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From Farm to Fork — How Safe Is Our Food?


Food safety cartoonThe very food that we need to help us grow and live, could also cause us to become ill and die.   Food — we cannot live without it, but it can pose great danger.   Let’s look at cold hard reality.  Our food supply, our food storage systems and our cooking and eating habits may be responsible for a great deal of misery.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) estimates that contaminated food sickens approximately 76 million Americans, leading to some 325,000 hospitalizations and 5,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.

Food safety is particularly important to anyone with a take proactive measurescompromised immune system because we just don’t have the ability to fight infections whether they are bacterial or viral.  Certainly people who have had organ transplants fall into that category.  Transplant recipients must be especially careful.

As I started to research this posting the first question that popped into my mind was, “Which foods are most likely to make me sick. I found this list of the top ten from the Center for Science in the Public Interest as reprinted in the Fiscal Times

1) Leafy Greensleafy greens

Lettuce and spinach may be on the top of most nutritionists’ lists, but they’re also among the foods most linked to outbreaks of illness. The contaminations often starts at the farm through contact with wild animals or manure.

*Source: The Center for Science in the Public Interest

– See more at: http://www.thefiscaltimes.com/Media/Slideshow/2013/12/02/10-Foods-Most-Likely-Make-You-Sick#sthash.CTYjKR8I.dpuf

2) Eggs

The risk for salmonella makes eggs the second-most popular source of food-based illnesses. Consumers can protect themselves by fully cooking all eggs and eating or storing eggs promptly after cooking.

3) Tuna

tunaIf not properly stored immediately after being caught, tuna begins to decay and can release scrombotoxin, which can cause food poisoning.

4) Oysters

Raw or undercooked oysters can breed vibrio bacteria, which can cause mild food poisoning in healthy individuals and life-threatening illness among those with a weakened immune system. Best practices in preparing oysters is to discard any open shells before cooking, and any shells that didn’t open while cooking.

5) Potatoes

Baked potatoes become breeding grounds for botulism when they’re wrapped in foil and left out to cool too long. Unwrap potatoes after baking them, and store them in a cool, dark place before cooking.

6) Cheesecheese

Sticking with pasteurized cheese greatly reduces the risk of bacteria, but some soft cheeses—even those made with pasteurized cheese—are vulnerable to contamination during the cheese-making process.

7) Ice Cream

Everyone may scream for this summer treat, but when it’s made with undercooked eggs the cold stuff can become dangerous. Even store-bought ice cream can breed bacteria when it’s put back in the freezer after unfreezing.

8) Tomatoes

Salmonella can contaminate tomatoes on the farm via the roots, flowers or cracks in the skin. If an infected tomato is eaten raw, it has a high risk of infecting the person who consumers it.

9) Sprouts

utsThe humid settings ideal for cultivating sprouts are also model conditions for salmonella, listeria and E. Coli. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that children, the elderly, pregnant women, and those with a weakened immune systems should avoid eating sprouts all together.

10) Berries

Strawberries, blackberries, and blueberries have been linked to a number of food-borne illness outbreaks in recent year. Last summer, a hepatitis A outbreak the sickened 150 people was traced back to frozen organic berries.

The Importance of Temperature

thermometerInadequate food temperature control is the most common factor contributing to food borne illness. Disease causing bacteria grow particularly well in foods high in protein such as meats, poultry, seafood, eggs, dairy products, cooked vegetables such as beans, and cooked cereal grains such as rice. Because of the high potential for rapid bacterial growth in these foods they are known as “potentially hazardous foods.”

Temperature Danger Zone

The temperature range at which bacteria grow best in potentially hazardous foods is between 41F. and 140F. The goal of all temperature controls is to either keep foods entirely out of this “danger zone” or to pass foods through this “danger zone” as quickly as possible.

So now you know which foods may pose the greatest threat to your health, but there are other factors that should concern us as well.  For example:

America’s food safety system has not been fundamentally modernized in more than 100 years.

Twenty states and D.C. did not meet or exceed the national average rate for being able to identify the pathogens responsible for foodborne disease outbreaks in their states.

Ensuring the public can quickly and safely receive medications during a major health emergency is one of the most serious challenges facing public health officials.  Sixteen states have purchased less than half of their share of federally-subsidized antivirals to use during a pandemic flu outbreak.

The main culprits are familiar. They include:

  • lmonellaSalmonella, bacteria that cause over 1.5 million illnesses per year. These commonly reside in uncooked poultry and eggs. Recent outbreaks have been linked to peanut butter, alfalfa sprouts and tomatoes.
  • E. coli 0157:H7, a dangerous bacterial strain that can cause kidney failure, turns up disproportionately in ground beef. Lately it’s been linked to spinach and pre-made cookie dough. (For a complete list, see the full report, which details also the geographical distribution of food-borne illnesses in the U.S.) You can read and learn more here http://tinyurl.com/k64har2

There are three types of hazards in a food manufacturing process: physical, chemical and biological. Foreign objects are the most obvious evidence of a contaminated product and are therefore most likely to be reported by production or by consumer complaints. However, they are also less likely than chemical or biological contaminants to affect large numbers of people.

Attributing illness to foods is a challenge for several reasons.  There are thousands of different foods, and we eat many varieties prepared in different ways, even in a single meal.  For the vast majority of foodborne illnesses, we simply don’t know which food is responsible for an illness.

One way to develop a fairly accurate estimate is to use  data collected during investigations of a food illness outbreak.   These investigations provide direct links between foodborne illnesses and which foods are responsible for them.

According to the National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases, there are more than 250 known foodborne diseases. They can be caused by bacteria, viruses, or parasites. Natural and manufactured chemicals in food products also can make people sick. Some diseases are caused by toxins or poisons from the disease-causing microbe or germ, others are caused by your body’s reaction to the germ.

foodborne diseaseTypes of Foodborne Diseases as supplied by the National Institutes of Health (click on each one for details including symptoms and treatment or click this link for the NIH website http://www.niaid.nih.gov/)

Botulism, Campylobacteriosis, E. coli, Hepatitis A, Norovirus Infection, Salmonellosis, Shigellosis, Prevention

So how do you avoid these unpronounceable diseases?  Besides the information provided on the links to each disease, you might also want to make note of the following helpful suggestions

No matter how busy you are, from top to bottom, a clean kitchen is a main line of defense for your family and the prevention of food poisoning.  You simply must eliminate the breeding grounds for dangerous bacteria.

  •  Wash your hands often – front and back, between fingers, under fingernails – in warm soapy water for at least 20 seconds (or two choruses of “Happy Birthday”) before and after every step in preparing or eating foods. That includes your kitchen helpers, such as children.
  • Clean all work surfaces often to remove food particles and spills. Use hot, soapy water. Keep nonfood items – mail, newspapers, purses – off counters and away from food and utensils. Wash the counter carefully before and after food preparation.
  • wash dishesWash dishes and cookware in the dishwasher or in hot, soapy water, and always rinse them well. Remember that chipped plates and china can collect bacteria.
  • Change towels and dishcloths often and wash them in the hot cycle of your washing machine. Allow them to dry out between each use. If they are damp, they’re the perfect breeding ground for bacteria.
  • Throw out dirty sponges or sterilize them by rinsing the sponge and microwaving it for about two minutes while still wet. Be careful, the sponge will be hot.

Pay close attention to the refrigerator and the freezer – shelves, sides and door – where foods are stored. Pack perishables in coolers while you clean or defrost your refrigerator or freezer.

Splatters inside your microwave can also collect bacteria, so keep it clean.

Physical Hazards

We’ve talked a lot about diseases and illnesses but our health is also subject to physical hazards.  You can view a University of Nebraska Slide show on the subject here: http://tinyurl.com/k6k4qow

What is a physical hazard?

We’ve all heard the stories about Rocks, insects and other things showing up in soda and beer cans.  While those instances are rare, they still happen.  Any extraneous object or foreign matter in food which may cause illness or injury to a person consuming the product is a physical hazard. These objects include bone or bone chips, metal flakes or fragments, injection needles, BB’s or shotgun pellets, pieces of product packaging, stones, glass or wood fragments, insects, personal items, or any other foreign matter not normally found in food.

The 8 most common food categories implicated in reported foreign object complaints are bakery products, soft drinks, vegetables, infant’s foods, fruits, cereals, fishery products and chocolate and cocoa products.  Below you will find a list of hazards, their effect and the treatment.  You can find more detailed information by clicking on this link http://tinyurl.com/mbktawq

These materials have been found in food and can cause severe trauma, bleeding, cuts and even death.  In many cases surgery is required to correct the damage caused by; Glass, wood, stones, bullets, BBs, needles, jewelry, metal, .Insects and other contaminated material, building materials, bone, plastic and personal effects

As with any topic it is sometimes difficult to separate fact from fiction.  There are so many rumors, old Wives tales and myths people often think they are doing the right thing when in fact they may be making matters worse.  We can’t dispel all the rumors, but we can address a few.

Food Safety Myths Exposed

http://www.foodsafety.gov/keep/basics/myths/

We all do our best to serve our families food that’s safe and healthy, but some common myths about food safety might surprise you.

MYTH: Food poisoning isn’t that big of a deal. I just have to tough it out for a day or two and then it’s over.

FACT: Many people don’t know it, but some foodborne illnesses can actually lead to long-term health conditions, and 5,000 insectAmericans a year die from foodborne illness. Get the FACTs on long-term effects of food poisoning.

MYTH: It’s OK to thaw meat on the counter. Since it starts out frozen, bacteria isn’t really a problem.

FACT: Actually, bacteria grow surprisingly rapidly at room temperatures, so the counter is never a place you should thaw foods. Instead, thaw foods the right way.

MYTH When cleaning my kitchen, the more bleach I use, the better. More bleach kills more bacteria, so it’s safer for my family.

FACT: There is actually no advantage to using more bleach than needed. To clean kitchen surfaces effectively, use just one teaspoon of liquid, unscented bleach to one quart of water.

MYTH I don’t need to wash fruits or vegetables if I’m going to peel them.

FACT: Because it’s easy to transfer bacteria from the peel or rind you’re cutting to the inside of your fruits and veggies, it’simportant to wash all produce, even if you plan to peel it.

poultryMYTH: To get rid of any bacteria on my meat, poultry, or seafood, I should rinse off the juices with water first.

FACT: Actually, rinsing meat, poultry, or seafood with water can increase your chance of food poisoning by splashing juices (and any bacteria they might contain) onto your sink and counters. The best way to cook meat, poultry, or seafood safely is tomake sure you cook it to the right temperature.

MYTH: The only reason to let food sit after it’s been microwaved is to make sure you don’t burn yourself on food that’s too hot.

FACT: In FACT, letting microwaved food sit for a few minutes (“standing time”) helps your food cook more completely by allowing colder areas of food time to absorb heat from hotter areas of food.

MYTH: Leftovers are safe to eat until they smell bad.

FACT: The kinds of bacteria that cause food poisoning do not affect the look, smell, or taste of food. To be safe, use our Safe Storage Times chart to make sure you know the right time to throw food out.

MYTH: Once food has been cooked, all the bacteria have been killed, so I don’t need to worry once it’s “done.”

FACT: Actually, the possibility of bacterial growth actually increases after cooking, because the drop in temperature allows bacteria to thrive. This is why keeping cooked food warmed to the right temperature is critical for food safety.

MYTH: Marinades are acidic, which kills bacteria—so it’s OK to marinate foods on the counter.

FACT: Even in the presence of acidic marinade, bacteria can grow very rapidly at room temperatures. To marinate foods safely, it’s important to marinate them in the refrigerator.

MYTH: If I really want my produce to be safe, I should wash fruits and veggies with soap or detergent before I use them.

FACT: In FACT, it’s best not to use soaps or detergents on produce, since these products can linger on foods and are not safe for consumption. Using clean running water is actually the

cookie doughMYTH: Only kids eat raw cookie dough and cake batter. If we just keep kids away from the raw products when adults are baking, there won’t be a problem!

FACT: Just a lick can make you sick!
No one of any age should eat raw cookie dough or cake batter because it could contain germs that cause illness. Whether it’s pre-packaged or homemade, the heat from baking is required to kill germs that might be in the raw ingredients. The finished, baked, product is far safer – and tastes even better! So don’t do it! And remember, kids who eat raw cookie dough and cake batter are at greater risk of getting food poisoning than most adults are.

MYTH: When kids cook it is usually “heat and eat” snacks and foods in the microwave. They don’t have to worry about food safety – the microwaves kill the germs!

FACT: Microwaves aren’t magic!
It’s the heat the microwaves generate that kills the germs! Food cooked in a microwave needs to be heated to a safe internal temperature. Microwaves often heat food unevenly, leaving cold spots in food where germs can survive. Kids can use microwaves properly by carefully following package instructions. Even simple “heat and eat” snacks come with instructions that need to be followed to ensure a safe product. Use a food thermometer if the instructions tell you to!

MYTH: When kids wash their hands, just putting their hands under running water is enough to get the germs off.

How to wash handsFACT: Rubbing hands with water and soap is the best way to go!
Water is just part of what you need for clean hands! Washing hands properly is a great way to reduce the risk of food poisoning. Here’s how: Wet your hands with clean, running water and apply soap. Rub them together to make a lather and scrub them well; be sure to scrub the backs of hands, between fingers, and under nails. Continue rubbing for at least 20 seconds. Sing the “Happy Birthday” song twice to time yourself! Rinse hands well under running water. Dry your hands using a clean towel, paper towel, or an air dryer.

MYTH: My kids only eat pre-packaged fruits and veggies for snacks because those snacks don’t need to be washed before they eat them.

FACT: Read your way to food safety!
Giving your kids healthy snacks is a big plus for them! But just because produce is wrapped, it doesn’t always mean it’s ready to eat as is. Read the label of your product to make sure it is says: “ready-to-eat,” “washed,” or “triple washed.” If it does, you’re good to go! If it doesn’t, wash your hands and then rinse the fruits or vegetables under running tap water. Scrub firm items, such as melons and cucumbers, with a clean produce brush. Dry with a clean cloth towel or paper towel to further reduce germs that may be present.

While federal, state and local agencies provide a valuable service with their contributions to our food safety, the primary responsibility is yours.  Too many of us become too careless with our food preparation and storage procedures and each of us needs to pay far more attention to the cleanliness of the areas in which we prepare food and to the cleanliness of the food itself.

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bob minus Jay full shotBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes.

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A Better Way to Combat Obesity


By Dr. Priscilla Diffie-Couch

Introduction by Bob Aronson

Obesity is an equal opportunity disease.  It is no respecter of age, gender, race or religion.  It is deadly and growing so that it now affects more than a third of U.S. adults (nearly 80 million people).  According to the Obesity Society, 69 percent of American adults are either affected by obesity or having excess weight.  http://www.obesity.org/resources-for/what-is-obesity.htm

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) says the combination of poor diet and physical inactivity cause about 300.000 deaths a year, the second leading cause of preventable death in the U.S.

Obesity puts individuals at risk for more than 30 chronic health conditions including:  type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension, gallstones, heart failure, fatty liver disease, sleep apnea, GERD, stress incontinence, heart failure, degenerative joint disease, birth defects, miscarriages, asthma, and numerous cancers.

Priscilla Diffie-Couch E.E.D. has been researching and writing about health issues for over two decades.  Her reporting is factual, objective, helpful and frank. She is a frequent contributor to Bob’s Newheart.

A Better Way to Combat Obesity

By Priscilla Diffie-Couch E.E.D

dead 24 hrs

Obesity is more than an abundance of food and a shortage of exercise.  It is more than the substitution of sugar for fat or the easy access to cheap fast foods.  Few would question the ever-increasing obsession with food or need to get to the root of that problem.  But too few treat obesity as a genuine threat.  Yet what good does it do to make the world safe from terrorism while we watch millions of people being held hostage by food until they eat themselves to death?

obese person on airplaneWhat caused Americans to get so fat?  Research is replete with the absolute proof that eating fat does not cause us to get fat   ( www.wnyc.org/story/eatingfatdoesntmakeusfat).    In fact, we have learned that the introduction of low-fat food into our diet was one of the greatest health mistakes ever made.  We have only learned lately that, with the exception of transfat, fat is not a culprit in causing disease.  On the contrary, when we remove fat from our diet, we deprive ourselves of vital nutrients that prevent disease, in particular, vitamin D ( medicinenet.com/ vitamin_d_deficiency/related…/index.htm ).

A shocking number of diseases are associated with low levels of vitamin D:  Alzheimer’s, dementia, diabetes, fatty liver, high blood pressure, Chron’s disease, allergy, MS, depression, osteopenia, cancer, rickets, cystic fibrosis, celiac disease and obesity itself.  Reliable recent evidence shows that many Americans are short of vitamin D (health.usnews.com/…/many-americans-fall-short-on-their-vitamind).

Making matters worse, obese people do not make as much vitamin D3 in their guts as normal weight people do.  That exacerbates the shortage of vitamin D.  In one study obese subjects had significantly lower basal 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and higher parathyroid hormone concentrations than did age-matched control subjects.  Evaluation of blood vitamin D3 concentrations 24 hours after whole-body irradiation showed that the incremental increase in vitamin D3 was 57% lower in obese than in non-obese subjects (ajcn.nutrition.org/content/72/3/690.abstract).

Besides the fact that low levels of vitamin D contribute to obesity and obesity further reduces levels of vitamin D, we are caught in another vicious cycle.  Omitting fat deprives us of the unequalled satiating power of full-fat foods.  That circles us right back into further weight gain.

Another result compounds the problem.  Food without fat loses much of its flavor.  So food manufacturers fill that void with added sugar and

sugarsalt.  But neither the presence of sugar or salt is independently responsible for the fattening of America.  Our bodies have always been able to tolerate salt and sugar in controlled amounts.  It is the unregulated unparalleled quantities of sugar in our foods–not ingested fat–that turns to fat in the human body.

Upon closer observation, it is not just the quantity of sugar that causes our bodies to lose essential metabolic control.  It turns out that simple carbohydrates in any food form are treated the same as sugar when we ingest them.  Table sugar and white bread work equally efficiently to impair our body’s ability to use insulin.  And that causes constant hunger and disease and bulging bodies.  Bulging bodies crave food.

So someone came up with the brilliant idea of replacing sugar in food and drink.  Along came the introduction of sugar substitutes, possibly the second biggest health mistake ever made.  Recent research strongly suggests that sweeteners cause blood sugar spikes.  (See the study published in Nature, September 17, 2014 “Artificial Sweeteners Induce Glucose Intolerance by Altering Gut Bacteria.”)  The negative consequences are the same–possibly worse.  Drinks sweetened with sugar substitutes have zero calories.  So we happily consume greater quantities of sugar-free food and drink with abandon, never realizing how much this contributes to our weight problem.

That still does not fully explain why we are getting more and more obese as a nation.  Obviously, easy access to abundant food and drink of any whole heaalth sourcekind makes it harder to control our weight.  The super-sizing of everything we eat is now so common that we feel cheated if we are offered what once was a normal sized hamburger or portion of fries.  The original six ounce soda now seems like a drink intended for a small child.  Just as we have readjusted our view of what is overweight because there are so many more overweight people than ever before, we have readjusted our view of portion size.  That results in eating far more calories than ever before.Is quantity then the real culprit in packing on the pounds?  Without a doubt, it is a major contributor to obesity.  A summary reported in April of this year by Whole Health Source charts the rise in calorie intake and its impact on obesity.  “Calorie Intake and the U.S. Obesity Epidemic” points out that Americans increased their total calorie intake by 363 calories a day between 1960 and 2009.  Surprisingly, during this time obesity has trebled yet we have cut our intake of fat from 45% of total calorie to less than 33%.  What is not so surprising is that we now consume mostly simple carbohydrates.  (www.hsph.harvard.educ/nutritionsource/fats-full-story/).

Substituting simple for complex carbohydrates changes the food equation.  What is almosthigh fiber super stars always missing when we eat the wrong foods in any quantity is fiber.  Fiber is a magic agent that prevents sweetened food and drink from causing a sharp insulin spike (www.sharecare.com/health/type-2…/food-and-blood-sugarlevels).  Fiber is the friendly element in food that causes us to detect texture and tricks our stomachs into feeling fuller on less quantity.  We need from 25 to 35 grams of fiber daily.  Yet it impossible to find a single meal when we eat out that offers more than two or three grams of fiber, if that.  Even when we eat at home, we fill our plates with everything but fiber.

Eating to stay slim requires daily monitoring of what we put in our bodies.  It is not easy.  Yet, Americans have continued to search for some simple formula for fighting the fat that creeps on to our bodies more readily with each passing year.  Diet pills don’t work.  Diet plans are a dismal failure.

It goes without saying that Americans are less active now than ever before in history.  The sad fact is that, the obesity on wheelsfatter people are, the harder it is to be active.  Slim people tell fat people to walk.  They can’t.  Many rely on riding on special carts to even be able to navigate through the grocery store.  The amount of effort required to lose only a few pounds causes too many of the overweight and obese simply to give up.

So what is the solution to obesity?  No one seems to know.  Individually, however, I feel certain that we could make a discernible dent in the problem by doing something very simple.  Retrain ourselves and our children to abide by the nutrition rules that worked so well back when obesity was a rare burden.  Every meal should consist of single portions on a 10-inch dinner plate (except for salad) consisting of 30% full fat, 30% protein, and 60%  complex carbohydrates, which contain multiple grams of fiber.  Substantial gains in loss of fatness could be achieved if we asked ourselves before every meal or snack, “Where is the fiber?”

Allowing ourselves and our children dessert only if we followed the rules for healthy eating spelled out above would provide a bonus for maintaining a healthy weight.

But most of us know what we should do individually to avoid getting fat. Having that knowledge has yet to solve the obesity problem.  We have been left alone too long.  Sporadic solutions are not the answer.  Companies that have independently created incentive programs that reward people who lose weight find themselves subject to discrimination lawsuits.

I cringe as I write these words but I have come to believe that we have no choice but to get the government of every nation with an obesity problem directly involved.  Independent drug researchers are never going to discover the magic fat-dissolving pill.  National research agencies must be fully funded to seek causes and solutions for the world-wide obesity malady.  New standards for defining obesity must be based on actual medical outcomes.  Validity of using Body Mass Index or waist circumference for predicting negative health effects must be re-examined and adjusted for age.  Meanwhile, steps need to be taken to implement workable plans to gain a foothold in arresting obesity.  I have never been an advocate of total government intervention.  But, when every possible private option has been exhausted, imposing universal programs may be the only answer.

The government must step up to reduce the burden of being fat.  There are at least 300,000 reasons why.  That is the number of deaths per year in the US estimated to be associated with obesity.  More than 78 million Americans can now be classified as obese.  That is more than the combined populations of California, Texas and New York.  If the current trend continues, by 2030 that number will increase to a shocking 45 to 51% of the population.

Obesity is now the second leading preventable cause of death in our country.  It is linked to sixtydeaths from obesity chronic conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, osteoporosis, breast cancer and others.  It is now safer to smoke, drink to excess, or be impoverished than it is to be obese.

The fatter we get, the less active we are.  The less active we are, the sicker we get.  The sicker we get, the greater the demand for costly drugs and hospital care and doctor visits. The more we spend on medical care, the more stress we feel.  The more stress we feel, the more we turn to food.  Clearly, the problem of obesity has ballooned into a never-ending cycle.

This cycle is not easily broken.  Sadly, in a routine trip to the grocery store, we can see a disturbing number of people so obese that they could have been found only in “freak” shows fifty years ago.  We are no longer surprised to see a rack of size 5X clothing on display at Wal-Mart.  Ironically, the fatter we get, the fewer of us see ourselves as fat.  By current definition, an ordinary person six foot tall who weighs 221 pounds is classified as obese.  But because one in three Americans is now overweight, our perception of “fatness” has changed.  Fat people look at fatter people with disgust.  Other people are fat.  We just need to lose a few pounds. 

Losing pounds is not easy.  Studies show that most of us underestimate our calorie intake and overestimate our level of activity. Fat people sit on the sidelines while others ride bikes, hit obese chldrentennis balls and swim.  Fat kids watch TV and sit in front of computers while their slimmer counterparts run and play.  The multi-billion dollar diet industry has failed.  The misguided low-fat diet craze has failed.  The only success story we can point to is the supersizing of America.

What will it take to break this supersizing cycle?  Thirteen years later, we are still aware of the changes in our lives prompted by the attack on 9-11-2001.  If terrorists had killed 300,000 Americans that day—as obesity does each year–it is hard to imagine the extent of government intervention in our lives aimed at protecting our safety and well-being.

What will it take to wake us up?  Obesity now claims more lives than illicit drug use, car and plane wrecks combined.  In 2009 alone, obesity cost our nation $152 billion.  These enormous costs are borne by us all. They show no signs of abating.  Individual efforts to curb obesity have failed.  That leaves little choice but to turn to the government for solutions.

The specific role of government should take the form of incentives, not mandates like those used in national security.  Medical research needs to be funded to provide clear guidance for designing programs that can break the cycle of disease and disorders resulting from being fat.  Government must first focus on finding out why we are fat and then on prevention.  Providing specific incentives associated with being fit not fat must be incorporated into the infrastructure of our lives.  A massive campaign must be mounted to make the public aware of these new programs.

Such government programs should begin early in our public schools.  Required physical education classes should be reinstated from primary through the twelfth grade.  Physical fitness should be given prestigious treatment among honors awarded to students of all ages.  Teachers in every field of study should be rewarded for creating curricula that require students to get up move around the classroom.  School systems should receive monetary incentives for the number of students they graduate that are not fat.  Government recognition of healthy fit kids should once again become a central concern of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Nutrition courses should be required at all grade levels.  Schools should be rewarded for increasing the number of students who stay on campus and eat nutritious meals.  Healthy snack breaks should be a part of daily school ritual at every level so that teachers can verbally reward students who actually eat their fruit.  Tax payer money should not be spent on school lunch programs that compete with fast-food fare.  Advertisements of non-nutritious foods—as has been done with alcoholic beverages and cigarettes–must be banned from television and certainly in the schools.  Deals between schools and the soft drink industry must be ended.

Programs for adults must also be designed to provide incentives for not being fat.  Providing discounts for drugs required because of conditions caused by obesity is counterproductive.  Doing so not only fails to discourage weight gain, but it also ignores what studies show to be the number one medicine to prevent and treat common diseases.  It does not come in a bottle.  It is called exercise.  Exercise, we now know, is superior tTop 20 exercise benefitso Prozac for treating mild to moderate depression.  Exercise can reverse certain kinds of heart disease and do away with the need for medicine to control blood sugar.  Abundant research shows that even light weight-lifting can enable elderly people to get up out of their wheel chairs and walk after only few weeks.   A proper diet and exercise can free many people with high blood pressure from medication.  Something as simple as daily brisk walks can produce far more dramatic results than drugs in how fat and fit we are.

Ways for identifying people eligible for health discounts can be established.  People who get a driver’s license must pass written and driving tests.  Safe drivers and home owners get discounts on insurance.  Similar systems can be set up to reward fit people when they apply for health insurance.  A certificate from a doctor can show the results of blood tests, blood pressure readings and other health measures that indicate fitness.  Scales can easily give readings on site.  Just as cars are given a sticker showing they have passed inspection, centers of fitness and nutrition can be certified to provide evidence of completion of nutrition tests and other requirements that must be met for various levels of discount entitlement.  Discounts for proven health supplements, as opposed to drugs to treat the maladies associated with obesity, can be awarded as part of the fitness incentive program. Obviously, such programs would demand universal fitness standards based on valid current research and updated upon discoveries in medical science.   For example, safe limits for cholesterol need to be reviewed just as blood pressure limits have recently been changed for older folks.

Goals and measurements must be stated in language that confronts the negative consequences of our present behavior.  As a communication specialist, I know that words influence behavior.  We have to stop beating around the verbal bush.  “Fat” and “obese” must be clearly defined and used openly to denote where we are and what we need to change.  We must stop fooling ourselves and our children.  Fat is not fun or funny or beautiful.  Fat is costly and risky.  And too often deadly.

The failure rate in managing our fatness and fitness has remained too high for too long.  We don’t need to spend more tax dollars on helping people buy more drugs or use more health care.  We should not be handing out tickets to help people end up in an early grave.  Exercise is free and eating right can be done without extra cost.  Doing both will save us all billions of health care dollars each year.

Federal intervention sounds like a nasty solution to some.  To the contrary, it can be accomplished by built-in rewards for those of us who successfully assume greater personal responsibility for our health, nutrition, and fitness.  And those of us who are already fit and healthy reap our rewards by not being forced to subsidize those who are not.

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An award winning high school speech and English teacher, Priscilla Diffie-Couch went on to get her ED.D. from Oklahoma State University, priscilla picturewhere she taught speech followed by two years with the faculty of communication at the University of Tulsa.  In her consulting business later in Dallas, she designed and conducted seminars in organizational and group communication.

An avid tennis player, she has spent the last twenty years researching and reporting on health for family and friends.  She has two children, four grandchildren and lives with her husband Mickey in The Woodlands, Texas.

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A message from Bob Aronson.bob half of bob and jay photoBob’s Newheart was established to support and help everyone, but particularly those who need or have had organ transplants.  Some of our blogs are specifically related to donation/transplantation issues while others are more general, but they are all related.  Because anti-rejection drugs compromise immune systems, transplant recipients are more susceptible to a variety of diseases.  We provide general health and medical information to help them protect themselves while at the same time, helping others live healthier lives and avoid organ failure.

Bob’s Newheart mission is three-fold; 1) to provide news and information that promotes healthier living so people won’t need transplants; 2) To help recipients protect their new organs and; 3) to do what we can to ensure that anyone who needs an organ can get one.   About 7,000 Americans die every year while waiting for a life-saving organ.  I am sure you will agree that should not happen.

In the U.S. the great majority of people support organ donation, but only about 40% of us officially become organ donors.  Many have good intentions but just don’t get around to it.  It is hard to accept, but no one knows how long they will live.  My transplanted heart came from a 30 year old man.  I’m sure he had no intention of being a donor at that age.  If you are not yet a donor, please register at www.donatelife.net it only takes a few seconds. Then, tell your family so there is no confusion when the time comes to donate.  One organ donor can save or positively affect the lives of up to 60 people.  There is no nobler thing you can do than becoming an organ donor.

Bob Aronson Founder of Bob’s Newheart Established November 3, 2007

Stop Eating What’s Killing You! Great Tasting Food Ideas ~ Less Salt and Sugar


By Bob Aronson

ambulance

Tired of paying for expensive prescription drugs?   Sick to death of the high cost of health care?  Frustrated with trying to find affordable insurance that actually covers something? Upset because your employer doesn’t offer insurance?

There is a solution…at least a partial solution and that is to take better care of yourself.  Mos of our ills are brought on  by our lifestyles by the fact that we eat wrong, don’t exercise and abuse our bodies in a million other ways.

Sugar is not healthy. We know that products loaded with sugar are not healthy and we know that foods with saturated fat are not healthy but we eat them anyway.  Why is that?  Simple answer.  They are fast, easy and they really taste good!

hands holding a big mac

The rap on eating healthy is that really healthy stuff usually doesn’t taste very good.  Let’s face it, when you take away the salt, fat and sugar food can be pretty bland.  The taste buds send frantic messages to the brain pleading for relief, “C’mon…just a little more salt…blechhh this tastes awful.”

What we are really saying is that compared to what we have been eating a healthier diet has no taste at all.  The fact is the taste of healthier foods is quite distinct, it’s just that all that salt, sugar and fat have masked it and your taste buds need some retraining.

Years ago when I was first told that I might need a heart transplant some day and that I had to change my diet if I wanted to live long enough to get one I was advised to severely limit the amount of sodium in my diet.  At the most I could have 2,000  milligrams (2 grams} of sodium per day.  When you consider that a Papa John’s 14 inch Pepperoni Pizza with original crust has 825 mgs of sodium per slice and you rarely eat just one slice, you could easily consume your entire day’s allocation of sodium at one sitting.papa johns pizza 2

I used to love salt and still do but I have learned to restrain myself.  I was one of those guys who salted everything even before I tasted it.  I would put salt on a sausage, pepperoni and extra cheese pizza as soon as it arrived at the table.  I used to put salt in my beer, too, so when I could no longer do that all my favorite foods suddenly tasted terrible.  That’s when a huge neon sign appeared over my head flashing the message, “It wasn’t the pIzza you loved, it was the salt!”salt shakerWanting to live a little longer I took the advice of my physicians and I cut salt intake in two ways.  First I did not add salt to anything.  Secondly I began to study the labels on food in the grocery store. food label Limiting yourself to 2 grams of sodium a day is very difficult and for a while you will not like what you are eating – it tastes bland.  your taste buds will scream for salt as loudly as a heroin addicts brain screams for narcotic relief.  Slowly, though, your taste buds recover from a decades long carpet bombing of sodium … and the real taste of food begins to emerge.  Green beans have a distinct taste; pasta, has a taste of its own; even a good lean steak has a unique taste when you remove the salt and the steak sauce and the ketchup, too…sorry.

Don’t get me wrong, we need salt to keep our bodies functioning properly but, we don’t need much (e.g., between about 180 mg and 500 mg per day).

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) The Institute of Medicine recommends 1500 mg of sodium per day as the Adequate Intake level for most Americans and advises everyone to limit sodium intake to less than 2300 mg per day, the Tolerable Upper Limit.sodium facts for the U.S.

Once you overcome the taste issue you will begin to enjoy food again. But you don’t have to do it cold turkey.  There are plenty of good substitutes for salt that add a dash of extra flavor without being a threat to your health.  For example

Here’s some advice from the famed Cleveland Clinic

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/prevention/askdietician/ask1_02.aspx

Ideally, the best way to go is completely “Salt Free.” Instead of mimicking the taste of sodium with salt substitutes, start experimenting with other more flavorful herbs and spices to add zest to your meals. Try fresh garlic or garlic powder, lemon juice, flavored vinegar, salt-free herb blends, cumin, nutmeg, cinnamon, fresh ground pepper, tarragon, oregano and many others to unleash the powerful flavors these salt-free herbs and spices have to offer.

Remember that a 2 gram sodium restriction includes the total sodium in your day – this includes the foods that you eat, not just the seasoning that you add. Be cautious of nutrition labels and keep foods under 140 mg or less which is considered a “low sodium food”.

Another reason for our poor eating habits is lack of time.  Everyone seems rushed with no time to be considering sodium, saturated fat or sugar content.  We just need something fast – but fast doesn’t have to mean unhealthy.

“Sometimes cooking takes a lot of time in our life, but we got some good news for you. We gathered an excellent list of cooking recipes which are easy to prepare. There are categories of receipts like Breakfast, Salad Entrees, Soups, Fish, Chicken and Turkey, Lean Meat, Vegetarian Entrees, Side Salad/Dressings, Side Vegetables, and Desserts. All easy healthy foods so you don’t even need to think about what to cook tonight!”

[Update: Try this lifehack article for an updated List of 100 healthy recipes that you can learn in 15 minutes
I edited the list so if you want the complete story click on this link: http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifehack/over-100-quick-and-easy-healthy-foods.html

Or…for great and flavorful healthy food ideas go directly to Recipesia dot com.  http://www.recipesia.com/

Breakfast

Grape Nuts Breakfast Bars

Foolproof Scrambled Eggs

Guacamole Omelet

Huevos Rancheros

Mission Fritada With Wine Syrup

Nest Eggs

Prickly Pear Eggs

Santa Fe Eggs

Scrambled Eggs With Shrimp And Sherry

Southwestern Eggs

Salad Entrees

Egg Jigglers

Easter Egg Salad

Minted Pea Salad

Dazzling Easter Eggs

Easter Bunny Salad

Easter Bunny Salad

Lemon Marshmallow Fluff

Lemon Lime Jell O Salad

Peach Jell O Salad

Pina Colada Salad

Soups

Polish Easter Soup

Sicilian Easter Soup

Majeiritsa (easter Lamb Soup)

Cream Of Mango Soup

Iced Papaya Soup

Raspberry Fuchsia Soup

Strawberry Peach Soup

Sweet Red Pepper And Crab Bisque

Creamed Tomato Bisque

Fish

Anchorage Baked Salmon

Cajun Style Baked Fish

Ranch Fish Fillets

Scalloped Salmon

Codfish Cakes

Colorado Deep Fry Fish Batter

Country Fried Catfish

Crispy Oven Fried Fish

Door County Fish Boil

Chicken and Turkey

Grilling

Grilling

Chicken With White Wine And Mushrooms

Cinnamon Garlic Roast Chicken

Roasted Chicken Oreganato

Lemon Chicken

Herbed Chicken Piccata

Barbecued Bundles

Barbecued Chicken

Lean Meat

Till We Meat Again

Meat Balls

Canadian Meat Pie

Meat Loaf Ricotta

Nalley Chili Meat Loaf

Stuffed Meat Loaf

Tropical Meat Loaf

Garden Meat Loaf

Italian Stuffed Meat Loaf

Mom’s Meat Loaf

Vegetarian Entrees

All Bean Chili

Deep Fried Masa Turnovers With Cheese

Green Chile Avocado Enchiladas

African Style Vegetarian Stew

Aztec Platter

Bean And Mushroom Stroganoff

Black Eyed Pea And Vegetable Stew

Bulghur Wheat “sausage” Patties

Carrot Rice Nut Burger

Cheese And Nut Loaf

Chile And Cheese Enchiladas

Side Salad/Dressings

Chinese Cabbage Salad

Creamy Romaine Salad – non-dairy

Cucumber, Seaweed Salad

Fresh Minted Garbanzo Salad

Great Antipasti Salad

Romaine & Avocado Salad

Tomato Dandelion Salad

Side Vegetables

Asian Mushroom Sauté

Calabacitas – Mexican flavored vegetable side dish

Cranberry Sauce

Healthy Mashed Sweet Potatoes – no dairy

Marinated Beets

Mediterranean Collard Greens

Mediterranean Kale

Mediterranean Spinach

Desserts

Almond Filled Cheesecake

Bailey’s Chocolate Mousse Cheesecake

Apple Normandy Cheesecake

Applesauce Cheesecake

Autumn Cheesecake

Avocado Cheesecake

Bailey’s Irish Cream Cheesecake

Banana Cream Cheesecake

Banana Peanut Cheesecake

Apricot Cheesecake

Baklava Cheesecake

Got some ideas for healthier living?  We’d like to hear them.  Please add your comments here or write to me directly bob@baronson.org if you have a blog idea or if you’d like to submit a guest blog.  Stay tuned for more on living healthy.  One way of solving the transplantable organ shortage is by reducing the demand.  By living healthy you do just that.

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bobBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

Communicating With Someone With an Eating Disorder


My last blog dealt with the illness of Anorexia, but knowing the illness is not enough.  Communication is critically important and the person who suffers from eating disorders may be overly sensitive to words and actions.  This post should be of some help but I urge you to do further research to determine how you should deal with your specific situation.

Bob Aronson

Rules of Support…What to say and what not to say

Support is, at times, hard to give a person living with an eating disorder. He or she will most likely push you away when you try to help them, and they will isolate themselves as much as they can, as well as abuse things like laxatives, ipecac, and diuretics. They will sneak in exercising and hide food when you give it to them, but don’t let this discourage or infuriate you. Remember that the eating disorder that he or she has lived with is like an identity to them. Imagine one day waking up in a totally new place. A new house, job, life, planet, etc., with everything that you once knew so well now gone. That is what someone with an eating disorder encounters once they start the road to recovery. With an eating disorder, you become so use to the starving and rituals involved with anorexia, and the immediate relief and high you get from purging, that it is incredibly hard to just totally stop.

In the beginning, the person with the eating disorder will most likely deny that they even have a problem. Those with anorexia especially have a high denial rate because they cannot see how they really look, and instead only see themselves as obese failures. Most say they are “too fat” to be anorexic, and many have been regarded as the “perfect” children so they are too afraid to admit to themselves that there are actual problems. No matter what eating disorder, those with them feel they are not worth help, and their heads will tell them that they shouldn’t waste other people’s time when they are such “failures” anyways.

Knowing these things, never forget that recovery is a long road full of speed bumps and potholes. In recovery we tend to turn cold and unresponsive, and even shove and push those away from us, but don’t think that that doesn’t mean that we don’t want help. Deep down inside those suffering is a wish to truly be free from this hell. By pushing you away, those with an eating disorder are only isolating themselves more because they believe that they are not worthy or deserving of love/help.

Your support will be one of the most important things in that person’s recovery. Remember that getting angry or frustrated the person, or yelling at them, will only reinforce how much trouble and how much of a failure the person already feels, which always leads to the eating disorder worsening. Always have open ears and always calmly talk things, but don’t be fake (we can detect it like little radars). Most importantly, NEVER GIVE UP on the person.

What to do and what not to do

Do NOT comment on appearance. If you make comments such as, “Oh, you look so much healthier!”, the person with an eating disorder will twist that around and interpretate it as meaning that they have gained weight and are now “fat”. Also, don’t make this kind of comment either – “Wow, you are so thin! I wish I had your willpower.” The person will take that as a compliment and reinforce their weight loss.

Do NOT blame the person for what is going on. As I have commented before, if you yell, scream, fight, or blame the person for their eating disorder or for making your life “hell”, this will only reinforce how worthless they already feel and thus will trigger the eating disorder even more.

Do NOT make mealtimes a force feeding frenzy. Recovery is a long and slow process, and if you cram meal after meal down a person’s throat, you will only make them feel even more guilty and upset which leads to purging. SLOW is the key word. Work on eating snacks calmly and then move up to meals if it helps (this can go for all eating disorders, not just anorexia). Mealtimes should be as comfortable and friendly as possible so that the person doesn’t hate eating as much as possible.

DO listen and try to understand. Drawings, paintings, and poetry can help a great deal when those suffering can’t express themselves through talking.

DO remind and tell the person that they are not the only one fighting an eating disorder.

Do NOT harp on them about their eating behaviors, such as asking, “Are you going to puke that up?”, or, “Have you eaten anything today? What’d you have?” This only makes the person feel more ashamed (remember, someone with an eating disorder honestly believes that they don’t deserve to eat and they feel guilty every time they do).

Do NOT say things like, “I wish I could be anorexic, then I could be thin like you.” So many people think eating disorders are glamorous and that they can be flipped on and off like a light switch. But, go and ask anyone suffering, and they’ll tell you they wouldn’t wish this on their greatest enemies, so don’t treat this problem like a game instead of a deadly disorder.

DO understand that the person with an eating disorder is not out for attention or pity. We didn’t ask for this disorder to happen, nor did we want it to happen.

Do NOT make comments like, “You have four months to stop puring/to gain weight or else you are going to the hospital.” You cannot put a time limit on recovery and this will only panic the person with an eating disorder. Tell that to a person will only cause them to lie to you about their stages of recovery, not encourage them to “speed up” the recovery process .http://www.angelfire.com/bc/peacelovehope/rules.html

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

 Espanol

Bob Aronson Newheart de Bob es un receptor de trasplante cardiaco 2007, el fundador de Facebook, casi 2.500 Iniciativa miembro de Trasplante de Órganos y el autor de la mayoría de los blogs de donación / trasplante.

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor vea nuestro video “Gracias desde el fondo de mi corazón Donante” en http://www.organti.org Este video fue producido para promover la donación de órganos por lo que es libre y no se necesita permiso para su uso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisione

Anorexia — A Mental Health Issue That Can Kill You


Since I began writing this blog nearly six years ago, one issue continues to present itself and that is that much of the need for transplantable organs is avoidable.  Avoidable  in the sense that our living and eating habits are responsible to a great degree for the state of our health.

There will never be enough donated organs to meet the demand.  I arrived at that conclusion after nearly six years of researching the subject and 170 blogs. It is four decades since the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA) was passed, millions of dollars and even more millions of volunteer hours have been spent to promote organ donation, yet fewer than 40 percent of Americans are organ donors.

The approach failed because it was one-sided.  If we had simultaneously spent  as much time, energy and money on getting us all to live healthier lives we could have cut the demand for human organs considerably.  As the old comic strip cartoon character Pogo said, ”We have met the enemy and he is us.”  It is not just that we don’t take very good care of ourselves, we seem to make every effort to go out of our way to abuse our bodies and kill our organs.

If we did just three things we could probably cut the need for organs in half.  1) exercise regularly, 2) be very careful about what we consume (food, alcohol, tobacco and drugs), 3) paid more attention to mental health issues.

The first two, exercise and consumption are obvious but point number three is rarely given any consideration.  Mental health and organ damage are very closely related.

According to U.S. News and World Report, http://tinyurl.com/7djepm2   research paints a compelling argument on the link between the two. Adults with serious mental illness like schizophrenia die about 25 years earlier than the general population, according to a 2007 report from the National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors. They’re 3.4 times more likely to die of heart disease or diabetes, 3.8 times more likely to die in an accident, 5 times more likely to die of respiratory ailments, and 6.6 times more likely to die of pneumonia or flu, found the team led by Joseph Parks, director of the Missouri Institute of Mental Health.

Why? They often get little exercise, leading to obesity and hiking the odds of diabetes and heart disease. They’re also more likely than others to smoke and have alcohol and drug-abuse problems. It’s common for their medical needs to slip through the cracks, too, because they often cannot adequately advocate for their own health according to U.S.News.

An often ignored fact is this; eating disorders have a higher death rate than any other psychiatric disorder (including depression and schizophrenia).

How serious the consequences are depends greatly upon how early an eating disorder is identified and treated. With help, the effects of an eating disorder can be treated; however, if an eating disorder is left untreated for years, some of the effects are irreversible and life-threatening.

When an eating disorder is successfully treated, the body can heal and return to normal. Sometimes, however, the eating disorder has continued for so many years that there is too much damage for a full recovery to occur. A person may have to live with a weak heart or kidney for the rest of her life. A woman may be unable to conceive because her reproductive system cannot function properly.

Eating disorders include Anorexia and Bulimia and we will be writing more about the disorders in the not too distant future but this blog will concentrate only on Anorexia.  A disease that is common, and can kill.  First, though, let’s define Anorexia. http://tinyurl.com/nkausxh

Anorexia nervosa is a complex eating disorder with three key features:

  • refusal to maintain a healthy body weight
  • an intense fear of gaining weight
  • a distorted body image

Because of your dread of becoming fat or disgusted with how your body looks, eating and mealtimes may be very stressful. And yet, what you can and can’t eat is practically all you can think about.

Thoughts about dieting, food, and your body may take up most of your day—leaving little time for friends, family, and other activities you used to enjoy. Life becomes a relentless pursuit of thinness and going to extremes to lose weight.

But no matter how skinny you become, it’s never enough.

While people with anorexia often deny having a problem, the truth is that anorexia is a serious and potentially deadly eating disorder. Fortunately, recovery is possible. With proper treatment and support, you or someone you care about can break anorexia’s self-destructive pattern and regain health and self-confidence.

There are two types of anorexia. In the restricting type of anorexia, weight loss is achieved by restricting calories (following drastic diets, fasting, and exercising to excess). In the purging type of anorexia, weight loss is achieved by vomiting or using laxatives and diuretics.  This chart gives a pretty good idea of how Anorexia, a mental health disease, affects the physical health of the person involved.  

Anorexia is Not About Food!

if you suffer from Anorexia or any eating disorder you may not belive it but food and weight are not the real issues. They are symptoms of much deeper and more complicated and usually related to things like depression, loneliness, insecurity, pressure to be perfect, or feeling out of control. Things that no amount of dieting or weight loss can cure.

Image of body parts affected by anorexia

http://tinyurl.com/p6xbkcm (for graphic and more)

Anorexia nervosa has a multitude of medical complications ranging from mild to severe. In fact, 5-20% of anorexics die, usually from complications associated with self-starvation, such as: heart, kidney, or multiple organ failure, or illnesses like pneumonia, which may be due to an inability to fight infection—all due to the dangers of anorexia.

  • Cardiac Problems—irregular heartbeat
  • Gastrointestinal disorders—risk of internal bleeding, ulcers, gastritis, and constipation
  • Amenorrhea—due to decreased estrogen production, which causes females to cease ovulation and menstruation
  • Anemia—a blood disorder characterized by either a decrease in the number of red cells, or a reduction in hemoglobin; the body’s ability to carry oxygen from the lungs to its tissues is reduced; often caused by an iron deficiency
  • binging—an effect of starvation
  • bruising
  • decreased testicular function in men—some studies reveal a decrease in testosterone and certain male hormones
  • dental decay and discoloration
  • depressed immune system
  • dizziness
  • dry skin; brittle hair and nails
  • edema—water retention, most commonly in the ankles and feet
  • endocrine abnormalities
  • fainting
  • high cholesterol—an effect of starvation, not necessarily warranting a low cholesterol diet
  • hyperactivity
  • hypoglycemia
  • increased risk of osteoporosis—bones lose density and fracture easily
  • insomnia
  • ketosis—the excessive accumulation of ketone bodies in the blood and urine, which is indicative of the body digesting its fat stores as a sole source of energy
  • kidney damage/failure—usually due to dehydration; many be worsened by the use of diuretics
  • lanugo—the growth of fine hair on the body, which is the body’s attempt to keep itself warm when fat stores are depleted
  • liver damage—a condition that is usually irreparable
  • loss of hair on the head
  • low blood pressure
  • low body temperature—causes anorexics to feel cold
  • muscle cramps and weakness—usually due to electrolyte imbalances
  • pancreatitis—the painful swelling of the pancreas evidenced by severe abdominal pain, distention, and fever
  • sensitivity to light and sound
  • yellow skin—also called hypercarotinemia

http://www.bulimia.com/client/client_pages/evolving_treatments_anorexia.cfm

How are eating disorders treated?

Adequate nutrition, reducing excessive exercise, and stop-ping purging behaviors are the foundations of treatment. Specific forms of psychotherapy, or talk therapy, and medication are effective for many eating disorders. However, in more chronic cases, specific treatments have not yet been identified. Treatment plans often are tailored to individual needs and may include one or more of the following:

  • Individual, group, and/or family psychotherapy
  • Medical care and monitoring
  • Nutritional counseling
  • Medications.

Some patients may also need to be hospitalized to treat problems caused by mal-nutrition or to ensure they eat enough if they are very underweight.

Treating anorexia nervosa

Treating anorexia nervosa involves three components:

  • Restoring the person to a healthy weight
  • Treating the psychological issues related to the eating disorder
  • Reducing or eliminating behaviors or thoughts that lead to insufficient eating and preventing relapse.

Some research suggests that the use of medications, such as antidepressants, antipsychotics, or mood stabilizers, may be modestly effective in treating patients with anorexia nervosa. These medications may help resolve mood and anxiety symptoms that often occur along with anorexia nervosa. It is not clear whether antidepressants can prevent some weight-restored patients with anorexia nervosa from relapsing.10 Although research is still ongoing, no medication yet has shown to be effective in helping someone gain weight to reach a normal level.11

Different forms of psychotherapy, including individual, group, and family-based, can help address the psychological reasons for the illness. In a therapy called the Maudsley approach, parents of adolescents with anorexia nervosa assume responsibility for feeding their child. This approach appears to be very effective in helping people gain weight and improve eating habits and moods.12,13 Shown to be effective in case studies and clinical trials,14 the Maudsley approach is discussed in some guidelines and studies for treating eating disorders in younger, non-chronic patients.11,12,15-18

Other research has found that a combined approach of medical attention and supportive psychotherapy designed specifically for anorexia nervosa patients is more effective than psychotherapy alone.19 The effectiveness of a treatment depends on the person involved and his or her situation. Unfortunately, no specific psychotherapy appears to be consistently effective for treating adults with anorexia nervosa.20 However, research into new treatment and prevention approaches is showing some promise. One study suggests that an online intervention program may prevent some at-risk women from developing an eating disorder.21 Also, specialized treatment of anorexia nervosa may help reduce the risk of death.22

For more information on eating disorders and treatment here are a few links:

http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/treatment

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/eating-disorder-treatment/MY00794

http://www.tree.com/health/eating-disorders-anorexia-health-effects.aspx

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

A Day in the Life of a Cystic Fibrosis Patient


Bob Aronson, the Author of most of these posts, does not  have CF.  He suffers from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), a distant cousin of CF but related in the sense that he can identify with the struggle to breathe.  He is also a 2007 heart transplant recipient)

A few days ago I posted a blog on Cystic Fibrosis that has attracted a great deal of attention but my blog didn’t do justice to the heroic efforts these patients make every day just so that they can function.  Imagine if you can, getting up every day experiencing great difficulty breathing and then being required to exercise in order to clear your lungs…exercise that requires beating on your chest to loosen the mucus that restricts their ability to function.  Some people must physically beat on their own chests while others, if they can afford it, get a machine to do it for them, sometimes for up to an hour.

I found this account on the internet and rather than re-write it and lift excerpts I choose to publish the entire account unedited.    Your comments are welcome.

My Version of Normal

Lauren Beyenhof, Yahoo! Contributor Network

 http://tinyurl.com/946gllo

Diagnosed with cystic fibrosis at birth, I was not expected to celebrate my tenth birthday. Today, thanks to the hard work of many doctors and researchers, new drug therapies and the support of a wonderful family, I am living and breathing in my late twenties. A day in my life is somewhat routine with room for adjustments as needed.

The first thing I do every morning upon waking is cough. I cough because the thick, sticky mucus so characteristic of cystic fibrosis, has lodged itself in my airways during the night. Some mornings it only takes five minutes to clear my lungs of sputum. Cystic fibrosis patients like me have affectionately dubbed these secretions “lung oysters.”

My first round of coughing complete, I move on to a more dramatic approach to airway clearance. I stumble downstairs to the refrigerator where I keep one of my most effective medications. Pulmozyme, or DNase, is a mucolytic developed by Genetech. When inhaled as a mist via nebulizer, it works in my lungs to cut apart the bacteria that thrive there. Pulmozyme is just one of the inhaled medications I need to open up my airways to their fullest. A bronchodilator in the form of a metered dose inhaler (MDI) goes a long way to help with that. Later in the day, I may need that bronchodilator again if I feel my chest becoming tight.

The highlight of my morning routine is my high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) vest. It looks like a life vest. On the front of the vest are two hoses that attach to an air compressor. As the vest fills with air and begins to vibrate, the controls on the compressor allow me to set the frequency, pressure and length of time for the vibration therapy. I wear the vest for a minimum of 20 minutes on days when I feel well and up to an hour when I’m struggling with chest congestion.

After the vest, it’s finally time for breakfast. I am a pancreatic insufficient CF patient, which means that my pancreas doesn’t secrete the enzymes I need to absorb the energy and nutrients from my food. To compensate for that I take enzyme supplements. My breakfast is usually on the order of 900 calories or more and typically includes some fruit, milk and some sort of complex carbohydrates like muffins or cereal.

Breakfast time is hardly complete without vitamin and mineral supplements to replace those I cannot absorb from food. Calcium, magnesium and a multivitamin of the fat-soluble vitamins A, B, D, E and K are swallowed together to save time. I learned long ago how to swallow multiple pills at a time.

Once I’ve taken my vitamins, I get ready for my day. My form of cystic fibrosis has progressed to the point that I have moderate loss of lung function. This keeps me from working a 40-hour week like I used to when I was younger. Three days a week, I go in to work where I enjoy a part-time schedule as an environmental scientist. My employer is very understanding of my needs for managing CF and has given me a reasonably flexible schedule. Some days I’m even able to work from home.

At lunch time I eat another calorie-laden meal, complete with enzymes. I try to eat almost the same thing every day, because I view food as fuel. Sandwiches (yes, plural on a single day), yogurt, pretzels, juice and a soda are my main fare. My lunch break is another chance for me to do some airway clearance and take my MDI to keep my airways open. I keep a small, hand-held nebulizer/compressor in my desk drawer along with a small stash of medications just in case.

After work I come home, take a quick cat-nap on the couch and prepare dinner. Dinner time is where I really shine! I love to cook and my husband loves it when I have a meal ready to go when he walks through the door. I prepare two plates every night. One for me, which has a double helping of almost everything and one for him, a lighter version of the evening’s food selection. When it comes to food at our house, grocery shopping can be difficult since I need high-calorie foods, and my husband, who watches his weight in a manner completely different from mine, likes low-fat or non-fat items.

The dinner dishes having been cleared, my husband and I relax and enjoy the evening together. Usually we watch a bit of television or watch a Netflix movie together. By the time 8:30 p.m. rolls around it’s time for me to once again begin a series of airway clearance and nebulizer medications. I put on the vibrating vest and set it to a pressure that allows me to move relative freely. During this time I lift hand weights and do a lot of stretching to build muscles. Since muscle weighs more than fat, it is important that I have enough of both to give my body the energy it needs not only to sustain me throughout the day’s activities, but to help fight off any flare-ups of lung infections.

Half an hour later, my treatments are complete and I spend a half hour playing with my pet rabbit. Initially we were concerned that an indoor animal would be a problem for my allergies. Our worries turned out to be unfounded. The rabbit only sheds a few times a year, and as long as I keep his cage and litter box neat, there’s no odor. Having a pet is a great source of therapy for me, especially when I’m home sick.

I try to get to bed at the same time every night. Cystic fibrosis patients are encouraged to get at least 10 hours of sleep. I usually manage to get between 8 and 9 hours. After such a full day of taking care of myself, doing my share around the house and making sure my husband is happy, a good night’s sleep is not only much needed, it’s much welcomed.

Aside from all the medications and airway clearance treatments, a day in my life as a cystic fibrosis patient really isn’t that different from anyone else’s day. I just have to be more careful about how I budget my time and my energy so that I can be as normal as possible and enjoy the highest quality of life this world has to offer.

Suggested resources

Cystic Fibrosis is a terrible disease and while progress is being made in treating it, lifespans for its victims are still relatively short. If you’d like to help fund research or offer assistance in other ways contact the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation http://www.cff.org/GetInvolved/ManyWaysToGive/MakeADonation/

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Can Cellular Memory Cause Transplant Recipients to Act Like Their Donors?


I have been writing these blogs for almost five years.  All of them are related to organ and tissue transplants and they range from how alcohol and drugs affect your organs to eating disorders, post transplant depression, mandatory donation and the Vice President Cheney Heart Transplant.  None of them, though, have gotten anywhere near the response of the posts I’ve written about Cellular memory, the theory that certain cells in the body have memories of their own and that when transplanted into another person become the new person’s memories as well.

Personally I don’t  put much stock in the claims of cellular memory but a  lot of people do so who am I to say they are wrong especially when I get so many requests for more information on the subject … so here’s the latest I could dig up.

While many scientists will tell you that cellular memory is impossible there really isn’t very much science on the subject.  Studies have been small and rare so while there is a lot of scientific doubt there is no absolute proof that the phenomenon does not exist.

Most doctors attribute the sometimes seismic personality changes after a transplant to radical health improvements, heavy doses of anesthesia and anti-rejection medications and psychological factors.

Like others University of Arizona psychologist Gary Schwartz has little real evidence to back up his theory that since every cell in the body contains a complete set of genetic material, transplant patients inherit DNA from their donors that determines, in part, how a person thinks, behaves and even eats. “Hearts can have memory, as brains do,” says Schwartz. Most doctors, however, say that’s the stuff of the Sci-Fi Channel and note that Schwartz based his theory on a study of just 10 transplant patients. “There is no evidence of clinical findings to suggest that [cellular memory exists],” says Dr. Tracy Stevens, medical director of the cardiac transplant program at St. Luke’s Hospital in Kansas City, Mo. You can read more here http://www.people.com/people/archive/article/0,,20147267,00.html

While medical and other scientific researchers will tell you that a truly scientific study would take years among perhaps hundreds of people there are some unexplainable individual cases.  One of which is the story of Claire Sylvia who got a heart and lung transplant in the 1970s from an eighteen year old male who had died in a  motorcycle accident.  Ms. Sylvia knew oone of this information but claimed upon awakening that she had a new and intense craving for beer, chicken nuggets, and green peppers, all food she didn’t enjoy prior to the surgery. A change in food preferences is probably the most noted in heart transplant patients. Sylvia wrote a book about her experiences after learning the identity of her donor called A Change of Hear.  You can watch her video here  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIDwRnBcrGw

And…if the Claire Sylvia story is not enough, here is yet another about a young woman, Julie Shambra in England  who after suffering from diabetes for many years got a life saving transplant from a young man that changed her life and many of her habits and tastes. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NVVk3zAz8Qo&feature=related

The most stunning example of cellular memory was found in an eight year old girl who received the heart of a ten year old girl. The recipient was plagued after surgery with vivid nightmares about an attacker and a girl being murdered. After being brought to a psychiatrist her nightmares proved to be so vivid and real that the psychiatrist believed them to be genuine memories. As it turns out the ten year old whose heart she had just received was murdered and due to the recipients violent reoccurring dreams she was able to describe the events of that horrible encounter and the murderer so well that police soon apprehended, arrested, and convicted the killer.  Unfortunately I have been unable to find out where or when this happened so there is no real proof that the story is anything more than an urban myth.

But then there are these stories:

Bill Wohl was a hard-driving self-described type A executive until cardiac disease nearly killed him in 2000. A heart transplant at the University of Arizona medical center saved his life—and transformed it in ways he could never have imagined. Weeks after his operation, Wohl, now 58, heard a song on the radio by the British vocalist Sade. “I just started crying and rocking,” he recalls. Odd, since before the surgery, Wohl hadn’t heard of Sade and was not the type to mist up over a torch song. Later he contacted the family of organ donor Michael Brady, the 36-year-old Hollywood stuntman whose heart he had received, and made an intriguing discovery. Sade was one of Brady’s favorite singers. “It was,” says Wohl, “really, really freaky.”

And then there is Paul Oldam, a corporate executive in a Milwaukee law firm, received the heart of a 14-year-old boy who had been killed in a truck accident in 1993. On Oldam’s first post-surgery shopping trip, his wife, Peggy, was taken aback when he wandered into the candy aisle and started loading the basket with Snickers bars. “He never liked candy before that,” Peggy says other husband, now 70. Bill also became an avid outdoorsman, given to kayaking, cross-country skiing and cycling 25 miles at a stretch. “I wouldn’t be surprised,” says Peggy, 69, “if he wanted to try parachuting next year.”

How Cellular Memory Might Work

It is thought that cellular memory might be possible since the discovery that neuropeptides exist not only in the brain as once thought but in all the tissues of the body. These neuropeptides are a way for the brain to “speak” to other bodily organs and for the organs to rely information back. However it is unknown if these newly found circuits could indeed store memories as the brain does in different organs. Due to the amount of peptides in the heart this organ is seen to have special potential in the study of this phenomena. However many answers still remain. Why don’t all transplant recipients have these experiences? It’s been theorized this may be due to the fact not all of them are in tune with their body as some other individuals may be. Perhaps the explanation lies with the sensitivity of the individual.

According to a story in Hub Pages which is not exactly a respected medical journal there are three possible explanations for cellular memory http://theophanes.hubpages.com/hub/Cellular-Memories-in-Organ-Transplant-Recipients

  • The Hospital Grapevine Theory: The hospital grapevine theory is the simplest alternate explanation, stating that patients may be influenced due to information they hear from nurses talking to each other or their surgeons while they are under anesthesia. Although it’s forbidden to tell a transplant recipients the identity of the donor or any personal information there’s no such rule that prevents hospital staff from talking amongst themselves. Could all these coincidences be a placebo effect given to the highly suggestible?
  • The Quantum Theory: this theory claims that the answers may lie in a world we are as of yet are very ill-equipped to prove, in the wonderfully strange world of quantum mechanics. Quantum mechanics tries to explain mathematically events that occur with atoms and the particles which may make up atoms. This is world where regular physics comes to die and can be used loosely to explain virtually anything that can’t be explained otherwise. It’s tempting but I’ll leave this one up to the mathematicians to toy with. As of yet I haven’t heard of any of them proposing this theory, it seems to be something thrown out there by laymen.
  • The Drug Theory: It is the body’s duty to protect itself from foreign objects and that is generally what it does when it receives organs that weren’t grown in it from conception. This is why patients have to receive immunosuppressant drugs to stop their own bodies from attacking the new organ. There have only been a small handful of cases of people who have lived without these drugs, and they have done so on their own against the advice of doctors. this theory states that these drugs can be the cause of the changes in personality. Perhaps in some strange way these drugs can be psychoactive as well as immunosuppressive. This theory probably chalks up the specific nature of the said changes in personality to coincidence.

There is no definitive evidence one way or another that cellular memory exists.  I can only speak for myself but I had a heart transplant almost five years ago and have absolutely no change in my personality or lifestyle at all.  I am more appreciative of life than ever before but I think that might be true of anyone who was dying and had their life saved by a total stranger.

So we’ll close with the now well-known line, “We report… you decide.

Bob Aronson is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s 1700 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the writer of these donation/transplantation blogs on Bob’s Newheart.  

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

 Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have a PowerPoint slide show for your use free and for use without permission.  Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions.  This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

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