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What You Need To Know About Your Liver and The Transplant Process


By Bob Aronson

cartoonThe liver is an incredibly important organ and the only one in the human body that can regenerate itself.  It is second only in size to the skin (yes the skin is an organ) and has been described as boomerang shaped.  Virtually every nutrient we consume passes through the liver so it can be processed and turned into a different biochemical form for use by other organs.

Located just below the rib cage in the upper right side of your abdomen the liver has three main functions.  It helps in digestion makes proteins and helps eliminate toxic substances.the liver

The liver is the only organ in the body that can easily replace damaged cells, but if enough cells are lost, the liver may not be able to meet the needs of the body.

The liver is like a very complex factory.  Included in its many functions are:          http://www.medicinenet.com/liver_anatomy_and_function/images-quizzes/index.htm

  • Production of bile that is required in the digestion of food, in particular fats;
  • Storing of the extra glucose or sugar as glycogen, and then converting it back into glucose when the body needs it for energy;
  • Production of blood clotting factors;
  • Production of amino acids (the building blocks for making proteins), including those used to help fight infection;
  • The processing and storage of iron necessary for red blood cell production;
  • Manufacture of cholesterol and other chemicals required for fat transport;
  • Conversion of waste products of body metabolism into urea that is excreted in the urine; and
  • Metabolizing medications into their active ingredient in the body.
  • Cirrhosis is a term that describes permanent scarring of the liver. In cirrhosis, the normal liver cells are replaced by scar tissue that cannot perform any liver function.
  • Acute liver failure may or may not be reversible, meaning that on occasion, there is a treatable cause and the liver may be able to recover and resume its normal functions.

The Liver can be affected by any one of a number of diseases.  Click on the item of interest in the list below for a complete explanation.

The Liver Disease Information Center provides information on a variety of topics related to liver health and liver diseases

liver disease. http://www.liverfoundation.org/abouttheliver/info/

How does alcohol affect the liver? (From the American Liver Foundation)  http://www.liverfoundation.org/abouttheliver/info/alcohol/

Alcohol can damage or destroy liver cells.

liver disease stagesThe liver breaks down alcohol so it can be removed from your body. Your liver can become injured or seriously damaged if you drink more alcohol than it can process.

What are the different types of alcohol-related liver disease?

There are three main types of alcohol-related liver disease: alcoholic fatty liver disease, alcoholic hepatitis, and alcoholic cirrhosis.

Alcoholic fatty liver disease
Alcoholic fatty liver disease results from the deposition of fat in liver cells. It is the earliest stage of alcohol-related liver disease. There are usually no symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they may include fatigue, weakness, and discomfort localized to the right upper abdomen. Liver enzymes may be elevated, however tests of liver function are often normal. Many heavy drinkers have fatty liver disease. Alcoholic fatty liver disease may be reversible with abstinence of alcohol.

Alcoholic hepatitis
Alcoholic hepatitis is characterized by fat deposition in liver cells, inflammation and mild scarring of the liver. Symptoms may include loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fever and jaundice. Liver enzymes are elevated and tests of liver function may be abnormal. Up to 35 percent of heavy drinkers develop alcoholic hepatitis and of these 55% already have cirrhosis.

Alcoholic hepatitis can be mild or severe. Mild alcoholic hepatitis may be reversed with abstinence. Severe alcoholic hepatitis may occur suddenly and lead to serious complications including liver failure and death.

Alcoholic cirrhosis
Alcoholic cirrhosis, the most advanced type of alcohol induced liver injury is characterized by severe scarring and disruption of the normal structure of the liver — hard scar tissue replaces soft healthy tissue. Between 10 and 20 percent of heavy drinkers develop cirrhosis. Symptoms of cirrhosis may be similar to those of severe alcoholic hepatitis. Cirrhosis is the most advanced type of alcohol-related liver disease and is not reversed with abstinence. However, abstinence may improve the symptoms and signs of liver disease and prevent further damage

The Liver Transplant

Liver transplants are performed only for patients with end-stage liver disease for whom standard medical and surgical therapies have failed. Conditions that can lead to liver transplantation include: transplant(http://www.barnesjewish.org/conditions-leading-to-liver-transplant)

Liver transplants are the second most common transplants after kidneys.  They require that the blood type and body size of the donor match the person receiving the new organ. There are more  6,000 liver transplants are performed each year in the United States. The surgery usually takes between four and twelve hours and most patients can expect a hospital stay of up to three weeks following surgery. . .

Essential Information For The Transplant Patient

Most transplant centers function in pretty much the same manner, but Johns Hopkins Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland offers one of the best summaries of what the transplant patient can expect.  http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/healthlibrary/test_procedures/gastroenterology/liver_transplantation_procedure_92,P07698/

Risks of the procedure

As with any surgery, complications can occur. Some complications from liver transplantation may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Bleeding
  • Infection
  • Blockage of the blood vessels to the new liver
  • Leakage of bile or blockage of bile ducts
  • Initial lack of function of new liver

The new liver may not function for a brief time after the transplant. The new liver may also be rejected. Rejection is a normal reaction of the body to a foreign object or tissue. When a new liver is transplanted into a recipient’s body, the immune system reacts to what it perceives as a threat and attacks the new organ, not realizing that the transplanted liver is beneficial. To allow the organ to survive in a new body, medications must be taken to trick the immune system into accepting the transplant and not attacking it as a foreign object.

Contraindications for liver transplantation include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Current or recurring infection that cannot be treated effectively
  • Metastatic cancer. This is cancer that has spread from its primary location to one or more additional locations in the body.
  • Severe cardiac or other medical problems preventing the ability to tolerate the surgical procedure
  • Serious conditions other than liver disease that would not improve after transplantation
  • Noncompliance with treatment regimen
  • Alcohol consumption

There may be other risks depending on your specific medical condition. Be sure to discuss any concerns with your doctor prior to the procedure.

Before the procedure

In order to receive a liver from an organ donor who has died (cadaver), a recipient must be placed on a waiting list of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Extensive testing must be done before an individual can be placed on the transplant list.

Because of the wide range of information necessary to determine eligibility for transplant, the evaluation process is carried out by a transplant team. The team includes a transplant surgeon, a transplant hepatologist (doctor specializing in the treatment of the liver), one or more transplant nurses, a social worker, and a psychiatrist or psychologist. Additional team members may include a dietitian, a chaplain, and/or an anesthesiologist.

Components of the transplant evaluation process include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Psychological and social evaluation. Psychological and social issues involved in organ transplantation, such as stress, financial issues, and support by family and/or significant others are assessed. These issues can significantly impact the outcome of a transplant.
  • Blood tests. Blood tests are performed to help determine a good donor match, to assess your priority on the donor list, and to help improve the chances that the donor organ will not be rejected.
  • Diagnostic tests. Diagnostic tests may be performed to assess your liver as well as your overall health status. These tests may include X-rays, ultrasound procedures, liver biopsy, and dental examinations. Women may receive a Pap test, gynecology evaluation, and a mammogram.

The transplant team will consider all information from interviews, your medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests in determining your eligibility for liver transplantation.

Once you have been accepted as a transplant candidate, you will be placed on the UNOS list. Candidates in most urgent need of a transplant are given highest priority when a donor liver becomes available based on UNOS guidelines. When a donor organ becomes available, you will be notified and told to come to the hospital immediately.

If you are to receive a section of liver from a living family member (living-related transplant), the transplant may be performed at a planned time. The potential donor must have a compatible blood type and be in good health. A psychological test will be conducted to ensure the donor is comfortable with the decision.

The following steps will precede the transplant:

  • Your doctor will explain the procedure to you and offer you the opportunity to ask any questions about the procedure.
  • You will be asked to sign a consent form that gives your permission to do the surgery. Read the form carefully and ask questions if something is not clear.
  • For a planned living transplant, you should fast for eight hours before the operation, generally after midnight. In the case of a cadaver organ transplant, you should begin to fast once you are notified that a liver has become available.
  • You may receive a sedative prior to the procedure to help you relax.
  • Based on your medical condition, your doctor may request other specific preparation.

During the procedure

Liver transplantation requires a stay in a hospital. Procedures may vary depending on your condition and your doctor’s practices.

Generally, a liver transplant follows this process:

  • You will be asked to remove your clothing and given a gown to wear.
  • An intravenous (IV) line will be started in your arm or hand. Additional catheters will be inserted in your neck and wrist to monitor the status of your heart and blood pressure, as well as for obtaining blood samples. Alternate sites for the additional catheters include the subclavian (under the collarbone) area and the groin.
  • You will be positioned on the operating table, lying on your back.
  • If there is excessive hair at the surgical site, it may be clipped off.
  • A catheter will be inserted into your bladder to drain urine.
  • After you are sedated, the anesthesiologist will insert a tube into your lungs so that your breathing can be controlled with a ventilator. The anesthesiologist will continuously monitor your heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, and blood oxygen level during the surgery.
  • The skin over the surgical site will be cleansed with an antiseptic solution.
  • The doctor will make a slanting incision just under the ribs on both sides of the abdomen. The incision will extend straight up for a short distance over the breast bone.
  • The doctor will carefully separate the diseased liver from the surrounding organs and structures.
  • The attached arteries and veins will be clamped to stop blood flow into the diseased liver.
  • Depending on several factors, including the type of transplant being performed (whole liver versus a portion of liver), different surgical techniques may be used to remove the diseased liver and implant the donor liver or portion of the liver.
  • The diseased liver will be removed after it has been cut off from the blood vessels.
  • The doctor will visually inspect the donor liver or portion of liver prior to implanting it.
  • The donor liver will be attached to the blood vessels. Blood flow to the new liver will be established and then checked for bleeding at the suture lines.
  • The new liver will be connected to the bile ducts.
  • The incision will be closed with stitches or surgical staples.
  • A drain may be placed in the incision site to reduce swelling.
  • A sterile bandage or dressing will be applied.

After the procedure In the hospital

After the surgery you may be taken to the recovery room before being taken to the intensive care unit (ICU) to be closely monitored for several days. Alternately, you may be taken directly to the ICU from the operating room. You will be connected to monitors that will constantly display your EKG tracing, blood pressure, other pressure readings, breathing rate, and your oxygen level. Liver transplant surgery requires an in-hospital stay of seven to 14 days, or longer.recovery

You will most likely have a tube in your throat so that your breathing can be assisted with a ventilator until you are stable enough to breathe on your own. The breathing tube may remain in place for a few hours up to several days, depending on your situation.

You may have a thin plastic tube inserted through your nose into your stomach to remove air that you swallow. The tube will be removed when your bowels resume normal function. You will not be able to eat or drink until the tube is removed.

Blood samples will be taken frequently to monitor the status of the new liver, as well as other body functions, such as the kidneys, lungs, and blood system.

You may be on special IV drips to help your blood pressure and your heart and to control any problems with bleeding. As your condition stabilizes, these drips will be gradually weaned down and turned off as tolerated.

Once the breathing and stomach tubes have been removed and your condition has stabilized, you may start liquids to drink. Your diet may be gradually advanced to more solid foods as tolerated.

Your immunosuppression (antirejection) medications will be closely monitored to make sure you are receiving the optimum dose and the best combination of medications.

When your doctor feels you are ready, you will be moved from the ICU to a room on a regular nursing unit or transplant unit. Your recovery will continue to progress here. Your activity will be gradually increased as you get out of bed and walk around for longer periods of time. Your diet will be advanced to solid foods as tolerated.

Nurses, pharmacists, dietitians, physical therapists, and other members of the transplant team will teach you how to take care of yourself once you are discharged from the hospital.

At home

Once you are home, it will be important to keep the surgical area clean and dry. Your doctor will give you specific bathing instructions. The stitches or surgical staples will be removed during a follow-up office visit, if they were not removed before leaving the hospital.

You should not drive until your doctor tells you to. Other activity restrictions may apply.

Notify your doctor to report any of the following:

  • This may be a sign of rejection or infection.
  • Redness, swelling, or bleeding or other drainage from the incision site
  • Increase in pain around the incision site. This may be a sign of infection or rejection.
  • Vomiting and/or diarrhea

Your doctor may give you additional or alternate instructions after the procedure, depending on your particular situation.

What is done to prevent rejection?

To allow the transplanted liver to survive in a new body, you will be given medications for the rest of your rejectionlife to fight rejection. Each person may react differently to medications, and each transplant team has preferences for different medications.

New antirejection medications are continually being developed and approved. Doctors tailor medication regimes to meet the needs of each individual patient.

Usually several antirejection medications are given initially. The doses of these medications may change frequently, depending on your response. Because antirejection medications affect the immune system, people who receive a transplant will be at higher risk for infections. A balance must be maintained between preventing rejection and making you very susceptible to infection.

Some of the infections you will be especially susceptible to include oral yeast infection (thrush), herpes, and respiratory viruses. You should avoid contact with crowds and anyone who has an infection for the first few months after your surgery.

The following are the most common symptoms of rejection. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Fever
  • A yellowing of the skin and eyes due to bile pigments in the blood.
  • Dark urine
  • Itching
  • Abdominal swelling or tenderness
  • Fatigue or irritability
  • Headache
  • Nausea

The symptoms of rejection may resemble other medical conditions or problems. Consult your transplant teaoncerns you have. Frequent visits to and contact with the transplant team are essential.

Organ transplants are expensive and the cost goes well beyond the surgery itself.  If you are told you need a transplant and are sent to a transplant center for evaluation you can bet one of the first questions you will be asked is, “Do you have the financial resources to pay for your transplant?”

According to the National Foundation for Transplants http://www.transplants.org/faq/how-much-does-transplant-cost the average cost of a liver transplant and first year expenses in the United States is $575,000.

The Mayo Clinic developed this helpful list of questions that will help you develop the answer to that question. http://www.mayoclinic.org/departments-centers/transplant-center/liver-transplant/choosing-mayo-clinic/costs-insurance-information

Insurance information

Before your transplant, it’s important that you work closely with your insurance company to understand your benefit plan. You’ll be responsible for any of your transplant and medical care costs not covered by your insurance company.costs

You may want to ask your insurance company several questions regarding your transplant expenses, including:

  • What is the specific coverage of my plan? What are my deductibles, coinsurance, copayments, lifetime maximum amount and annual maximum amounts for both medical care and transplant services?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period clause? If so, what is the time frame? Can this be waived?
  • Does my plan include pharmacy coverage? If so, will my plan cover my current medications and immunosuppressant medications?
  • Does my plan require any special approvals for evaluation or transplant? How long does the approval process take once submitted to insurance?
  • Does my plan cover my transportation and lodging expenses during my transplant care?
  • Does my current insurance require enrollment in Medicare when eligible?
  • Does my insurance follow Medicare Coordination of Benefits guidelines?
  • How will my current coverage change after enrolling in Medicare? Will my plan become a supplemental or secondary plan?

If your plan is a Medicare supplement, ask questions including:

  • Does my plan follow Medicare guidelines?
  • Does my plan cover Medicare Part A and B deductible and coinsurance?
  • Does my plan have a pre-existing or waiting period? If so, what is the time frame?
  • Does my plan offer an option for Medicare Part D coverage?

Other expenses

Please plan for other expenses that may occur related to your transplant, which may include follow-up medical appointments, long-term medications, caregiver expenses, travel, parking, lodging and other expenses.

Financial Aid

If you need an organ transplant, but don’t have the financial resources to pay for it you should first work with the transplant center social worker to see what is available. There are a number of resources for which you may qualify.  Just click on this link for the complete list and explanation of services.  http://www.transplantliving.org/before-the-transplant/financing-a-transplant/directory/

bob 2Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,200 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes.

From Farm to Fork — How Safe Is Our Food?


Food safety cartoonThe very food that we need to help us grow and live, could also cause us to become ill and die.   Food — we cannot live without it, but it can pose great danger.   Let’s look at cold hard reality.  Our food supply, our food storage systems and our cooking and eating habits may be responsible for a great deal of misery.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that contaminated food sickens approximately 76 million Americans, leading to some 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.

Food safety is particularly important to anyone with a take proactive measurescompromised immune system because we just don’t have the ability to fight infections whether they are bacterial or viral.  Certainly people who have had organ transplants fall into that category.  Transplant recipients must be especially careful.

As I started to research this posting the first question that popped into my mind was, “Which foods are most likely to make me sick. I found this list of the top ten from the Center for Science in the Public Interest as reprinted in the Fiscal Times

1) Leafy Greensleafy greens

Lettuce and spinach may be on the top of most nutritionists’ lists, but they’re also among the foods most linked to outbreaks of illness. The contaminations often starts at the farm through contact with wild animals or manure.

*Source: The Center for Science in the Public Interest

– See more at: http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Media/Slideshow/2013/12/02/10-Foods-Most-Likely-Make-You-Sick#sthash.CTYjKR8I.dpuf

2) Eggs

The risk for salmonella makes eggs the second-most popular source of food-based illnesses. Consumers can protect themselves by fully cooking all eggs and eating or storing eggs promptly after cooking.

3) Tuna

tunaIf not properly stored immediately after being caught, tuna begins to decay and can release scrombotoxin, which can cause food poisoning.

4) Oysters

Raw or undercooked oysters can breed vibrio bacteria, which can cause mild food poisoning in healthy individuals and life-threatening illness among those with a weakened immune system. Best practices in preparing oysters is to discard any open shells before cooking, and any shells that didn’t open while cooking.

5) Potatoes

Baked potatoes become breeding grounds for botulism when they’re wrapped in foil and left out to cool too long. Unwrap potatoes after baking them, and store them in a cool, dark place before cooking.

6) Cheesecheese

Sticking with pasteurized cheese greatly reduces the risk of bacteria, but some soft cheeses—even those made with pasteurized cheese—are vulnerable to contamination during the cheese-making process.

7) Ice Cream

Everyone may scream for this summer treat, but when it’s made with undercooked eggs the cold stuff can become dangerous. Even store-bought ice cream can breed bacteria when it’s put back in the freezer after unfreezing.

8) Tomatoes

Salmonella can contaminate tomatoes on the farm via the roots, flowers or cracks in the skin. If an infected tomato is eaten raw, it has a high risk of infecting the person who consumers it.

9) Sprouts

utsThe humid settings ideal for cultivating sprouts are also model conditions for salmonella, listeria and E. Coli. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those with a weakened immune systems should avoid eating sprouts all together.

10) Berries

Strawberries, blackberries, and blueberries have been linked to a number of food-borne illness outbreaks in recent year. Last summer, a hepatitis A outbreak the sickened 150 people was traced back to frozen organic berries.

The Importance of Temperature

thermometerInadequate food temperature control is the most common factor contributing to food borne illness. Disease causing bacteria grow particularly well in foods high in protein such as meats, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, cooked vegetables such as beans, and cooked cereal grains such as rice. Because of the high potential for rapid bacterial growth in these foods they are known as “potentially hazardous foods.”

Temperature Danger Zone

The temperature range at which bacteria grow best in potentially hazardous foods is between 41F. and 140F. The goal of all temperature controls is to either keep foods entirely out of this “danger zone” or to pass foods through this “danger zone” as quickly as possible.

So now you know which foods may pose the greatest threat to your health, but there are other factors that should concern us as well.  For example:

America’s food safety system has not been fundamentally modernized in more than 100 years.

Twenty states and D.C. did not meet or exceed the national average rate for being able to identify the pathogens responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks in their states.

Ensuring the public can quickly and safely receive medications during a major health emergency is one of the most serious challenges facing public health officials.  Sixteen states have purchased less than half of their share of federally-subsidized antivirals to use during a pandemic flu outbreak.

The main culprits are familiar. They include:

  • lmonellaSalmonella, bacteria that cause over 1.5 million illnesses per year. These commonly reside in uncooked poultry and eggs. Recent outbreaks have been linked to peanut butter, alfalfa sprouts and tomatoes.
  • E. coli 0157:H7, a dangerous bacterial strain that can cause kidney failure, turns up disproportionately in ground beef. Lately it’s been linked to spinach and pre-made cookie dough. (For a complete list, see the full report, which details also the geographical distribution of food-borne illnesses in the U.S.) You can read and learn more here http://tinyurl.com/k64har2

There are three types of hazards in a food manufacturing process: physical, chemical and biological. Foreign objects are the most obvious evidence of a contaminated product and are therefore most likely to be reported by production or by consumer complaints. However, they are also less likely than chemical or biological contaminants to affect large numbers of people.

Attributing illness to foods is a challenge for several reasons.  There are thousands of different foods, and we eat many varieties prepared in different ways, even in a single meal.  For the vast majority of foodborne illnesses, we simply don’t know which food is responsible for an illness.

One way to develop a fairly accurate estimate is to use  data collected during investigations of a food illness outbreak.   These investigations provide direct links between foodborne illnesses and which foods are responsible for them.

According to the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases, there are more than 250 known foodborne diseases. They can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Natural and manufactured chemicals in food products also can make people sick. Some diseases are caused by toxins or poisons from the disease-causing microbe or germ, others are caused by your body’s reaction to the germ.

foodborne diseaseTypes of Foodborne Diseases as supplied by the National Institutes of Health (click on each one for details including symptoms and treatment or click this link for the NIH website http://www.niaid.nih.gov/)

Botulism, Campylobacteriosis, E. coli, Hepatitis A, Norovirus Infection, Salmonellosis, Shigellosis, Prevention

So how do you avoid these unpronounceable diseases?  Besides the information provided on the links to each disease, you might also want to make note of the following helpful suggestions

No matter how busy you are, from top to bottom, a clean kitchen is a main line of defense for your family and the prevention of food poisoning.  You simply must eliminate the breeding grounds for dangerous bacteria.

  •  Wash your hands often – front and back, between fingers, under fingernails – in warm soapy water for at least 20 seconds (or two choruses of “Happy Birthday”) before and after every step in preparing or eating foods. That includes your kitchen helpers, such as children.
  • Clean all work surfaces often to remove food particles and spills. Use hot, soapy water. Keep nonfood items – mail, newspapers, purses – off counters and away from food and utensils. Wash the counter carefully before and after food preparation.
  • wash dishesWash dishes and cookware in the dishwasher or in hot, soapy water, and always rinse them well. Remember that chipped plates and china can collect bacteria.
  • Change towels and dishcloths often and wash them in the hot cycle of your washing machine. Allow them to dry out between each use. If they are damp, they’re the perfect breeding ground for bacteria.
  • Throw out dirty sponges or sterilize them by rinsing the sponge and microwaving it for about two minutes while still wet. Be careful, the sponge will be hot.

Pay close attention to the refrigerator and the freezer – shelves, sides and door – where foods are stored. Pack perishables in coolers while you clean or defrost your refrigerator or freezer.

Splatters inside your microwave can also collect bacteria, so keep it clean.

Physical Hazards

We’ve talked a lot about diseases and illnesses but our health is also subject to physical hazards.  You can view a University of Nebraska Slide show on the subject here: http://tinyurl.com/k6k4qow

What is a physical hazard?

We’ve all heard the stories about Rocks, insects and other things showing up in soda and beer cans.  While those instances are rare, they still happen.  Any extraneous object or foreign matter in food which may cause illness or injury to a person consuming the product is a physical hazard. These objects include bone or bone chips, metal flakes or fragments, injection needles, BB’s or shotgun pellets, pieces of product packaging, stones, glass or wood fragments, insects, personal items, or any other foreign matter not normally found in food.

The 8 most common food categories implicated in reported foreign object complaints are bakery products, soft drinks, vegetables, infant’s foods, fruits, cereals, fishery products and chocolate and cocoa products.  Below you will find a list of hazards, their effect and the treatment.  You can find more detailed information by clicking on this link http://tinyurl.com/mbktawq

These materials have been found in food and can cause severe trauma, bleeding, cuts and even death.  In many cases surgery is required to correct the damage caused by; Glass, wood, stones, bullets, BBs, needles, jewelry, metal, .Insects and other contaminated material, building materials, bone, plastic and personal effects

As with any topic it is sometimes difficult to separate fact from fiction.  There are so many rumors, old Wives tales and myths people often think they are doing the right thing when in fact they may be making matters worse.  We can’t dispel all the rumors, but we can address a few.

Food Safety Myths Exposed

http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/basics/myths/

We all do our best to serve our families food that’s safe and healthy, but some common myths about food safety might surprise you.

MYTH: Food poisoning isn’t that big of a deal. I just have to tough it out for a day or two and then it’s over.

FACT: Many people don’t know it, but some foodborne illnesses can actually lead to long-term health conditions, and 5,000 insectAmericans a year die from foodborne illness. Get the FACTs on long-term effects of food poisoning.

MYTH: It’s OK to thaw meat on the counter. Since it starts out frozen, bacteria isn’t really a problem.

FACT: Actually, bacteria grow surprisingly rapidly at room temperatures, so the counter is never a place you should thaw foods. Instead, thaw foods the right way.

MYTH When cleaning my kitchen, the more bleach I use, the better. More bleach kills more bacteria, so it’s safer for my family.

FACT: There is actually no advantage to using more bleach than needed. To clean kitchen surfaces effectively, use just one teaspoon of liquid, unscented bleach to one quart of water.

MYTH I don’t need to wash fruits or vegetables if I’m going to peel them.

FACT: Because it’s easy to transfer bacteria from the peel or rind you’re cutting to the inside of your fruits and veggies, it’simportant to wash all produce, even if you plan to peel it.

poultryMYTH: To get rid of any bacteria on my meat, poultry, or seafood, I should rinse off the juices with water first.

FACT: Actually, rinsing meat, poultry, or seafood with water can increase your chance of food poisoning by splashing juices (and any bacteria they might contain) onto your sink and counters. The best way to cook meat, poultry, or seafood safely is tomake sure you cook it to the right temperature.

MYTH: The only reason to let food sit after it’s been microwaved is to make sure you don’t burn yourself on food that’s too hot.

FACT: In FACT, letting microwaved food sit for a few minutes (“standing time”) helps your food cook more completely by allowing colder areas of food time to absorb heat from hotter areas of food.

MYTH: Leftovers are safe to eat until they smell bad.

FACT: The kinds of bacteria that cause food poisoning do not affect the look, smell, or taste of food. To be safe, use our Safe Storage Times chart to make sure you know the right time to throw food out.

MYTH: Once food has been cooked, all the bacteria have been killed, so I don’t need to worry once it’s “done.”

FACT: Actually, the possibility of bacterial growth actually increases after cooking, because the drop in temperature allows bacteria to thrive. This is why keeping cooked food warmed to the right temperature is critical for food safety.

MYTH: Marinades are acidic, which kills bacteria—so it’s OK to marinate foods on the counter.

FACT: Even in the presence of acidic marinade, bacteria can grow very rapidly at room temperatures. To marinate foods safely, it’s important to marinate them in the refrigerator.

MYTH: If I really want my produce to be safe, I should wash fruits and veggies with soap or detergent before I use them.

FACT: In FACT, it’s best not to use soaps or detergents on produce, since these products can linger on foods and are not safe for consumption. Using clean running water is actually the

cookie doughMYTH: Only kids eat raw cookie dough and cake batter. If we just keep kids away from the raw products when adults are baking, there won’t be a problem!

FACT: Just a lick can make you sick!
No one of any age should eat raw cookie dough or cake batter because it could contain germs that cause illness. Whether it’s pre-packaged or homemade, the heat from baking is required to kill germs that might be in the raw ingredients. The finished, baked, product is far safer – and tastes even better! So don’t do it! And remember, kids who eat raw cookie dough and cake batter are at greater risk of getting food poisoning than most adults are.

MYTH: When kids cook it is usually “heat and eat” snacks and foods in the microwave. They don’t have to worry about food safety – the microwaves kill the germs!

FACT: Microwaves aren’t magic!
It’s the heat the microwaves generate that kills the germs! Food cooked in a microwave needs to be heated to a safe internal temperature. Microwaves often heat food unevenly, leaving cold spots in food where germs can survive. Kids can use microwaves properly by carefully following package instructions. Even simple “heat and eat” snacks come with instructions that need to be followed to ensure a safe product. Use a food thermometer if the instructions tell you to!

MYTH: When kids wash their hands, just putting their hands under running water is enough to get the germs off.

How to wash handsFACT: Rubbing hands with water and soap is the best way to go!
Water is just part of what you need for clean hands! Washing hands properly is a great way to reduce the risk of food poisoning. Here’s how: Wet your hands with clean, running water and apply soap. Rub them together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of hands, between fingers, and under nails. Continue rubbing for at least 20 seconds. Sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice to time yourself! Rinse hands well under running water. Dry your hands using a clean towel, paper towel, or an air dryer.

MYTH: My kids only eat pre-packaged fruits and veggies for snacks because those snacks don’t need to be washed before they eat them.

FACT: Read your way to food safety!
Giving your kids healthy snacks is a big plus for them! But just because produce is wrapped, it doesn’t always mean it’s ready to eat as is. Read the label of your product to make sure it is says: “ready-to-eat,” “washed,” or “triple washed.” If it does, you’re good to go! If it doesn’t, wash your hands and then rinse the fruits or vegetables under running tap water. Scrub firm items, such as melons and cucumbers, with a clean produce brush. Dry with a clean cloth towel or paper towel to further reduce germs that may be present.

While federal, state and local agencies provide a valuable service with their contributions to our food safety, the primary responsibility is yours.  Too many of us become too careless with our food preparation and storage procedures and each of us needs to pay far more attention to the cleanliness of the areas in which we prepare food and to the cleanliness of the food itself.

-0-

bob minus Jay full shotBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes.

A Funny Bone Transplant


We are nearing the holidays.  Thanksgiving is comming up, followed by Christmas, Las Posadas, Hanukkah , Boxing day, Kwanzaa and the new year, 2013.

It is a time when we should be winding down a littl.  A time when we shrug off the trials and tribulations of the past months and find reason to refelect on the good things in life, those special events and words that make you smile.

In a complete break with the long standing Bob’s Newheart tradition of providing only serious information, I thought that perhaps we could all use a little humor in our lives.  I’m hoping that this list of questions will bring a smile to your face and lighten your step just a bit and if you laugh out loud, that’s even better.  Feel free to share this with anyone on your holiday smile list.

This list of questions was sent to me by a friend.  If I knew who the author was I would certainly give him or her credit.

 

QUESTIONS THAT HAUNT ME!

Can you cry under water?
How important does a person have to be before they are considered assassinated instead of just murdered?
Why do you have to ‘put your two cents in’… but it’s only a ‘penny for your thoughts’? Where’s that extra penny going?
Once you’re in heaven, do you get stuck wearing the clothes you were buried in for eternity?
Why does a round pizza come in a square box?
What disease did cured ham actually have?
How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?
Why is it that people say they ‘slept like a baby’ when babies wake up like every two hours?
If a deaf person has to go to court, is it still called a hearing?
Why are you IN a movie, but you’re ON TV?
Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money in binoculars to look at things on the ground?
Why do doctors leave the room while you change?   They’re going to see you naked anyway…
Why is ‘bra’ singular and ‘panties’ plural?
Why do toasters always have a setting that burns the toast to a horrible crisp, which no one would eat?
If Jimmy cracks corn and no one cares, why is there a stupid song about him?
If the professor on Gilligan’s Island can make a radio out of a coconut, why can’t he fix a hole in a boat?
Why does Goofy stand erect while Pluto remains on all fours?   They’re both dogs!
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME crap, why didn’t he just buy dinner?
If corn oil is made from corn, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, what is baby oil made from?
If electricity comes from electrons, does morality come from morons?
Do the Alphabet song and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star have the same tune?
Why did you just try singing the two songs above?
Why do they call it an asteroid when it’s outside the hemisphere, but call it a hemorrhoid when it’s in your butt?
Did you ever notice that when you blow in a dog’s face, he gets mad at you,   but when you take him for a car ride, he sticks his head out the window?
Why, Why, Why
Why do we press harder on a remote control when we know the batteries are getting dead?
Why do banks charge a fee on ‘insufficient funds’ when they know there is not enough money?
Why does someone believe you when you say there are four billion stars, but check when you say the paint is wet?
Why do they use sterilized needles for death by lethal injection?
Why doesn’t Tarzan have a beard?
Why does Superman stop bullets with his chest, but ducks when you throw a revolver at him?
Why do Kamikaze pilots wear helmets?
Whose idea was it to put an ‘S’ in the word ‘lisp’?
If people evolved from apes, why are there still apes?
Why is it that no matter what color bubble bath you use the bubbles are always white?
Is there ever a day that mattresses are not on sale?
Why do people constantly return to the refrigerator with hopes that something new to eat will have materialized?
Why do people keep running over a string a dozen times with their vacuum cleaner, then reach down, pick it up,  examine it, then put it down to give the vacuum one more chance?
Why is it that no plastic bag will open from the end on your first try?
How do those dead bugs get into those enclosed light fixtures?
Why is it that whenever you attempt to catch something that’s falling off the table you always manage to knock something else over?
In winter why do we try to keep the house as warm as it was in summer when we complained about the heat?
How come you never hear father-in-law jokes?
And my FAVORITE………
The statistics on sanity is that one out of every four persons are suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends — if they’re okay, then it’s you.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Hepatitis C — What You Need to Know


More people in the United States now die from hepatitis C each year than from AIDS, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 3.2 million Americans are currently infected with hepatitis C and the really bad news is that most people who have it don’t’ know it.

Let’s start with a definition.

According to the Mayo Clinic Hepatitis C is an infection caused by a virus that attacks the liver and leads to inflammation. Most people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have no symptoms. In fact, most people don’t know they have the hepatitis C infection until liver damage shows up, decades later, during routine medical tests.

Hepatitis C is one of several hepatitis viruses and is generally considered to be among the most serious of these viruses. Hepatitis C is passed through contact with contaminated blood. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hepatitis-c/DS00097

According to the U.S. Centers For Disease Control (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/c/cfaq.htm Hepatitis C is most commonly spread through the use of infected needles. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, Hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Now we know that people can become infected with the Hepatitis C virus during such activities as

  • Sharing needles, syringes, or other equipment to inject drugs
  • Needlestick injuries in health care settings
  • Being born to a mother who has Hepatitis C

Less commonly, a person can also get Hepatitis C virus infection through

  • Sharing personal care items that may have come in contact with another person’s blood, such as razors or toothbrushes
  • Having sexual contact with a person infected with the Hepatitis C virus

***Note, the Executive Director at HCVets.com, Tricia Lupole, indicates that the CDC information may be incorrect. She made this comment on our Facebook page.

“HCV by sex is a risk if both partners experience trauma and exchange blood…. the only cells found is seminal fluids are dead cells…. confirmed by many microbiologist. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15128350 There are 100s of studies that show this is the case but it is junk science that reins control of the message to control the funding. Lots of plans to make HCV the fall guy for bad behavior.“

In a second post she went on to say, “Yes, the CDC has quoted the same statement for about 15-20 years now. The study I posted is based on the CDC National Survey. Another sad point, last I checked. Even though we all know better the CDC says that there is not enough evidence to show tattoos are a risk factor.

AMA does not want to regulate tattoo parlors as medical procedures because they are responsible for guidance/ prevention. (The task has been given to OSHA).

Today Ms. Lupole issued this statement:

The Centers for Disease Control federal funding has decreased in recent decades, while there’s been increased demands for vaccination programs; resulting in limited resources for at-risk adults and other mandated priorities. The categorical nature of federal funding for HIV, STD, and viral hepatitis prevention limits the shifting of funds across program lines. In response to these funding woes, the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention’s (NCHHSTP) captured HCV disease and redesign public health services to fit HIV programs, instead of critical public health needs. It’s important to note that HCV disease was previously integrated into federal research that included its viral family called Flaviviridae, whose members are Yellow Fever and Dengue viruses and transmit disease through mosquitoes. The HCV genome is almost identical to Dengue virus.


NCHHSTP’s Federal mandate is an integration of existing programs with new programs, like Viral Hepatitis, developed to mirror HIV/AIDS management model based on specific risks and disease pathology. STD and Substance Abuse programs associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS received increased attention and funding, blurring the other components of these programs.

Needless to say, NCHHSTP has meet with resistance from advocates and congressional leaders, because of this effort by public health agencies to narrowly define HCV’s pathology.


Today, NCHHSTP spends half the federal resources acquired for HCV to vaccinate patients with both Hepatitis A & B vaccines. The majority of remaining resources are directed at drug and STD intervention and prevention. The STD division must qualify for its share of funding by defining HCV a sexually transmitted disease.


Despite scientific proof that HCV is not an STD, NCHHSTP promotes HCV as an STD based on a handful of studies that bring about scientific uncertainty, working against broader public health threats. Research excluded several methods by which the virus transmits to insure standard elements comply with CDC corporate agreement requirements. Thus… junk science.
Such actions suggests this poor public health response to the HCV Disease epidemic, may be the direct result of a system in disarray – seemingly captured by special interest with legal and political agendas that have negatively influenced the response. The integration approach has created disparities in access to health care and created “social labels” that have fostered discrimination, responsible for the reduction in quality of life.

The enduring legacy of “junk science” and indifference of governments, nonprofits, advocates, political parties or economic elites, have grave and global consequences given the propensity for viral transmission in provider settings as seen in current headlines.

FY 2012 Hepatitis C transmission and prevention: latest news. Massive increase of hepatitis C incidence in HIV-positive gay men in Switzerland 30 August 2012 …http://www.aidsmap.com/Hepatitis-C-transmission-and-prevention/cat/1628/

• FY 2008- No evidence of a HCV epidemic in HIV negative gay men
Dr Turner et al. Data from attendees at a London GUM clinic suggest that there is no increase in HCV infections amongst HIV negative gay men.

• FY 2007- Injection Behavior, Not Sexual Contact, Accounts for Couples’ HCV Risk NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Injection behavior, rather than sexual contact, accounts for the clustering of HCV virus (HCV) infection in heterosexual couples, according to a report in the June 1st issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

• FY 2004 No Evidence of Sexual Transmission of HCV among Monogamous Couples: Results of a 10-Year Prospective Study The risk of sexual transmission of HCV virus (HCV) infection was evaluated among 895 monogamous heterosexual partners of HCV chronically infected individuals in a long-term prospective study, which provided a follow-up period of 8,060 person-years.

Either way, CDC or not…. junk science remains junk science. Wish the outcry would focus on piercing jewelry or the reuse of razors and personal care items verses a national message about a method that is least as likely as not. This battle over CDC junk science, goes way back and is in memory of many who passed HCV on to family members, while sacrificing pleasures of the mind, body, and soul. As you can imagine, sexual transmission is a constant worry for some. Their partner may catch/transmit this deadly virus through sex, protection or not….. yet… turn right around and share razors and other items as such.  Especially the economically depressed populations.”

Most recently, though, we’ve identified another way people may become infected and through no fault of their own. Recently in a New Hampshire hospital an employee who was a drug addict and who also had Hepatitis C was found to be injecting himself with filled syringes meant for patients, refilling the syringes with a harmless liquid non-pain killer and then replacing the needles and syringes on the tray to be used again. Below is one of the original stories on this 2012 incident.

‘Serial infector’ accused of spreading hepatitis at NH hospital

U.S. Attorney’s Office | ASSOCIATED PRESS

CONCORD, N.H. — Authorities in at least six states are investigating whether a traveling hospital technician accused of infecting 30 people with hepatitis C in New Hampshire also exposed earlier patients to the liver-destroying disease.

David Kwiatkowski, a former technician at Exeter Hospital, was arrested Thursday morning at a Massachusetts hospital where he was receiving treatment. Once he is well enough to be released, he will be transferred to New Hampshire to face federal drug charges, said U.S. Attorney John Kacavas, who called Kwiatkowski, 33, a “serial infector” who worked in at least half a dozen states.

Authorities believe Kwiatkowski stole drugs from a hospital operating room in another state, but they declined to name any of the other states, saying only that they are not clustered in one part of the country. They would not say in what hospital Kwiatkowski was being treated at so he couldn’t be contacted for comment.

This story brought new attention to hospital policies on infection control, narcotics control and patient safety and has had ripple effects across the nation if not around the world.

So…the next question is, how serious is hepatitis C? Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer, or even death. It is the leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation in the United States. Approximately 15,000 people die every year from Hepatitis C related liver disease.

What are the long-term effects of Hepatitis C?

Of every 100 people infected with the Hepatitis C virus, about

  • 75–85 people will develop chronic Hepatitis C virus infection; of those,
    • 60–70 people will go on to develop chronic liver disease
    • 5–20 people will go on to develop cirrhosis over a period of 20–30 years
    • 1–5 people will die from cirrhosis or liver cancer

The CDC strongly suggests that all baby boomers born since 1945 should get tested for Hepatitis C. http://tinyurl.com/8tg28x6Baby boomers account for 2 million of the 3.2 million Americans infected with the blood-borne liver-destroying virus. CDC officials believe the new measure could lead 800,000 more boomers to get treatment and could save more than 120,000 lives.

“The CDC views hepatitis C as an unrecognized health crisis for the country, and we believe the time is now for a bold response,” said Dr. John W. Ward, the CDC’s hepatitis chief.

Several developments drove the CDC’s push for wider testing, he said. Recent data has shown that from 1999 and 2007, there was a 50 percent increase in the number of Americans dying from hepatitis C-related diseases. Also, two drugs hit the market last year that promise to cure many more people than was previously possible.

What are the Symptoms of Hepatitis C?

Here’s what WEBMD says. http://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/hepc-guide/hepatitis-c-symptoms

Most people who are infected with hepatitis C-even people who have been infected for a while-usually don’t have symptoms.

If symptoms do develop, they may include:

  • Fatigue.
  • Joint pain.
  • Belly pain.
  • Itchy skin.
  • Sore muscles.
  • Dark urine.
  • Jaundice, a condition in which the skin and the whites of the eyes look yellow.

A hepatitis C infection can cause damage to your liver (cirrhosis). If you develop cirrhosis, you may have:

  • Redness on the palms of your hands caused by expanded small blood vessels.
  • Clusters of blood vessels just below the skin that look like tiny red spiders and usually appear on your chest, shoulders, and face.
  • Swelling of your belly, legs, and feet.
  • Shrinking of the muscles.
  • Bleeding from enlarged veins in your digestive tract, which is called variceal bleeding.
  • Damage to your brain and nervous system, which is called encephalopathy. This damage can cause symptoms such as confusion and memory and concentration problems.

What Treatment is Available?

So if you have Hepatitis C, then what? There are a number of options and there might even be a cure before too long. Standard state of the art treatment today for Hepatitis C is with Peginterferon and Ribavirin which achieves a “sustained response” up to 54% of people, which means that the virus has been eliminated from their blood after stopping treatment. People with hepatitis C types 2 and 3 have sustained response rates of about 80%; people with type 1 have rates of up to 50%.

While hepatitis C treatment has come a long way, there are still drawbacks. For a person who’s newly diagnosed, a 54% cure rate may not sound great. After all, it means that about one out of two people won’t respond to treatment.

Also, hepatitis C treatment is less effective in some populations. For reasons that no one understands yet, African-Americans are less likely to benefit from treatment. And the treatments may not be safe for people with other medical conditions — such as kidney failure, heart disease, or pregnancy. Interferon can also be expensive; according to the American Academy of Family Physicians, it can cost $6,000 per year. http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=52451

It is important to note again, that while liver transplants can be very helpful to Hepatitis C patients, the procedure is not a cure but rather a delaying action and an effective one. There is some evidence that a transplant from a living donor to a patient who has been receiving the Interferon treatment could represent a cure. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kOElXz0vVg

A Possible Medicinal Cure

Gilead Science is performing multiple studies to test an experimental drug, but the trial that is possibly the most intriguing looks at a combination therapy that rolls two medicines into a single pill. Gilead hopes to advance tests of its lead hepatitis drug GS-7977 in a combination with another company medicine, GS-5885.

Bristol Myers Squibb had a promising drug but clinical trials resulted in some negative results so the company has sent the project back to the drawing board. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/24/business/bristol-myers-ends-work-on-hepatitis-c-drug.html?_r=2&

Finally, Gilead Sciences, mentioned earlier, has a drug that combined with another from Bristol Myers Squibb could be a cure, at least clinical trials seem to offer that indication but the two companies, according to Hepatitis C activist Margaret Dudley can’t seem to cooperate. She is circulating a petition to get the “cure” on the market. http://hepc-cured.com/

October is National Liver Awareness month. We hope you have found these blogs helpful and offer these links for further information.

http://www.liverfoundation.org/

http://www.nlfindia.com/index.asp

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/liver-problems/DS01133

http://tinyurl.com/92bjlup U.S. Government Link

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Prison’s Deadliest Inmate, Hepatitis C, Escaping


In our continuing series on Hepatitic C we offer this story from NBC and the Associated Press  3/14/2007

Public-health workers warn of looming epidemic of ‘silent killer’

Marcio Jose Sanchez  /  AP

VACAVILLE, Calif.  — The most dangerous thing coming out of prison these days may be something most convicts don’t even know they have: hepatitis C.

Nobody knows how many inmates have the disease; by some estimates, around 40 percent of the 2.2 million in jail and prison are infected, compared with just 2 percent of the general population.

Eventually, when they are released, medical experts predict they will be a crushing burden on the health care system, perhaps killing as many people as AIDS in years to come. At the same time, they will be carriers, spreading the disease.

Hepatitis C can be treated, but many prisons do not test for it. Among the reasons: Budgets are tight, and treatment is expensive. So prison officials close their eyes to the gathering emergency and pass it along to the outside world.

“Right now there’s a golden opportunity to bring solutions to this problem before it hits,” said Dr. John Ward, director of viral hepatitis at the National Center for HIV/AIDS at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Hepatitis C is already the most common disease of its sort in the United States — a chronic, life-threatening, blood-borne infection. It is most commonly linked to infected needles used for drugs, though prison tattoos and body piercing with non-sterile equipment are also risky.

‘Silent killer’
What makes this virus particularly insidious is that as many as half of the people who have hepatitis C don’t even know they have it. The “silent killer,” already considered epidemic by the World Health Organization, often remains dormant for decades.

Some of the infected are lucky: One in five people who get hepatitis C will clear it out of their system naturally. But without treatment, one in four will suffer liver failure or develop liver cancer. Last year liver cancer was the only one of the top 10 fatal cancers in this country to increase, in large part because of hepatitis C.

More than $1 billion is already spent each year on this country on hepatitis C, and those costs are expected to soar unless prevention and treatment are expanded.

Without those changes, researchers project that liver-related deaths will triple from around 13,000 in 2000 to 39,000 by 2030. It’s also estimated that 375,000 Americans with hepatitis C will develop cirrhosis by the year 2015.

Anita Taylor, 48, is already there, in end-stage liver disease. Taylor speaks very slowly and moves with care. She often finds that she can’t say the words she wants to — they just won’t come out. Her body hurts most of the time. Her nose bleeds a lot.

‘Doctor gave me a death sentence’
A mother of two and former heroin addict, Taylor said she learned she had hepatitis C when she was jailed in Nevada in 1991 for being under the influence of drugs.

“They tested me and told me I had hepatitis C. They didn’t tell me there was a treatment and a cure,” she said. “And I didn’t know to ask.”

Taylor’s experience is not unusual.

“The doctor gave me a death sentence, recalls Leslie Czirr, a 36-year-old parolee. “He told me, ’There’s no cure for this and you will die from it unless you are hit by a truck first,”’

Czirr learned she had hepatitis C during a prenatal examination in 1996, at a time when she wasn’t in prison. Czirr has been arrested 10 times for drug possession and served almost eight years in prison on various drug possession and dealing charges.

She has started to suffer exhaustion, brain fog and aches. She recently enrolled in a county program to be treated — treatment, she said, she was denied at California’s Norco State Prison.

“I asked and asked, but they barely want to give you a Motrin,” she said. “I really want to get well, not just for myself, but so I’m not putting anyone else at risk.”

Limited studies indicate that fewer than 10 percent of prisoners who have contracted hepatitis C are treated. The reason vary. Medical staff have other priorities, and not all are well-informed about the disease. Prisoners with short sentences are often excluded because they won’t be able to complete treatment, and drug addicts who are inclined to return to risky behavior are often turned away because it is assumed they will simply reinfect themselves.

No funding for treatment
Usually, though, it comes down to money. Prison officials say that even if they wanted to provide the treatment, it is extremely expensive — about $9,500 per patient per year — and no federal funds have been earmarked to pay for it.

“It’s a hard sell to convince taxpayers why additional resources should be spent on the health care of the incarcerated when there are a lot of people who aren’t incarcerated who don’t have adequate health care,” said Dr. Joseph Bick, chief medical officer at the California Medical Facility at Vacaville.

Many of the inmates in Vacaville’s hospice unit — reserved for those given six months or less to live — are dying from hepatitis C-related ailments. Bick said half of the prison’s 3,200 inmates have a history of having been infected with hepatitis C, and at any given time about 40 of those men are receiving the intensive drug treatment to cure it.

“I’m pretty sure this is how I got it,” said Anthony Harris, an inmate at Vacaville. He rubbed his forearm hard, as if trying to remove the prison tattoo bearing his children’s names.

Harris, 51, is a former barber serving a life sentence for second-degree murder. In 2003, a doctor at another prison told him he had Hepatitis C; he researched the disease in the prison library and has sought treatment ever since.

“They gave me shots for Hep A and B, got rid of them. I’d like to get rid of the C too,” he said. “I’m entitled to that. But some docs will give you the treatment and others won’t. I keep making appointments. I keep asking.”

The course of treatment can take a year, and involves taking pills twice a day and weekly injections. Side effects are like those associated with chemotherapy — nausea, exhaustion, depression, debilitating aches and pains — and the cure only works about half the time.

But Bick said the high cost of treating prisoners for hepatitis C is a bargain compared to the bill that would come due if these cases are left untreated. “It’s a tremendous opportunity for us to have an impact on the larger health of the community,” he said.

Dr. Lynn Taylor, an assistant professor of medicine at Brown University’s medical school, agrees that prison is “perhaps one of the best setting for treatment of high-risk individuals.”

‘Window of opportunity’ for public-health efforts
“Prison can be a window of opportunity to reduce the reservoir of infection,” she said.

But there are no federal rules about testing and treating hepatitis C. Federal guidelines, issued by the CDC in 2003, said correctional facilities should “become part of prevention and control efforts in the broader community.” But they don’t recommend screening for all inmates.

Instead, the CDC urged medical staff to ask new inmates about their risk factors, and only those prisoners who seem likely to be exposed should undergo screening, which costs $5 to $10.

The CDC guidelines fell short, said Dr. Josiah Rich, a professor at Brown who directs the university’s Center for Prisoner and Human Rights. Rich’s studies confirm that convicted criminals are almost always willing to be tested for hepatitis C, but will often lie to prison authorities about their past drug use.

“We already know that more than one in three people coming through corrections has Hep C, so by definition everyone coming in is high risk. It’s absurd that they’re not testing everyone,” he said.

Rich concedes that testing every inmate will “jack up costs” for prisons.

“An individual is going to say, ’Hey, you tested me, you said I was positive, and now I want to be treated, and I’m going to sue you if I don’t get treated,”’ he said.

Lawsuits on the rise
Lawsuits are, indeed, on the rise.

The first significant case came in 1999, when officials at the Luther Luckett Correctional Complex in La Grange, Ky., refused to allow inmate Michael Paulley access to free hepatitis C treatment. Paulley, who was serving a 25-year sentence for rape and burglary, sued and won.

But the treatment came late and he died in 2004, the year he would have been eligible for parole. The litigation prompted broader testing and treatment in Kentucky, but Paulley’s physician, Dr. Bennet Cecil, a Louisville, Ky.-based hepatitis C specialist, said prisoners still die “all the time” for untreated hepatitis C.

“I think it’s immoral if a country, a state a society is going to incarcerate somebody and then deny them necessary medical care. I think that’s an outrage,” he said.

Prisons in at least a dozen states — Alabama, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New York, Oklahoma and Virginia — are being sued over failure to treat hepatitis C.

But it’s tough going, said Oregon civil rights attorney Michelle Burroughs. Although she’s won a settlement that mandated testing for at risk inmates and treatment for those who are eligible, five of the 10 inmates she’s representing in a class-action lawsuit have died while the litigation proceeds.

5-year wait
“It’s appalling, horrendous, horrifying. Prisoners wait five years just to be evaluated,” she said.

Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., recently reintroduced legislation that would mandate prison testing and treatment of hepatitis C. Earlier similar proposals in recent years have failed.

“The plain fact is that prisoners do not stay in prison. With more than 90 percent of incarcerated persons returning to their communities, it is clear that when a prisoner is infected, we are all affected,” Lee said.

In North Dakota, it didn’t take legislation, court orders or new regulations to prompt medical services director Kathleen Bachmeier to begin screening every inmate for hepatitis C after a methamphetamine epidemic tripled her state’s prison population in about a decade. As the intravenous drug addicts arrived, so did the hepatitis C.

“It became obvious to me that these people are going to cost the state a lot of money if we don’t do something about it,” she said.

North Dakota now treats anyone who meets certain medical criteria, whose sentence is long enough to complete the course of treatment and who is willing to try to quit using drugs.

“We look at this as a huge public health initiative,” she said.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Hepatitis C — No One is Immune Everyone is Affected


More people in the United States now die from Hepatitis C each year than from AIDS  according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   More than 3.2 million Americans are currently infected with Hepatitis C and the really bad news is that most people who have it don’t’ know it.

In coming days I will publish more information and heart wrenching stories about Hep C and the patients it affects, the lives it wrecks and what it costs our society in both human lives and dollars…it is astounding.

Hep C is a disease of the liver that society likes to keep in the shadows because of some of the ways in which it is contracted, but we cannot begin to deal with a disease if it is kept secret and treated as though it was sinful and dirty.  It isn’t.  The people aren’t and they need our help and our compassion.

Hepatitis C can be treated and there are some exciting possibilities on the horizon but now there is no available cure,  not even a liver transplant is a cure because Hepatitis C is systemic.

To get us started on the road to understanding please view this video.  It says more in a few minutes than anything I can write at this moment.  Please share the video with others and then watch this space for more.  I fully intend to say a lot more on the subject of this disease that affects so many of my friends.

Thank you  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4TCo-qVoKk

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Cystic Fibrosis — The Victims are Heroes


CF is Cystic Fibrosis. Most of us know nothing about it even though we are familiar with the term. CF is a devastating disease causing constant discomfort and requiring intense and frequent treatment.

A CF patient must start every day with an extended and sometimes agonizing period of therapy. Often that therapy has to be repeated several times during the day. I’ve known several CF patients and to me they are special because of the heroic efforts they must put forward every day just to be able to approach normal functioning. Most diseases are difficult to manage but CF patients need to get physical in order to function. They are amazing people.

CF is one of those diseases in which a Lung Transplant is sometimes necessary and quite helpful but the procedure does not cure the disease. We’ll discuss that option more later.

I don’t have CF but I do have Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) so I can at least relate to the part of CF that causes difficult breathing.  The Clinical description of CF sounds bad enough but until you’ve experienced what it’s like to struggle for air it Is difficult if not impossible to understand.  One CF patient said, “It feels like you’re breathing through a small straw all the time.”

Difficult breathing alone is a terrible affliction but CF is much more than difficult breathing, it affects almost the entire body.   This definition from Medicine Net seems to sum up the disease in graphic, therefore understandable terms (http://www.medicinenet.com/cystic_fibrosis/article.htm).

“Cystic fibrosis mostly affects the lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. Mucus is a substance made by the lining of some body tissues. Normally, mucus is a slippery, watery substance. It keeps the linings of certain organs moist and prevents them from drying out or getting infected. However, if you have cystic fibrosis, your mucus becomes thick and sticky.

The mucus builds up in your lungs and blocks your airways—the tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. The buildup of mucus makes it easy for bacteria to grow. This leads to repeated, serious lung infections. Over time, these infections can severely damage your lungs.

The thick, sticky mucus also can block tubes, or ducts, in your pancreas. As a result, the digestive enzymes that your pancreas makes can’t reach your small intestine.

These enzymes help break down the food that you eat. Without them, your intestines can’t fully absorb fats and proteins. This can cause vitamin deficiency and malnutrition because nutrients leave your body unused. It also can cause bulky stools, intestinal gas, a swollen belly from severe constipation, and pain or discomfort.

Cystic fibrosis also causes your sweat to become very salty. As a result, your body loses large amounts of salt when you sweat. This can upset the balance of minerals in your blood and cause a number of health problems. Examples include dehydration (a condition in which your body doesn’t have enough fluids), increased heart rate, tiredness, weakness, decreased blood pressure, heat stroke, and, rarely, death.” The Clinical description of CF sounds bad enough but until you’ve experienced what it’s like to struggle for air it Is difficult if not impossible to understand.

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (www.cff.org/home/) Says this about the disease.

“Cystic fibrosis is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide.   An additional ten million more—or about one in every 31 Americans—are carriers of the defective CF gene, but do not have the disease. CF is most common in Caucasians, but it can affect all races”.

In the 1950s, few children with cystic fibrosis lived to attend elementary school. Today, advances in research and medical treatments have further enhanced and extended life for children and adults with CF. Many people with the disease can now expect to live into their 30s, 40s and beyond.”

The sad fact of life for the approximately 30,000 Americans who suffer from cystic fibrosis (CF) is that they must get their chests pounded at least twice a day.

Chest pounding, also known as chest percussion, loosens the thick mucus that forms in the lungs of CF patients, allowing them to cough or sneeze up mucus and consequently breathe more easily. Chest pounding is a primary therapy for treating the disease.

To achieve chest percussion, CF patients today have two main choices: they can have a respiratory therapist perform the chest-pounding or they can purchase a CF “vest.” The vest, once the patient puts it on, uses air waves to shake the whole upper body, helping to loosen mucus in the lungs.

In this video a young woman not only demonstrates the vest but has some fun with it.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEBM7ediRic&feature=related

Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis

From the Mayo Clinic

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cystic-fibrosis/DS00287/DSECTION=symptoms

Respiratory signs and symptoms
The thick and sticky mucus associated with cystic fibrosis clogs the tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. This can cause:

  • A persistent cough that produces thick spit (sputum) and mucus
  • Wheezing
  • Breathlessness
  • A decreased ability to exercise
  • Repeated lung infections
  • Inflamed nasal passages or a stuffy nose

Digestive signs and symptoms
The thick mucus can also block tubes that carry digestive enzymes from your pancreas to your small intestine. Without these digestive enzymes, your intestines can’t fully absorb the nutrients in the food you eat. The result is often:

  • Foul-smelling, greasy stools
  • Poor weight gain and growth
  • Intestinal blockage, particularly in newborns (meconium ileus)
  • Severe constipation

Frequent straining while passing stool can cause part of the rectum — the end of the large intestine — to protrude outside the anus (rectal prolapse). When this occurs in children, it may be a sign of cystic fibrosis. Parents should consult a physician knowledgeable about cystic fibrosis. Rectal prolapse in children may require surgery.

Currently, there is no cure for cystic fibrosis. However, specialized medical care, aggressive drug treatments and therapies, along with proper CF nutrition, can lengthen and improve the quality of life for those with CF.

Each day most people with CF:

  • Take pancreatic enzyme supplement capsules with every meal and      most snacks (even babies who are breastfeeding may need to take enzymes).
  • Take multi-vitamins.
  • Do some form of airway clearance at least once and sometimes up to four      or more times a day.
  • Take aerosolized      medicines—liquid medicines that are made into a mist or aerosol and then inhaled through a nebulizer.

Because CF is a complex disease that affects so many parts of the body, proper care requires specialized knowledge. The best place to receive that care is at one of the more than 110 nationwide CF Foundation-accredited care centers

Lung transplants

While lung transplants are an option for CF patients, the procedure will not cure the disease, because the defective gene that causes it is in all of the cells in the body, not just in the lungs. At this time, scientists are not able to “fix” genes permanently but they are working on it. . While a transplant does give a person with CF a new set of lungs, the rest of the cells in the body still have CF and may already be damaged by the disease. Further, organ rejection is always possible and drugs that help prevent organ rejection can cause other health problems.

Cost and available help

As is the case with most chronic diseases treating CF can become very expensive but there are programs that exist to help patients with these challenges.  Many people with CF use Cystic Fibrosis Services, Inc., a specialty pharmacy that is a subsidiary of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. It provides access to CF drugs, offers patient assistance programs and works to help resolve complex insurance issues. CF Services is a participating provider with more than 5,000 insurance plans and nearly 40 state and federally funded programs. Visit www.cfservicespharmacy.com or call (800) 541-4959.

In 2008, the CF Foundation launched the Cystic Fibrosis Patient Assistance Program (CFPAF) as a nonprofit subsidiary. The CFPAF helps people with CF (who qualify) who need FDA-approved medication or paired drug-delivery devices for the nebulized treatment of CF-related pulmonary disease, or an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of pancreatic insufficiency related to CF. Case managers at the CFPAF help people with CF with ways to reduce out-of-pocket costs for CF drugs. All funds distributed by the CFPAF are provided by grants from drug manufacturers. Visit http://www.cfpaf.org or call (888) 315-4154.

CF drug companies often offer a range of patient assistance programs — from giving out samples of new CF products, to providing free nutritional supplements, to accepting voucher payments for CF drugs. Find out more information in the Foundation’s archived Web cast entitled, ” Patient Advocacy: Issues and Answers for CF.”

Suggested resources

Cystic Fibrosis is a terrible disease and while progress is being made in treating it, lifespans for its victims are still relatively short.   If you’d like to help fund research or offer assistance in other ways contact the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation http://www.cff.org/GetInvolved/ManyWaysToGive/MakeADonation/

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Bristol Myers /Gilead Science — Profits Ahead of Life


I have a good news, bad news story to report today.  It is about a combination of life saving drugs that may never see the light of day because the two companies that make them can’t or won’t cooperate with one another.  One woman, Margaret Dudley of San Antonio Texas is doing something about it.  More about her, later.

This is about a combination of drugs from Bristol Myers Squib and Gilead Science that could be a cure for Hepatitis C which affects nearly 200 million people worldwide.  It is a viral infection that can lead to liver failure and death.  End-stage liver disease (cirrhosis) due to chronic hepatitis C has become the leading indication for liver transplantation in the United States.

First the good news, this really could be a cure.   A combination of Gilead’s GS-7977 and Daclatasvir from Bristol Myers Squib shows great promise as a cure according to some limited studies.  These drugs are pretty effective on their own but apparently when combined they could be a cure…yes cure.  I know, cure is pretty strong language in the medical world but it is the medical world that is using the term.

Now the bad news.  The two companies are not cooperating with one another, they can’t seem to agree on anything other than to disagree and in the meantime people are getting sicker and dying.  This is the classic battle over which company will make the most money when the two drugs are combined.

Here’s an Excerpt-The Street

Gilead, Bristol Put Profits Ahead of Best Care for Hep C Patients

“The new Hep C therapy at issue here combines Bristol’s Daclatasvir with Gilead’s GS-7977. Each is a single pill administered once a day. The results from this new therapy are nothing short of spectacular — an early cure rate of 100% for genotype 1 patients and 91% of genotype 2/3 patients, according to data from a mid-stage study announced Thursday at the European Association for the Study of Liver Disease (EASL) meeting.

A 100% cure rate for genotype 1 patients! Obviously, results can’t get better than that.

You’d think there’d be a rush to move the combination regimen of Daclatasvir and GS-7977 into a larger, confirmatory phase III trial, but you’d be mistaken. Amazingly, this most promising new treatment for hepatitis C patients may actually be discontinued because Bristol and Gilead can’t work together.

Good luck understanding why Bristol and Gilead can’t come together to help Hep C patients. The companies can’t even agree on the fact that the two companies are not agreeing”.

This is an incredibly important story and one that needs wide circulation in hopes of forcing these two companies to cooperate for the sake of saving lives instead of who can provide the greatest return on investment.  As mentioned earlier, Hep C affects about 200 million people worldwide.

Typically, to become infected with hepatitis C virus, the blood of an infected person enters the body of someone who is not infected. The most common way involves sharing needles or other equipment used to inject drugs. This kind of Hepatitis C infection is in the news now because an infected healthcare worker at a hospital in New Hampshire used needles on himself then left them for others to use.  Thousands may have been infected as a result and that investigation continues.

It is also possible, but less likely to become infected with shared use of personal care items such as toothbrushes and razors. Infection is also possible through sexual contact. Hepatitis C is not spread by casual contact, kissing, coughing, sneezing, sharing utensils, or breastfeeding.

Other people with greater risk of infection include:

  • People with tattoos or body piercing done with non-sterile equipment.
  • People who received an organ transplant or blood transfusion before July 1992.
  • People with clotting problems who took blood products prior to 1987.
  • People receiving hemodialysis or who have a history of hemodialysis for kidney failure.
  • People with HIV infection.

Since July 1992, all blood and organ donations in the U.S. are screened for the hepatitis C virus. According to the CDC, the number of hepatitis C infections declined by 90% from 1994 to 2006, partially as a result of this.

A diagnosis of hepatitis C infection doesn’t necessarily mean you need treatment. If you have only slight liver abnormalities, you may not need treatment, because your risk of future liver problems is very low. Your doctor may recommend follow-up blood tests to monitor for liver problems.

Hep C symptoms may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Upset stomach and diminished appetite
  • Joint and muscle pain

Also, patients may experience symptoms related to liver cirrhosis, such as:

  • Jaundice, which is a yellowing of the skin and eyes
  • Urine being a dark yellow color
  • An increased tendency to bleed or bruise

Treatment of chronic hepatitis C varies depending on the individual. A person with chronic hepatitis C may not need or benefit from treatment. Some people may not be able to tolerate treatment because of side effects.

Currently, the FDA has approved the following treatments for hepatitis C:

  • Pegylated interferon alfa-2a
  • Pegylated interferon alfa-2b
  • Ribavirin
  • Standard interferon alfa
  • Incivek
  • Victrelis

Common side effects of interferons include fatigue, muscle pain, headache, nausea, vomiting, weight loss, and depression, and changes to your blood cell counts. Side effects of ribavirin include anemia, skin rash, fatigue, and nose/sinus congestion so a new treatment with minimal side effects and greater effectiveness would be cheered wildly.

Liver transplant
if your liver has been severely damaged, a liver transplant may be an option. During a liver transplant, the surgeon removes your damaged liver and replaces it with a healthy liver. Most transplanted livers come from deceased donors, though a small number come from living donors who donate a portion of their livers.

For people with hepatitis C infection, a liver transplant is not a cure. Treatment with antiviral medications usually continues after a liver transplant, since hepatitis C infection is likely to recur in the new liver.

Now to our hero 61 year old Margaret Dudley of San Antonio, Texas.  Margaret thinks this situation is intolerable and she has launched a petition drive to encourage the two companies to work together to save lives.

Last fall, she was tested for hepatitis C she believes she contracted from some earlier tattoos.  “I had no idea,” Dudley said. “I had no reason to think it would come back positive, but it did.”

Then she found out about Bristol Myers Squib and Gilead.  “That’s basically what me and millions of others have been waiting for,” Dudley commented.  We’re asking these companies put best patient health before profits.”

She has several thousand on her online petition so far and says public pressure may spark the pharmaceutical companies to keep going with clinical trials.  Dudley’s goal is to gather 100,000 signatures by July 28, 2012, which is World Hepatitis Day.  We encourage you to sign the petition.  Just go to: http://tinyurl.com/cow2uwt  We just can’t let profitability trump human life.

Some of the information in this blog was drawn from the following sources.

http://www.hcvadvocate.org/hcsp/articles/Shaw-Stiffel-1.html

http://tinyurl.com/d55az86

http://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/hepc-guide/chronic-hepatitis-c

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

 

An Expert Explains Addiction as a Disease


While most experts and most medical associations recognize alcohol and drug addiction as a disease many of our readers disagree.  This blog and our Facebook group Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) are focused on helping those who need organ and tissue transplants get them.  That’s our purpose and our mission but many of those who don’t believe in the disease concept of chemical dependency hold strong opinions that if a person is dying of liver, kidney, heart or other organ failures and if that person has a history of alcoholism or chemical dependency they should not be eligible for an organ transplant.  The argument is, “They chose to become an addict and they should suffer the consequences.”  This topic has received more discussion than any other that we have introduced in the nearly four years Bob’s Newheart has been publishing blogs.    We hope this guest blog will help dissenters have a better understanding and perhaps more compassion for those suffering from the disease of addiction. 

Prior to my retirement to get a heart transplant in 2007 I was a private communications consultant specializing in health care issues.  One of the great rewards in my 25 plus years career was getting to meet and interact with some of the leading medical professionals in the world.  One such person, who I am proud to call a friend, is Dr. Marvin Seppala, Chief Medical Officer for the Hazelden foundation in Center City, Minnesota.  Hazelden is one of the leading and largest non-profit addiction treatment centers in the world with several U.S. Locations.  Dr. Marv is not only a highly respected physician he is also a psychiatrist who specializes in helping those who suffer from addictions.  You can read more about him and about Hazelden at http://www.hazelden.org/  

The following blog was written by Dr. Seppala  for the CNN Health website and he has graciously given his permission for us to reprint it here.   Your thoughts and comments are encouraged and welcome.

Bob Aronson

(Bob is the bob of bob’s Newheart and has been in recovery from alcoholism since 1982.  He received a heart transplant in August of 2007)

ADDICTION — THE DISEASE THAT LIES

I learned of four addiction-related deaths this weekend. Three were people I knew in Portland, Oregon, recovery circles and the fourth was Amy Winehouse.

Tragically one must get used to such news if you spend a lot of time with those who have this disease. Whenever someone with addiction dies, I grieve the lost potential and wonder about the limitations of our ability to address this cunning, baffling and powerful disease.

I am also humbled by my own experience with addiction and recovery, and grateful for the help I received.

It seems nearly impossible to believe that people with addiction would continue to use drugs and alcohol to the point of death, but that is what people with addiction do:  They  deny both the consequences and the risks of using. As we continue to learn about addiction, we’re understanding  more about  why addicted people behave the way they do. But that’s little solace for friends and family.

Addiction is a brain disease, and our knowledge of it has expanded significantly, which has informed our treatment programs and altered our perceptions. We know that addiction resides in the limbic system, a subconscious part of our brain that is involved with memory, emotion and reward.

We refer to this area of the brain as the reward center, as it ensures that all rewarding or reinforcing activities, especially those associated with our survival, are prioritized. The reward center makes sure we survive by eating, drinking fluids, having sex (for survival of the species) and maintaining human interactions.

In late stages of addiction we can see how reward-related drives, especially those for survival, are reprioritized when people risk their families, their jobs, even their lives to continue to use drugs and alcohol. The continued use of the drug becomes the most important drive, at a subconscious level and unrecognized by the individual, undermining even life itself.

When a methamphetamine-addicted mother makes the nightly news after neglecting her children for four days while on a meth run, we can’t comprehend how anyone could do such a thing and tend to think she does not love her children. She may have been going out for groceries with the intent to return home and feed her children, but ran into a dealer and started using.

Addiction took over, and she was driven by subconscious forces even though she loves her children as much as I love mine. Her love and her natural instincts to care for and nurture her children were overridden by her own brain, the reward system  reprogrammed to seek and use drugs at all costs. Unbeknownst to her, drug use has become the most important thing in her life.

When we witness the incomprehensible behaviors associated with addiction we need to remember these people have a disease, one that alters their brain and their behaviors. We tend to believe we all have free will, so it is difficult to understand how the addicts’ perception has been so altered as to drive them to destruction.

We also assume they can make their own decisions, especially when it comes to help for their addiction. In so doing we are expecting the person with a diseased brain to accept the unacceptable, that the continued use of drugs is not providing relief from the problem – it is the problem, and they need to stop that which has become paramount.

They are unable to make such decisions because their brains have been altered to prioritize use of the drugs, even above survival itself.

Relief of psychic pain, the real, unimaginable pain of addiction, is part of the problem. People have many reasons for seeking relief from pain; some pain precedes the addiction, but most pain is the result of the addiction.

The addicted neglect their primary relationships and they may lie, cheat and steal to continue drug use. And they know this at some level, they recognize their uncontrolled behaviors, but they can’t change, they can’t stop.

Hopelessness becomes a way of life. Self-loathing, shame and guilt become the norm as the consequences of continued drug use accumulate.

They use drugs to ease the pain, but the very remedy exacerbates the problem. The answer to their dilemma goes unrecognized due to the neurobiological changes that have occurred in their brains.

The good news is that treatment is effective and specifically designed to help people recognize the problem within. Most people are coerced into treatment for one reason or another; they may be facing legal issues, job loss or divorce.

With good treatment their likelihood for recovery and abstinence is just as good as the minority who seek treatment of their own accord. Unfortunately, less than 10% of those with addiction recognize they have it and seek treatment.

This is the primary reason people don’t seek help. Our largest public health problem goes unrecognized by those with the disease.

Every one of these deaths is tragic. They died of a disease that lies to them. Amy Winehouse had incredible musical talent that enthralled the masses, but she became known as much for her struggle with addiction.

We can safely watch such a tragedy, gawking as we drive by the destruction, insulated from the suffering and unable to help. But addiction is all around us and we need to respond to the rising death toll.

All of us are responsible for learning the truth about addiction, raising awareness and intervening for those who have this disease, knowing they are unlikely to be able to do so for themselves.   Dr. Marvin Seppala.

-0-

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or  positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and lovePlease view our two brand new video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on You Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifyRsh4qKF4  This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for it’s use.

Another important video is “A Transplant for Nurse Lori” this brave woman has Multiple Sclerosis and needs help paying her share of the bill for a procedure that can halt the disease in its tracks and even reverse some of it.  Watch the video at http://www.OrganTI.org.

Also…there  is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues.

We would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater  our clout with decision makers.

A Life Needs Saving Right Now. Will You Help?


Most often I write about transplants that almost everyone has heard of like heart, lung, kidney, liver and pancreas.  Today is different though. This is about how a new discovery that removes then replaces  some of a patient’s adult stem cells back to the patient and stop, even reverse the effects of Multiple Sclerosis (MS).  Studies indicate this is an amazing breakthrough.  The same procedure is being studied for use with other diseases as well.

This blog is about Emily Lori Cameron a cancer survivor who now has Multiple Sclerosis (MS) which presents her with new challenges every day.  Each day she asks herself, “Will I be able to speak clearly, will my thoughts be clear, will I be able to walk, use my hands or even know where I am and what I am doing?”   Medicare has approved a new procedure for Lori but she must raise $42,000 to pay her share of the cost.  More about that in a bit but first a little about MS.

Multiple Sclerosis is a terrible disease.  In effect the immune system attacks the protective lining around nerves, shreds it and causes communication between brain, nerves and body to become tangled and ineffective.   For example, the brain might send a message to the legs to begin walking but along the way the message gets garbled and what the legs receive is a command to relax so you fall down.  Up until the last couple of years  standard treatment which includes drugs and some physical therapy only delays the inevitable. It does not stop the progression of the disease so it certainly can’t reverse it.

Now there is a new procedure that uses one’s own adult stem cells to not only stop the disease in its tracks but to even reverse many of the existing symptoms.   This new procedure is approved by Medicare and initial studies have indicated that it is very effective, some have even called it a cure for Multiple Sclerosis.   I can’t tell you exactly how this works but apparently they will withdraw from Lori a certain amount of her adult stem cells and store them for a short while. Then she will undergo chemotherapy that will destroy the old immune system. When that is done the original adult stem cells withdrawn from Lori’s body will be injected into her again to create a new uncontaminated immune system. Initial studies indicate success rates in the high 90 percent range. Here’s a link to tell you more http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2009/01/burtms.html

So far the new treatment is approved for use in the early stages of MS so it is entirely possible that if Lori’s condition gets considerably worse, which is entirely possible, she could be removed from the approved list.  Lori’s sister has already experienced the treatment and is doing wonderfully well.  There is an urgency to Lori’s condition because we must, must, must raise the money as soon as possible so there is no chance she will be removed from the transplant list.

Just today I posted a new video on YouTube, it’s only 9 minutes long and effectively tells Lori’s story and why your donation is so critical and must be done so quickly.  You can find it at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrBJoCdIKto.  Or to be even faster you can just go directly to the highly respected National Transplant Assistance Fund (NTAF) and donate directly.  Lori has been approved by NTAF and is registered there www.ntafund.org/contribute/ Secure credit card: 800-642-8399.   You can look her up under the name Emily Lori.

This is probably the most urgent appeal I have ever made.  Lori is a nurse and a very compassionate human being.  She has sacrificed a great deal in order to help others, never asking for anything for herself but now the situation is becoming desperate.  We simply must raise $42,000.  That’s a lot of money but when that’s all it takes to save a human life it should not be an insurmountable obstacle.  Please dig deep…forsake the Latte for a few days, or a beer, or a pack of cigarettes or that sweater you really wnted and send the money to Lori instead.  If we can do that Lori will have the financial support she needs very quickly.  Can you stand by and watch someone die?  I think not…send what you can 50 cents, a dollar, ten dollars…all of it will add up and we can save this precious human life.

Please view another of our recent videos, “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on You
Tube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifyRsh4qKF4  This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for it’s use. 

Also…there  is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. We would love to have you join our Facebook grou[, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater  our clout with decision makers.

Please  comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or  positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

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