don’t let them in.  It won’t be real.

Bob informal 3Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. JAgain, write to me and ask for “Life Pass It On.”  I will email it to you immediately.  This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound.  If you decide to use the show I will  also send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and I will send the show and book ASAP.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative  (OTI).  The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Bob Aronson de Newheart de Bob es un centro receptor de trasplante 2007, el fundador de la Iniciativa de Facebook cerca de 3.000 miembros de trasplantes de órganos y el autor de la mayoría de estos blogs de donación / trasplante.

Usted puede dejar un comentario en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico a sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si se convence a una persona para ser un donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o positivamente afectará a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas puede haber gente que conoces y amas.

Por favor, vea nuestro video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz personal sobre la donación de órganos, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso gratuito y sin permiso. JAgain, escribir a mí y pedir “Life Pass It On.” Voy a enviar por correo electrónico a usted inmediatamente Esto no es un espectáculo independiente,. Necesita un presentador, pero es producido profesionalmente y objetivamente sonido Si usted decide utilizar el archivo. demuestro que también le enviará una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un Standing” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo escribo bob@baronson.org y enviaré el programa y el libro lo antes posible.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs de otros temas de donación / trasplante. Además, nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos (OTI). Cuantos más miembros que tienen la mayor influencia en nuestra toma de decisiones.

Immunization (Vaccinations) Can Prevent the Need for a Transplant.


By Bob Aronson

We could significantly cut the demand for transplantable organs if we took better care of our bodies.  The supply/demand concept is as applicable to human organs as it is to the sale of cars.  But, with cars we can meet increased demand by building more cars.  Unfortunately we can’t build more organs and we can’t seem to persuade the 60% of the population that are not organ donors to sign up so the answer is …. reduce the demand.   That goal, though, is much easier said than done.   To accomplish it will take a major change in attitude and behavior.heart full of love

According to a health study published in The Atlantic  in January of this year the U.S. is dead last among 17 “advanced” nations {http://tinyurl.com/agglg8s}.   The results surprised even the researchers. To their alarm, they said, they found a “strikingly consistent and pervasive” pattern of poorer health at all stages of (American) life, from infancy to childhood to adolescence to young adulthood to middle and old age. Compared to people in other developed nations, Americans die far more often from injuries and homicides. We suffer more deaths from alcohol and other drugs, and endure some of the worst rates of heart disease, lung disease, obesity, and diabetes.

downward arrow

The study goes on to say, “Among the most striking of the report’s findings are that, among the countries studied, the U.S. has:

The report does reveal bright spots: Americans are more likely to survive cancer or stroke, and if we live to age 75 we’re likely to keep on living longer than others. But these advances are dwarfed by the grave shortcomings.”

Most of our ills are brought on by a lifestyle in which we eat wrong, don’t exercise,  and abuse our bodies in a million other ways, like smoking and drinking too much.   We can prevent many of the ills that kill us but as a nation we sure don’t try very hard.  One of the simple, readily available precautions is immunization.  But, because of rumors, distortions and outright lies many have become suspicious of vaccinations and not only refuse to get them but also refuse deny their children what could be life saving measures.

Here are just a couple of the myths surrounding vaccinations.

Myth 1: Better hygiene and sanitation will make diseases disappear – vaccines are not necessary. FALSE

Myth 2: Vaccines have several damaging and long-term side-effects that are yet unknown. Vaccination can even be fatal. FALSE

Myth 3: The combined vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough) and the vaccine against poliomyelitis cause sudden infant death syndrome. FALSE

We’ll address those myths and seven others shortly but first…here’s what the U.S Centers  for Disease Control (CDC) says about the issue.

centers for disease controlDiseases are becoming rare due to vaccinations.

It’s true, some diseases (like polio and diphtheria) are becoming very rare in the U.S. Of course, they are becoming rare largely because we have been vaccinating against them. But it is still reasonable to ask whether it’s really worthwhile to keep vaccinating.

It’s much like bailing out a boat with a slow leak. When we started bailing, the boat was filled with water. But we have been bailing fast and hard, and now it is almost dry. We could say, “Good. The boat is dry now, so we can throw away the bucket and relax.” But the leak hasn’t stopped. Before long we’d notice a little water seeping in, and soon it might be back up to the same level as when we started.

Keep immunizing until disease is eliminated.

Unless we can “stop the leak” (eliminate the disease), it is important to keep immunizing. Even if there are only a few cases of disease today, if we take away the protection given by vaccination, more and more people will be infected and will spread disease to others. Soon we will undo the progress we have made over the years.

serum and syinge

Japan reduced pertussis vaccinations, and an epidemic occurred.

In 1974, Japan had a successful pertussis (whooping cough) vaccination program, with nearly 80% of Japanese children vaccinated. That year only 393 cases of pertussis were reported in the entire country, and there were no deaths from pertussis. But then rumors began to spread that pertussis vaccination was no longer needed and that the vaccine was not safe, and by 1976 only 10% of infants were getting vaccinated. In 1979 Japan suffered a major pertussis epidemic, with more than 13,000 cases of whooping cough and 41 deaths. In 1981 the government began vaccinating with acellular pertussis vaccine, and the number of pertussis cases dropped again.

What if we stopped vaccinating?

So what would happen if we stopped vaccinating here? Diseases that are almost unknown would stage a comeback. Before long we would see epidemics of diseases that are nearly under control today. More children would get sick and more would die. Many if not all of these diseases can lead to organ failure or the need for tissue.  This is a partial list of diseases that can be prevented by vaccines:

Why are vaccines under fire? Some experts say it’s due to their success. “It’s the natural evolution of a vaccine program,” says Paul Offit, M.D., chief of infectious diseases and director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. “As you eliminate the diseases, people are not as compelled to get vaccines.” Adds Kathryn Edwards, M.D., spokesperson for the National Network for Immunization Information, “Many diseases are out of sight and then out of mind. So people don’t see the value of vaccines.”

Yet high immunization rates are necessary to keep diseases like measles and even polio from making a comeback.

Here are the ten myths/truths about vaccines from the World Health Organization.  This list is supported and disseminated by nearly every nation and medical association in the world including the United States http://www.who.int/features/qa/84/en/

Q: What are some of the myths – and facts – about vaccination?

A: Myth 1: Better hygiene and sanitation will make diseases disappear – vaccines are not necessary. FALSE

Fact 1: The diseases we can vaccinate against will return if we stop vaccination programmes. While better hygiene, hand washing and clean water help protect people from infectious diseases, many infections can spread regardless of how clean we are. If people are not vaccinated, diseases that have become uncommon, such as polio and measles, will quickly reappear.

Myth 2: Vaccines have several damaging and long-term side-effects that are yet unknown. Vaccination can even be fatal. FALSE

Fact 2: Vaccines are very safe. Most vaccine reactions are usually minor and temporary, such as a sore arm or mild fever. Very serious health events are extremely rare and are carefully monitored and investigated. You are far more likely to be seriously injured by a vaccine-preventable disease than by a vaccine. For example, in the case of polio, the disease can cause paralysis, measles can cause encephalitis and blindness, and some vaccine-preventable diseases can even result in death. While any serious injury or death caused by vaccines is one too many, the benefits of vaccination greatly outweigh the risk, and many, many more injuries and deaths would occur without vaccines.

Myth 3: The combined vaccine against diphtheria, tetanus and pertussis (whooping cough) and the vaccine against poliomyelitis cause sudden infant death syndrome. FALSE

Fact 3: There is no causal link between the administering of the vaccines and sudden infant death, however, these vaccines are administered at a time when babies can suffer sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).,. In other words, the SIDS deaths are co-incidental to vaccination and would have occurred even if no vaccinations had been given. It is important to remember that these four diseases are life-threatening and babies who are not vaccinated against them are at serious risk of death or serious disability.

Myth 4: Vaccine-preventable diseases are almost eradicated in my country, so there is no reason to be vaccinated. FALSE

Fact 4: Although vaccine preventable diseases have become uncommon in many countries, the infectious agents that cause them continue to circulate in some parts of the world. In a highly inter-connected world, these agents can cross geographical borders and infect anyone who is not protected. In western Europe, for example, measles outbreaks have occurred in unvaccinated populations in Austria, Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and the United Kingdom since 2005. So two key reasons to get vaccinated are to protect ourselves and to protect those around us. Successful vaccination programmes, like successful societies, depend on the cooperation of every individual to ensure the good of all. We should not rely on people around us to stop the spread of disease; we, too, must do what we can.

Myth 5: Vaccine-preventable childhood illnesses are just an unfortunate fact of life. FALSE

Fact 5: Vaccine preventable diseases do not have to be ‘facts of life’. Illnesses such as measles, mumps and rubella are serious and can lead to severe complications in both children and adults, including pneumonia, encephalitis, blindness, diarrhoea, ear infections, congenital rubella syndrome (if a woman becomes infected with rubella in early pregnancy), and death. All these diseases and suffering can be prevented with vaccines. Failure to vaccinate against these diseases leaves children unnecessarily vulnerable.

Myth 6: Giving a child more than one vaccine at a time can increase the risk of harmful side-effects, which can overload the child’s immune system. FALSE

Fact 6: Scientific evidence shows that giving several vaccines at the same time has no adverse effect on a child’s immune system. Children are exposed to several hundred foreign substances that trigger an immune response every day. The simple act of eating food introduces new antigens into the body, and numerous bacteria live in the mouth and nose. A child is exposed to far more antigens from a common cold or sore throat than they are from vaccines. Key advantages of having several vaccines at once is fewer clinic visits, which saves time and money, and children are more likely to complete the recommended vaccinations on schedule. Also, when it is possible to have a combined vaccination, e.g. for measles, mumps and rubella, that means fewer injections.

Myth 7: Influenza is just a nuisance, and the vaccine isn’t very effective. FALSE

Fact 7: Influenza is much more than a nuisance. It is a serious disease that kills 300 000-500 000 people worldwide every year. Pregnant women, small children, elderly people with poor health and anyone with a chronic condition, like asthma or heart disease, are at higher risk for severe infection and death. Vaccinating pregnant women has the added benefit of protecting their newborns (there is currently no vaccine for babies under six months). Vaccination offers immunity to the three most prevalent strains circulating in any given season. It is the best way to reduce your chances of severe flu and of spreading it to others. Avoiding the flu means avoiding extra medical care costs and lost income from missing days of work or school.

Myth 8: It is better to be immunized through disease than through vaccines. FALSE

Fact 8: Vaccines interact with the immune system to produce an immune response similar to that produced by the natural infection, but they do not cause the disease or put the immunized person at risk of its potential complications. In contrast, the price paid for getting immunity through natural infection might be mental retardation from Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), birth defects from rubella, liver cancer from hepatitis B virus, or death from measles.

Myth 9: Vaccines contain mercury which is dangerous. FALSE

Fact 9: Thiomersal is an organic, mercury-containing compound added to some vaccines as a preservative. It is the most widely-used preservative for vaccines that are provided in multi-dose vials. There is no evidence to suggest that the amount of thiomersal used in vaccines poses a health risk.

Myth 10: Vaccines cause autism FALSE

Fact 10: The 1998 study which raised concerns about a possible link between measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine and autism was later found to be seriously flawed, and the paper has been retracted by the journal that published it. Unfortunately, its publication set off a panic that led to dropping immunization rates, and subsequent outbreaks of these diseases. There is no evidence of a link between MMR vaccine and autism or autistic disorders.

The steps listed here are legitimate and proven.  Also legitimate and proven is the fact that organ and tissue transplants save lives.  A new heart saved mine.  If you  do nothing else help increase the supply of organs by being an advocate.  Talk to family and friends about organ donation.  The process is simple and fast…it only takes minutes.  You can do it by adding “Organ Donor” to your drivers license or by going to www.donatelife.net.  Sign up and then tell your family.  That’s all there is to it.  One organ/tissue donor can save or positively affect up to 60 lives.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

Mayo Clinic Preventing the Top Threats to Men’s and Women’s Health


Preventing the Top Threats to WOMEN’S Health

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/womens-health/WO00014

At first glance one might suspect that men and women are threatened by the same health problems; cancer, heart disease, stroke and many morel  And while there is some truth to that supposition there are also great differences.  The Mayo Clinic, using information from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) nicely summarized the threats and preventive steps that can and should be taken.

These tips are great reminders for everyone.

Many of the leading threats to women’s health can be prevented — if you know how. Consider this top seven list of women’s health threats, compiled from statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other leading organizations. Then get serious about reducing your risks.

No. 1: Heart disease

Heart disease isn’t just a man’s disease — it’s also a major women’s health threat. Take charge of heart health by making healthier lifestyle choices. For example:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit. It’s also important to avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Choose vegetables, fruits, whole grains, high-fiber foods and lean sources of protein, such as fish. Limit foods high in saturated fat and sodium.
  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Include physical activity in your daily routine. Choose sports or other activities you enjoy, from brisk walking to ballroom dancing.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Extra pounds increase the risk of heart disease.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. Too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure.
  • Manage stress. If you feel constantly on edge or under assault, your lifestyle habits may suffer. Take steps to reduce stress — or learn to deal with stress in healthy ways.

No. 2: Cancer

Various types of cancer are of particular concern to women, including breast cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer and colorectal cancer. To reduce the risk of cancer, consider these general tips:

  • Don’t smoke. Using any type of tobacco puts you on a collision course with cancer. Avoiding exposure to secondhand smoke counts, too.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Losing excess pounds — and keeping them off — may lower the risk of various types of cancer.
  • Get moving. In addition to helping you control your weight, physical activity on its own may lower the risk of certain types of cancer.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Although making healthy selections at the grocery store and at mealtime can’t guarantee cancer prevention, it may help reduce your risk.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. When you’re outdoors, cover up and use plenty of sunscreen.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. The risk of various types of cancer — including cancer of the breast, colon, lung, kidney and liver — increases with the amount of alcohol you drink and the length of time you’ve been drinking regularly.
  • Breast-feed, if you can. Breast-feeding may help reduce the risk of breast cancer.
  • Take early detection seriously. Consult your doctor for regular mammograms and other cancer screenings.

No. 3: Stroke

You can’t control some stroke risk factors, such as family history, age and race. But you can control other contributing factors. For example:

  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit.
  • Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet, being especially careful to limit foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation — for women, no more than one drink a day.

No. 4: Chronic lower respiratory diseases

Chronic lung conditions — which include bronchitis and emphysema — also are a concern for women. To protect your respiratory health:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit. Also avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Steer clear of pollutants. Minimize exposure to chemicals and outdoor air pollution.
  • Prevent respiratory infections. Wash your hands often and get a yearly flu vaccine. Ask your doctor whether you need a pneumonia vaccine as well.

o. 5: Alzheimer’s disease

There’s no proven way to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, but consider taking these steps:

  • Manage chronic conditions. Conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke and diabetes may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.
  • Don’t smoke. Some research suggests a link between smoking and Alzheimer’s.
  • Include physical activity in your daily routine. Any movement counts.
  • Maintain social and mental fitness. Stay socially active. Practice mental exercises. Take steps to learn new things.

No. 6: Accidents

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of fatal accidents among women. To stay safe on the road, use common sense. Wear your seat belt. Follow the speed limit. Don’t drive under the influence of alcohol or any other substances, and don’t drive while sleepy.

No. 7: Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — affects the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to heart disease, eye problems, nerve damage and other complications. To prevent type 2 diabetes, get serious about your lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.

The bottom line

It’s important to understand common women’s health risks, but don’t feel intimidated. Instead, do whatever you can to lead a healthy lifestyle — including eating a healthy diet, staying physically active, quitting smoking and getting regular checkups. Simple preventive measures can go a long way toward reducing your health risks.

Preventing the Top Threats to MEN’S health

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mens-health/MC00013

The biggest threats to men’s health can often be prevented. Here’s what you need to know to live a longer, healthier life.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Do you know the greatest threats to men’s health? The list is surprisingly short — and prevention pays off. Consider this top seven list of men’s health threats, compiled from statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other leading organizations to reflect men’s health risks in the United States. Then get serious about reducing your risks.

No. 1: Heart disease

Heart disease is a leading men’s health threat. Take charge of heart health by making healthier lifestyle choices. For example:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit. It’s also important to avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Choose vegetables, fruits, whole grains, high-fiber foods and lean sources of protein, such as fish. Limit foods high in saturated fat and sodium.
  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Include physical activity in your daily routine. Choose sports or other activities you enjoy, from basketball to brisk walking.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Extra pounds increase the risk of heart disease.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. Too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure.
  • Manage stress. If you feel constantly on edge or under assault, your lifestyle habits may suffer. Take steps to reduce stress — or learn to deal with stress in healthy ways.

No. 2: Cancer

Various types of cancer are of particular concern to men, including lung cancer, skin cancer, prostate cancer and colorectal cancer. To reduce the risk of cancer, consider these general tips:

  • Don’t smoke. Using any type of tobacco puts you on a collision course with cancer. Avoiding exposure to secondhand smoke counts, too.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Losing excess pounds — and keeping them off — may lower the risk of various types of cancer.
  • Get moving. In addition to helping you control your weight, physical activity on its own may lower the risk of certain types of cancer.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Although making healthy selections at the grocery store and at mealtime can’t guarantee cancer prevention, it may help reduce your risk.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. When you’re outdoors, cover up and use plenty of sunscreen.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. The risk of various types of cancer — including cancer of the colon, lung, kidney and liver — increases with the amount of alcohol you drink and the length of time you’ve been drinking regularly.
  • Take early detection seriously. Consult your doctor for regular cancer screenings.

No. 3: Accidents

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of fatal accidents among men. To stay safe on the road, use common sense. Wear your seat belt. Follow the speed limit. Don’t drive under the influence of alcohol or any other substances, and don’t drive while sleepy.

No. 4: Chronic lower respiratory diseases

Chronic lung conditions — which include bronchitis and emphysema — also are a concern for men. To protect your respiratory health:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit. Also avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Steer clear of pollutants. Minimize exposure to chemicals and outdoor air pollution.
  • Prevent respiratory infections. Wash your hands often and get a yearly flu vaccine. Ask your doctor whether you need a pneumonia vaccine as well.

No. 5: Stroke

You can’t control some stroke risk factors — such as family history, age and race — but you can control other contributing factors. For example:

  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit.
  • Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet, being especially careful to limit foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation.

No. 6: Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — affects the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to heart disease, eye problems, nerve damage and other complications. To prevent type 2 diabetes, get serious about your lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.

No. 7: Suicide

Suicide is another leading men’s health risk. An important risk factor for suicide among men is depression. If you have signs and symptoms of depression — such as feelings of sadness or unhappiness and loss of interest in normal activities — consult your doctor. Treatment is available. If you’re contemplating suicide, call for emergency medical help or go the nearest emergency room.

The bottom line

Understanding health risks is one thing. Taking action to reduce your risks is another. Start with healthy lifestyle choices — eating a healthy diet, staying physically active, quitting smoking, getting regular checkups and taking precautions in your daily activities. The impact may be greater than you’ll ever know.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

 Espanol

Bob Aronson Newheart de Bob es un receptor de trasplante cardiaco 2007, el fundador de Facebook, casi 2.500 Iniciativa miembro de Trasplante de Órganos y el autor de la mayoría de los blogs de donación / trasplante.

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor vea nuestro video “Gracias desde el fondo de mi corazón Donante” en http://www.organti.org Este video fue producido para promover la donación de órganos por lo que es libre y no se necesita permiso para su uso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

Hepatitis C — What You Need to Know


More people in the United States now die from hepatitis C each year than from AIDS, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 3.2 million Americans are currently infected with hepatitis C and the really bad news is that most people who have it don’t’ know it.

Let’s start with a definition.

According to the Mayo Clinic Hepatitis C is an infection caused by a virus that attacks the liver and leads to inflammation. Most people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have no symptoms. In fact, most people don’t know they have the hepatitis C infection until liver damage shows up, decades later, during routine medical tests.

Hepatitis C is one of several hepatitis viruses and is generally considered to be among the most serious of these viruses. Hepatitis C is passed through contact with contaminated blood. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hepatitis-c/DS00097

According to the U.S. Centers For Disease Control (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/c/cfaq.htm Hepatitis C is most commonly spread through the use of infected needles. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, Hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Now we know that people can become infected with the Hepatitis C virus during such activities as

  • Sharing needles, syringes, or other equipment to inject drugs
  • Needlestick injuries in health care settings
  • Being born to a mother who has Hepatitis C

Less commonly, a person can also get Hepatitis C virus infection through

  • Sharing personal care items that may have come in contact with another person’s blood, such as razors or toothbrushes
  • Having sexual contact with a person infected with the Hepatitis C virus

***Note, the Executive Director at HCVets.com, Tricia Lupole, indicates that the CDC information may be incorrect. She made this comment on our Facebook page.

“HCV by sex is a risk if both partners experience trauma and exchange blood…. the only cells found is seminal fluids are dead cells…. confirmed by many microbiologist. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15128350 There are 100s of studies that show this is the case but it is junk science that reins control of the message to control the funding. Lots of plans to make HCV the fall guy for bad behavior.“

In a second post she went on to say, “Yes, the CDC has quoted the same statement for about 15-20 years now. The study I posted is based on the CDC National Survey. Another sad point, last I checked. Even though we all know better the CDC says that there is not enough evidence to show tattoos are a risk factor.

AMA does not want to regulate tattoo parlors as medical procedures because they are responsible for guidance/ prevention. (The task has been given to OSHA).

Today Ms. Lupole issued this statement:

The Centers for Disease Control federal funding has decreased in recent decades, while there’s been increased demands for vaccination programs; resulting in limited resources for at-risk adults and other mandated priorities. The categorical nature of federal funding for HIV, STD, and viral hepatitis prevention limits the shifting of funds across program lines. In response to these funding woes, the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention’s (NCHHSTP) captured HCV disease and redesign public health services to fit HIV programs, instead of critical public health needs. It’s important to note that HCV disease was previously integrated into federal research that included its viral family called Flaviviridae, whose members are Yellow Fever and Dengue viruses and transmit disease through mosquitoes. The HCV genome is almost identical to Dengue virus.


NCHHSTP’s Federal mandate is an integration of existing programs with new programs, like Viral Hepatitis, developed to mirror HIV/AIDS management model based on specific risks and disease pathology. STD and Substance Abuse programs associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS received increased attention and funding, blurring the other components of these programs.

Needless to say, NCHHSTP has meet with resistance from advocates and congressional leaders, because of this effort by public health agencies to narrowly define HCV’s pathology.


Today, NCHHSTP spends half the federal resources acquired for HCV to vaccinate patients with both Hepatitis A & B vaccines. The majority of remaining resources are directed at drug and STD intervention and prevention. The STD division must qualify for its share of funding by defining HCV a sexually transmitted disease.


Despite scientific proof that HCV is not an STD, NCHHSTP promotes HCV as an STD based on a handful of studies that bring about scientific uncertainty, working against broader public health threats. Research excluded several methods by which the virus transmits to insure standard elements comply with CDC corporate agreement requirements. Thus… junk science.
Such actions suggests this poor public health response to the HCV Disease epidemic, may be the direct result of a system in disarray – seemingly captured by special interest with legal and political agendas that have negatively influenced the response. The integration approach has created disparities in access to health care and created “social labels” that have fostered discrimination, responsible for the reduction in quality of life.

The enduring legacy of “junk science” and indifference of governments, nonprofits, advocates, political parties or economic elites, have grave and global consequences given the propensity for viral transmission in provider settings as seen in current headlines.

FY 2012 Hepatitis C transmission and prevention: latest news. Massive increase of hepatitis C incidence in HIV-positive gay men in Switzerland 30 August 2012 …http://www.aidsmap.com/Hepatitis-C-transmission-and-prevention/cat/1628/

• FY 2008- No evidence of a HCV epidemic in HIV negative gay men
Dr Turner et al. Data from attendees at a London GUM clinic suggest that there is no increase in HCV infections amongst HIV negative gay men.

• FY 2007- Injection Behavior, Not Sexual Contact, Accounts for Couples’ HCV Risk NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Injection behavior, rather than sexual contact, accounts for the clustering of HCV virus (HCV) infection in heterosexual couples, according to a report in the June 1st issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

• FY 2004 No Evidence of Sexual Transmission of HCV among Monogamous Couples: Results of a 10-Year Prospective Study The risk of sexual transmission of HCV virus (HCV) infection was evaluated among 895 monogamous heterosexual partners of HCV chronically infected individuals in a long-term prospective study, which provided a follow-up period of 8,060 person-years.

Either way, CDC or not…. junk science remains junk science. Wish the outcry would focus on piercing jewelry or the reuse of razors and personal care items verses a national message about a method that is least as likely as not. This battle over CDC junk science, goes way back and is in memory of many who passed HCV on to family members, while sacrificing pleasures of the mind, body, and soul. As you can imagine, sexual transmission is a constant worry for some. Their partner may catch/transmit this deadly virus through sex, protection or not….. yet… turn right around and share razors and other items as such.  Especially the economically depressed populations.”

Most recently, though, we’ve identified another way people may become infected and through no fault of their own. Recently in a New Hampshire hospital an employee who was a drug addict and who also had Hepatitis C was found to be injecting himself with filled syringes meant for patients, refilling the syringes with a harmless liquid non-pain killer and then replacing the needles and syringes on the tray to be used again. Below is one of the original stories on this 2012 incident.

‘Serial infector’ accused of spreading hepatitis at NH hospital

U.S. Attorney’s Office | ASSOCIATED PRESS

CONCORD, N.H. — Authorities in at least six states are investigating whether a traveling hospital technician accused of infecting 30 people with hepatitis C in New Hampshire also exposed earlier patients to the liver-destroying disease.

David Kwiatkowski, a former technician at Exeter Hospital, was arrested Thursday morning at a Massachusetts hospital where he was receiving treatment. Once he is well enough to be released, he will be transferred to New Hampshire to face federal drug charges, said U.S. Attorney John Kacavas, who called Kwiatkowski, 33, a “serial infector” who worked in at least half a dozen states.

Authorities believe Kwiatkowski stole drugs from a hospital operating room in another state, but they declined to name any of the other states, saying only that they are not clustered in one part of the country. They would not say in what hospital Kwiatkowski was being treated at so he couldn’t be contacted for comment.

This story brought new attention to hospital policies on infection control, narcotics control and patient safety and has had ripple effects across the nation if not around the world.

So…the next question is, how serious is hepatitis C? Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer, or even death. It is the leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation in the United States. Approximately 15,000 people die every year from Hepatitis C related liver disease.

What are the long-term effects of Hepatitis C?

Of every 100 people infected with the Hepatitis C virus, about

  • 75–85 people will develop chronic Hepatitis C virus infection; of those,
    • 60–70 people will go on to develop chronic liver disease
    • 5–20 people will go on to develop cirrhosis over a period of 20–30 years
    • 1–5 people will die from cirrhosis or liver cancer

The CDC strongly suggests that all baby boomers born since 1945 should get tested for Hepatitis C. http://tinyurl.com/8tg28x6Baby boomers account for 2 million of the 3.2 million Americans infected with the blood-borne liver-destroying virus. CDC officials believe the new measure could lead 800,000 more boomers to get treatment and could save more than 120,000 lives.

“The CDC views hepatitis C as an unrecognized health crisis for the country, and we believe the time is now for a bold response,” said Dr. John W. Ward, the CDC’s hepatitis chief.

Several developments drove the CDC’s push for wider testing, he said. Recent data has shown that from 1999 and 2007, there was a 50 percent increase in the number of Americans dying from hepatitis C-related diseases. Also, two drugs hit the market last year that promise to cure many more people than was previously possible.

What are the Symptoms of Hepatitis C?

Here’s what WEBMD says. http://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/hepc-guide/hepatitis-c-symptoms

Most people who are infected with hepatitis C-even people who have been infected for a while-usually don’t have symptoms.

If symptoms do develop, they may include:

  • Fatigue.
  • Joint pain.
  • Belly pain.
  • Itchy skin.
  • Sore muscles.
  • Dark urine.
  • Jaundice, a condition in which the skin and the whites of the eyes look yellow.

A hepatitis C infection can cause damage to your liver (cirrhosis). If you develop cirrhosis, you may have:

  • Redness on the palms of your hands caused by expanded small blood vessels.
  • Clusters of blood vessels just below the skin that look like tiny red spiders and usually appear on your chest, shoulders, and face.
  • Swelling of your belly, legs, and feet.
  • Shrinking of the muscles.
  • Bleeding from enlarged veins in your digestive tract, which is called variceal bleeding.
  • Damage to your brain and nervous system, which is called encephalopathy. This damage can cause symptoms such as confusion and memory and concentration problems.

What Treatment is Available?

So if you have Hepatitis C, then what? There are a number of options and there might even be a cure before too long. Standard state of the art treatment today for Hepatitis C is with Peginterferon and Ribavirin which achieves a “sustained response” up to 54% of people, which means that the virus has been eliminated from their blood after stopping treatment. People with hepatitis C types 2 and 3 have sustained response rates of about 80%; people with type 1 have rates of up to 50%.

While hepatitis C treatment has come a long way, there are still drawbacks. For a person who’s newly diagnosed, a 54% cure rate may not sound great. After all, it means that about one out of two people won’t respond to treatment.

Also, hepatitis C treatment is less effective in some populations. For reasons that no one understands yet, African-Americans are less likely to benefit from treatment. And the treatments may not be safe for people with other medical conditions — such as kidney failure, heart disease, or pregnancy. Interferon can also be expensive; according to the American Academy of Family Physicians, it can cost $6,000 per year. http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=52451

It is important to note again, that while liver transplants can be very helpful to Hepatitis C patients, the procedure is not a cure but rather a delaying action and an effective one. There is some evidence that a transplant from a living donor to a patient who has been receiving the Interferon treatment could represent a cure. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kOElXz0vVg

A Possible Medicinal Cure

Gilead Science is performing multiple studies to test an experimental drug, but the trial that is possibly the most intriguing looks at a combination therapy that rolls two medicines into a single pill. Gilead hopes to advance tests of its lead hepatitis drug GS-7977 in a combination with another company medicine, GS-5885.

Bristol Myers Squibb had a promising drug but clinical trials resulted in some negative results so the company has sent the project back to the drawing board. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/24/business/bristol-myers-ends-work-on-hepatitis-c-drug.html?_r=2&

Finally, Gilead Sciences, mentioned earlier, has a drug that combined with another from Bristol Myers Squibb could be a cure, at least clinical trials seem to offer that indication but the two companies, according to Hepatitis C activist Margaret Dudley can’t seem to cooperate. She is circulating a petition to get the “cure” on the market. http://hepc-cured.com/

October is National Liver Awareness month. We hope you have found these blogs helpful and offer these links for further information.

http://www.liverfoundation.org/

http://www.nlfindia.com/index.asp

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/liver-problems/DS01133

http://tinyurl.com/92bjlup U.S. Government Link

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

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