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Will Power — It Works As Well On Alcoholism As It Does On Diahrrea


By Bob Aronson

sobriety for opener

Alcohol abuse, especially outright alcoholism is a leading cause of the organ shortage because of its destructive effect on the heart, pancreas, liver, kidneys, reproductive organs and stomach. There are over 123,000 people waiting for organ transplants in the U.S. and with only about 30,000 transplants a year, many on that list will die.

As a former drinker, a heart transplant recipient and the author of most of these blogs, I am always intensely interested in stories or postings about alcohol and drug abuse, so I actively seek the latest information about those subjects.

In that light, I was surfing the internet recently when I came across a group discussion of the issue. What caught my attention was this statement, “If you make the decision to start drinking you can make the decision to stop. Just say, NO, I’m not going to drink anymore, then pray for sobriety and it will come.”

When I saw that my immediate reaction was that the writer was unaware of what it’s like to be an addict and the total misery in which the alcoholic lives. It is a life no one would wish on their worst enemy. It is a life no one would live if they had a clear choice to get out of it. I wish it was so simple as to just, “quit.” or say, “NO,” but more on that, later.

***(A note to the reader. Throughout this blog I refer to the alcoholic as “he” for convenience. Please read it as he/she or him/her because everything I relate here applies to both genders. Also, I can only relate to the disease as a male. Women have many of the same experiences as men, but many more that are totally different. In many ways women suffer even more than their male counterparts)

I am writing this in my role as a recovering alcoholic of some 34 years. I have not had a drink of alcohol in all that time, I am not drinking today and I don’t plan to tomorrow, but I live every moment of every day with the knowledge that I am just one drink away from returning to  the greatest misery man can inflict on himself whether physically, emotionally or both.

This is not one of those “tell-all confessions.” Since the birth of this blog in 2007 I’ve received dozens of requests for more information on alcoholism, but not for the usual fare, many of our readers want to know what it’s like to be an alcoholic. This is an attempt to answer that question, to explain the agony of alcoholism and to help you recognize that the alcoholic can’t “just quit.” I hope it offers some insight into the alcoholic mind and answers at least a few questions you may have about what it’s like to be a drunk.

Those who say, “Just quit,” or, “just say no” have no idea what it’s like to be a full-blown, full-time, uncontrollablejust say no drunk. If it was a matter of choice, a matter of will power, a matter over which alcoholics had control they would not choose to live that way. It is a life of absolute misery, dishonesty and risk. Your best friend and worst enemy is the bottle, it totally controls your life. Every minute of your existence revolves around making sure you have access to alcohol. If you have to choose between eating and drinking, you’ll drink. If you have to choose between bleeding to death and drinking, you’ll choose bleeding and if you have to choose between those you love and alcohol, you will choose alcohol and all the while knowing it’s wrong — totally and absolutely wrong. Worse yet, as you continue to choose alcohol over what’s right, that cloud of oppressive guilt that follows you around  will tighten its stranglehold forcing you to consume more in another feeble attempt to stop the agony.

One other point about “If you can choose to drink, you can choose to stop.” The initial choice to drink is usually made while sober and for many, it is the last sober choice they make. Once the brain is supersaturated with alcohol, how do you get it to make a rational, logical choice? You can’t. The only time choosing to stop drinking might work is if you choose to get HELP to stop drinking, because you cannot do it alone. You must, as the AA Big Book says, realize and admit that you are powerless over alcohol and your life has become unmanageable. Only when you are willing to put your life in the hands of others (usually highly qualified addiction professionals) do you stand a chance of getting it back.

alcoholism definitionI stopped to read the post and comments I mentioned earlier because I have an interest in the subject. Addiction runs in my family. I was a practicing alcoholic for a long time and the practice paid off, I became a perfect drunk. It started when I was a teen who thought a weekend of beer consumption was normal behavior. I realized at that early age that while others could have a can of beer or two and then quit, I couldn’t. I always drank until drunk (sometimes unconscious) or until we ran out of alcohol whichever came first.

My early adulthood was not unlike most other people, I was young, struggling to pay the bills and unable to afford alcohol so my drinking problem wasn’t all that obvious. I knew, though, that anytime alcoholic beverages were available my old pattern continued. Once I started drinking I couldn’t stop. As time went on and there was a little more money, I drank more. At first it was just In the evening and on weekends but before long I was following my father’s habit of having a little “bump” upon arising each day. That progressed to several “bumps” and finally arriving at work drunk and staying that way. I was not a bar fly, I did most of my drinking privately and…I was good at hiding it. From jobs in broadcast journalism to serving as a Minnesota Governor’s Communications Director and then back to broadcast journalism I was a full-blown alcoholic and almost no one knew it. I was under the influence of alcohol even when I was on the air several hours a day and yet, no one ever mentioned it.  Not then and not since. .

I had tried a hundred times to quit drinking and each time I did it with great resolve, but my best efforts never lasted longer than a week  or two before I was back to my old habits. Finally, though, I hit bottom. It was 10 o’clock  in the morning and I had already consumed nearly a quart of vodka and hadn’t eaten in days. I was very sick. Sicker than I had ever been before. While my head was nearly in the toilet bowl I made the decision to get help. I crawled to the phone, found the yellow pages and located a treatment center a couple of miles from my home. I then called my brother, told him what I wanted to do and asked him to drive me there.

It was about noon on Saturday July 17, 1982 and my blood alcohol was 3 times the legal limit. I was so wracked with guilt and pain and so sick I just wanted someone to help me feel good again. I was, “sick and tired of being sick and tired.”

The Mounds Park hospital and treatment center in St. Paul, Minnesota no longer exists but they were the right people in the right place at the right time. I have not had a drink since, but I could not have done it alone. “So,” you ask, “Why are you writing this?” I’m doing so because I’m hoping to bring some understanding to the issue.

The first few days in treatment were awful. When I wasn’t in the bathroom emptying my stomach, I spent my time trying to think of a way to get out of there and get a drink, but the papers I had signed had me in voluntary lockdown. Saturday, Sunday and Monday were probably the most tortured moments of my life. I was so sick I prayed for death. Even though they gave me tranquilizers this “purging” period was awful. I later learned that withdrawal from alcohol addiction is among the worst and can be deadly. As I dried out I never left my room, talked to none of the other patients, didn’t eat and drank what seemed to be gallons of water and even that wouldn’t stay down. Anyone who has ever had a hangover, has experienced just a smidgen of what alcohol withdrawal is like for the person who consumes it by the quart or liter every day of his life. It is why the alcoholic needs some “hair of the dog that bit you” in the morning. it’s the perfect way to cure a hangover. If you never stop drinking you never have a hangover. Well — almost.

facts abot deathI’m sure there are many who have been heavy drinkers, made the decision to quit and did. Others counted on God’s intervention and it worked, but for the vast majority of alcoholism sufferers quitting is beyond their ability. That was and is e nature of my condition. I am absolutely convinced that my ability to quit drinking was unrelated to will power. An alcoholism counselor once told me, “If you think will power will work, the next time you have diarrhea, use will power to stop it.” Just the thought of drinking again scares the hell out of me.

So, you might ask how and when you know you are an alcoholic and that’s a great question. In the deep dark recesses of your mind you probably know from that first drunk when you couldn’t stop drinking. The great test of whether there is something amiss is for me quite simple. Most normal, social drinkers can have one or two drinks and quit with no discomfort. I can’t. I know I can’t because I tried it many times. I find it impossible to believe the claims of some who say, “Addiction can be cured.” I will only accept that when they can show me highly supervised, peer reviewed, large group, long term clinical studies that clearly show patients who were cured can drink again and stop after one or two. Anyone or any organizations that claims to have a cure and cannot provide that evidence does not, in my view, have one.

Only others who share my experience will really understand this, but once I have a single drink of alcohol something is triggered in me that is so strong, so incredibly powerful it will cause me to have another and another and another. As the adage goes, “One drink is too much and a thousand are not enough.”

To further the point you might ask, “Well what if you had that drink and then thought real hard about the consequences like, Hey Bob,  you could lose your job, your marriage, everything that is dear to you and wind up in prison for life as well, wouldn’t that stop you?” I guess a rational mind would immediately agree that those considerations would cause you to step back from the bar, but – you must remember the alcoholic mind is not one that is rational. It is driven by a craving so deep and so irrational it will violate every moral and ethical standard you ever had in order to spend more time with its best friend forever, alcohol.

That is not to say the alcoholic has no conscience. Once he has done whatever horrendous thing it was that relieved him of all that he loved he will feel great guilt, depression and sorrow. He will swear to change and to make things right, but when the agony of the hangover (withdrawal) begins he will again turn to the bottle. Does he have a choice to drink or not to drink? Of course, and the alcoholic will vow time and time again to make that choice, to quit drinking and will be incredibly strong in his resolve as long as he is under alcohol’s influence, but the resolve diminishes right along with the influence.

“One more drink,” he says, “will get me back on the road to sobriety,” and he really believes it, but one leads to six and to ten more and then to a repeat of the very behavior that caused all the guilt and there’s only one way to deal with it, more alcohol. It is a powerful drug and while it can cause one to lose his inhibitions (read that “good sense”), it also helps one forget, until you start getting a little sober and then you start all over again.

So you see, the alcoholic knows he has choices and he is willing to make the right one, but he never gets to a point where he feels good enough to make it, unless he is drunk and then even his alcoholic mind knows he has failed again.
drunk in trashAlcoholism is not only the failure to say “no” to the drug, it is also a complete abandonment of all that you know is right —  a behavior change so great as to be unbelievable. The image of an alcoholic that many have is of a foul-smelling bum in dirty clothes who sleeps in a cardboard box in a dark, trash cluttered alley. He is inarticulate, uneducated and offensive. That’s the stereotype, but you know what? That’s only a partial picture.

The rest of the story is quiet and invisible. Every day millions of alcoholics get dressed for work in a stylish suit, and works right alongside you. When I was drinking heavily in the 60’s, 70’s and early 80’s I wore expensive clothing, drove very nice cars and was always presentable and functioning. I anchored TV and radio news shows, hosted a radio talk show and functioned as the press secretary to a state Governor. Few  who knew me would call me a drunk. They might know that I drank a little, but no one would suggest I was an alcoholic.

Like many alcoholics I was pretty good at functioning while inebriated. Even the people with which I worked moshiding a bottlet closely had no idea that I had a secret life. They didn’t know that the double wide briefcase I carried was not full of office work. H, it carried a quart of vodka and a carton of cigarettes. They didn’t know that when I arrived at the office in in the morning, I had already had several drinks or that I had slept in a chair in the clothing I wore the day before. They were unaware that I hid my bottle in the bottom of the men’s room waste basket so whenever I wanted a drink, I just went to the men’s room. They didn’t know that behind the wall mirror in my bathroom at home, I had built a carefully hidden compartment to house my liquor supply. It was constructed while my wife was at work to ensure secrecy. The hidden latch on the wall mirror let it swing open to reveal several bottles sitting on a 2 X 4 shelf. It is where I got my first drink of the day, just a little something to get the hair off of my tongue and get my heart started. Neither friends nor family knew about the sandpit about six blocks from my home. It had a bottle of vodka hidden under the “No trespassing” sign that was only recoverable under the cover of night. There may have been other places as well and the bottles may still be there because I forgot where I put them.

Not all, but many alcoholics suffer from “Blackouts” and I was one of them. I know one fellow traveler who says he missed the “entire Carter Administration.” Blackouts are periods of time that cannot be remembered. They are periods when you can walk, talk and work and remember none of it. There are huge gaps in my memory of those years and it is attempting to recollect them that threatens my sobriety even though they were a long time ago and I might have just fallen asleep. It is not knowing and suspecting the worst that beckons me to have “just one.” The flashing red, white and blue neon “Liquor” signs act as strong magnets that seek to pull my car into their parking lots. I shudder to think of what I might have done that I cannot remember. So far, though, my recovery program and support system have proved to be a stronger force and I fear the liquor sign more than I fear the memories.

liquor sign
When you are a practicing alcoholic you have to spend a whole lot of time making sure you have an uninterrupted supply of alcohol. There’s a lot of planning that goes into being a drunk because our greatest fear is running out of liquor. In Minnesota you can’t buy hard liquor or even strong beer on a Sunday. The liquor stores close at 10 PM on Saturday night and don’t open again until 8 AM on Monday. It is critical that the flow of alcohol not be impeded. An ample supply must be available at all times in a place that is always accessible.

We drunks spend a whole lot of time hiding our addiction, even to the point of having a hidden secret stock that can be consumed privately so when attending a party you can be seen drinking a Coke or Pepsi not liquor, wine or beer. During that time I had many people comment on the fact that I rarely “Drank” and I always agreed.

When I was Anchoring a regional network radio news show five mornings a week, I sat across a desk from my producer. We were almost in each other’s faces every day and I was never sober. One weekend I called her and said, “Christa, I won’t be in on Monday, I’m in treatment.”

“C’mon Bob, is this your idea of a joke? Why are you calling?” She was quite indignant.

“I’m in treatment for alcoholism, Christa,” I said.

“I told you it’s not funny,” she responded.

It took a while to convince her. We had worked across from each other for three years and she never knew I drank even though I was almost never sober. While on the air I labored mightily to keep my enunciation crisp and to be an errorless reader. Face to face I interviewed Governors, captains of industry, super stars of entertainment and men and women of the cloth while at the same time increasing the profitability of not only the liquor companies but also the businesses that make, distribute and sell Certs breath mints, and Binaca breath freshener.

I think I mentioned that it takes a lot of planning to stay drunk and hide the fact that you are. I worked hard at keeping my drinking preferences and practices secret so I made sure I didn’t frequent the same liquor stores too often. I did not want to be seen frequenting bars and nightclubs, so I didn’t go to them. I almost never drank in a bar. I knew the hours of all the liquor stores, their locations and their prices. I even went so far as to deposit my empty liquor bottles in someone else’ trash cans and often not even in my neighborhood. At work I once put an empty vodka bottle in the corporate President’s waste basket.

Sobering up as I mentioned earlier was not easy. It was terrible. When finally the alcohol was out of my system I sobriety quotevowed to go public with my addiction as a means to help me stay sober. Treatment, AA meetings, being public about my problem helped, I’ve not had a drink since a little before noon on that day in ’82.

While I respect those in the scientific community who insist that alcoholism can be cured and that drinkers can choose to stop, I vehemently disagree. I know scores of sufferers just like me. We talk, we relate, we empathize and our stories are nearly identical. Furthermore I have attended hundreds of AA meetings and read scores of books on the subject. They all verify the fact that those who suffer from alcoholism also suffer with feelings of helplessness, depression, resentments and most importantly — overwhelming guilt.

I don’t pretend to be an expert on addiction I am but a single case among millions. My evidence is anecdotal and not scientifically acceptable, but I know that my story and my experiences are repeated thousands if not millions of times every day. I don’t know why people become alcoholics and I don’t understand the psychology behind it I only know it very nearly ruined my life, hurt my friends and family immeasurably and affected the lives of many others as well.

If someone in your family or circle of friends has a problem with alcohol you can try to help, but don’t be surprised if your offers are perceived as threats and you lose your relationship with that person. The alcoholic didn’t drink for you and is not going to stop for you or for anyone else. He will only stop when he hits rock bottom and can no longer stand living that way. Then he will either seek help and keep seeking it for the rest of his life, or return to drinking and alcoholic bliss where unpleasant memories are washed away in a sea of 90 proof alcohol.

Alcoholism is slow suicide. It will kill you one way or another. Either you will succumb to some disease, or you will drink yourself to death. It’s suicide but very slow, very painful and very effective.

My closing thought is the same as the one with which I opened this posting. The life of an alcoholic is a life of misery, shame, guilt and fear. No one, no one, would choose to live like that if choice was really an option.

Below are some resources for Alcoholics,  their families and friends.

Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services AdministrationExternal Link—For information about substance abuse prevention and treatment services:

National Institute on Drug Abuse—For information about other drug problems that often co-exist with alcohol problems: 301-443-1124.

National Institute of Mental Health—For information on problems such as anxiety and depression that can co-exist with alcohol problems: 866-615-6464.

bobBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,200 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of the nearly 300 posts on this site.  You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love. You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes. Then, when registered, tell your family about your decision so there is no confusion when the time comes.

Retirement Means You Quit Working — Not Living.


By Bob Aronson

“Working people have a lot of bad habits, but the worst of these is work.” 

Clarence Darrow

Preparation for old age should begin not later than one’s teens.  A life which is empty of purpose until 65 will not suddenly become filled on retirement.

Dwight L. Moody

Retirement: It’s nice to get out of the rat race, but you have to learn to get along with less cheese.

Gene Perret

 pot gardenHow many times have you heard about “Uncle Joe” who retired from his 50 year long career to a recliner chair and died an unhappy man?   That story is all too common and totally unnecessary.  Take  it from this 75 year old retired guy who is busier and happier than at any other time of my life.

At some point all of us retire from our chosen profession or trade and you should know early on that retirement from a job does not mean retirement from life.  Frankly, retirement should mean new opportunities and exciting new experiences that serve to restore your old enthusiasm for life.  Retirement is not a sentence it is a destination and you can write your own ticket.

Often retirement is not by choice but by necessity.  In my case the need for a heart transplant made it a necessity, but so what?  While everyone knows they will retire few are ready for it.  Retirement is a drastic change in lifestyle, one in which you have to change some major habits and behaviors and learn new ones.

Prior to retirement I was a communications consultant who traveled a great deal. I absolutely loved mrunning through airportsy work.  I trained and coached executives, was a frequent keynote speaker at conventions and wrote extensively about communication.  My days started at 5 AM and often didn’t end until midnight.  I had a closet full of suits, ties and freshly pressed shirts and rarely wore anything else, there wasn’t time.

When I retired all of that came to a sudden and screeching halt and the shock was as intense as if I had been shot head first from a cannon into a brick wall target.  I was used to getting up and meeting with the captains of industry, but now in retirement I got up to Captain Crunch and an empty day.  I knew for a very long time, 12 years to be exact, that this day would come.  I had been told I would need a heart transplant and would get weaker and weaker until I got one.  The prediction came true in 2006.  Reluctantly I retired and late that year we moved from Eagan, Minnesota (a twin cities suburb) to Jacksonville, Florida because the Mayo clinic there had a great record of obtaining transplantable organs.

My first rescue from boredom came two months after I got a new heart from the very people who had saved my life, the Mayo Clinic.  One of my Mayo friends called to ask if I would like to write a blog (this one, Bob’s Newheart) and start a Facebook group with a focus on organ donation and transplantation (Organ Transplant Initiative).  This required some learning because I knew nothing about social media or blogging.  Both were in their infancy.  I dove headfirst into cyberspace and found it fascinating and fun because it called upon many of my old skills.

Manother booth shoty second rescuer was my wife Robin.  She ran two businesses out of our home one of them was
designing and making anodized aluminum jewelry.  She sold her colorful creations at art shows all over the south, and southeastern U.S.  In order to do that she not only needed a tent but the furnishings, too.  Items like display cases, necks for necklaces, pedestals, pictures and frames, and other items used to display her work are necessities and can be expensive.  She knew I had an interest in woodwork so she asked if I’d like to build some of those things.

“Oh fun,” was my first thought, but I had few tools.  Slowly and with great deliberation I built a woodworking shop and began to build what she needed to furnish her booth.  It became a never ending job because as styles and tastes changed so did the need for new and different furnishings.

That takes me to today.  This blog, Bob’s Newheart, is my 222nd since November 3, 2007 and the Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) now has nearly 4,000 members.  I have branched out in the woodworking department as well and have built a number of items for gifts for friends and family.  When I am not at my keyboard I am In my shop and have found that I am at least as busy now as I was when working and even happier.

So I got lucky, I stumbled into avocations that interested me and kept me busy to the point where I don’t miss the job from which I retired at all.  Now…what should you do?  How do you keep your mind and body active and engaged and avoid all the fears every spouse or partner has about retirement?  How do you avoid becoming a couch potato,couch potato 2 the stereotypical old person who sits in front of the TV all day eating unhealthy food and feeling sorry for him (her) self?  It’s really pretty easy and I can sum it up in one word –planning, but you have to do it now!  Check out this link. “http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/aging/retirement/10-tips-for-adjusting-to-retirement.htm

Whether you retire through necessity or choice you will retire and, as I said earlier, it can be a major shock to the system. Going from working a full-time job to having nowhere specific that you “have” to be each day may sound wonderful but it doesn’t always work out that way.  Some retired people feel bored and unproductive and when that happens, the days can seem endlessly long and empty. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Options for Action

Teaching

senior citizen teacherHave you considered teaching?  Even if that wasn’t your profession, it’s still something that you can do when you retire.  Teaching others what you’ve learned in the years spent in your chosen trade or profession can be very rewarding and some colleges and technical schools like to employ people with real-world experience.  You will also find that some companies employ speakers to share their knowledge and often those engagements result in contracts for more speeches or even training sessions.

 Speaking and/or Training

Speaking and training could be a paying gig, or you could do it simply for the joy of helping others.  One organization that might be of help is SCORE, the Service Corps of Retired Executives. SCORE bills itself as “counselors to America’s small business.”   Volunteers with the organization mentor small business owners, provide counseling, create and lead workshops, and write articles.

Move to an exotic location

I have a friend and former boss, Rick Lewis, who retired big time.  He moved to Cotacachi, Ecuador.
He sold almost all his earthly possessions and took with him only what he could carry, which wasn’t muc13654641373_736dfa7d31_nh.  He lives in the shadow of some beautiful mountains.  He walks everywhere, has lost a some extra pounds, buys food at open air markets at wonderfully low prices, has a much healthier diet, writes blogs about his experience and started a company that will help South American women be more independent.  He travels extensively and is enjoying life to the fullest and  while he has access to all the modern conveniences he uses few other than his computer and cell phone.

Go Back to School

I am convinced that to really enjoy your retirement years you must keep your brain actively engaged and what better for that than the learning environment.  Taking classes ins something that interests you can keep your mind razor sharp but even more importantly it could give you the opportunity to learn more about a lifelong passion, or the start of aSenior studentnother career.  Maybe you wanted to play a musical instrument or learn woodwork or how to write a book…the possibilities are endless.

Best of all…you can go to school again at little or no cost.  There are grants and scholarships available y for senior citizens to attend college but often you don’t even need them.  Some colleges, universities and trade schools provide tuition waivers or discounts for seniors.

And…you can always audit a class, if you have no interest in getting a degree.   Auditing simply means that you attend and participate in the classes, but don’t take exams or receive a grade or credit for taking the class.  Check with the college or university of your choice.  You likely will find several Audit opportunities.

Hobbies

ow about a hobby? Yeah, I know everyone who counsels retirees says the same thing, “Get a hobby,” but it is good advice.  When I was a kid I used to play the harmonica.  At age 70 I took it up again.  Robin is already an accomplished musician and we often practice together.  Better yet, we are now involved in a once a week local jam session and my hobby has morphed into ownership of 15 harmonicas.

If you are at a loss as to what kind of hobby suits you, don’t give up. Keep looking.  Hobby and craft stores conduct free or inexpensive classes in knitting, scrapbooking, leatherwork, jewelry making and more.  You’ll also fin
harmonica collectiond that places like Home Depot and Lowes have classes in carpentry and other woodwork skills along with instruction on gardening.  Stores that sell kitchenware often have cooking classes.  There’s no end to what you can learn, but you have to look.  . Maybe you don’t want to learn how to do anything, but you’re interested in starting a collection. Whether you want to collect autographs or antique dolls, there are plenty of online groups and forums dedicated to your new hobby. Some of them meet in person or even hold conventions. No matter what your interest, you can find others out there with whom to discuss it.

Ok..you don’t want to take classes, free or not,  you just want a hobby that’s fun.  How about starting a collection?  As a youngster I always carried a pocket knife, they can come in very handy for a whole lot of reasons.  I remember, too, seeing a movie starring Allan Ladd called, “The Iron Mistress.”  It was about Jim Bowie of frontier and Alamo fame and how he developed the Bowie Knife.  Ever since then I wanted one of them.  At age 72 I started a knife collection (you can get some very nice knives at a very low cost through Amazon and other internet sites).  Today I have seven fixed blade knives (variations on the Bowie theme) and ten folding pocket knives.

Volunteer

aliensThen there is Volunteering.    God knows we need volunteers in almost any pursuit.  The University of Michigan conducted a study of retirees who were active volunteers and found that 40 percent were more likely to be alive at the end of the study than people who did not volunteer. [Wheeler]. If that isnt’ reason to consider volunteering for something I don’t know what is and — it keeps you moving and engaged.

Other volunteer opportunities include, helping out at local schools, animal shelters, museums and churches.  And…the area in which you can likely land a volunteer job right way…HealthCare.  Hospitals and nursing homes always need volunteers and you could be in on the ground floor of making a significant contribution  in those two areas alone.

I know, too, that there are organizations that specifically recruit senior citizens, such as Senior Corps where the Foster Grandparents program matches exceptional children with adults ages 60 and older who mentor them and help them with reading and schoolwork.  Talk about a rewarding experience…that one alone could give your ego a much needed boost.

Travel

If you like to travel and see the country consider an RV, the come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes from trailers to bus2012 traceres and in every price range.  We own a 30 foot travel trailer so when we go to art shows (we do about 20 a year) we bring our home and our dogs with us.  Of course that means you have to do some serious research into how you want to use your RV.  This can be a major purchase and it pays to take your time and thoroughly investigate every angle.  We love our RV and are old hands at it now and can highly recommend it if you like to travel, meet new people and live, “on the road.”

Become an employee again

Yep…that’s another term for work.  Maybe you need it so keep the door open to returning to the world of the retired but employed ranks.  It doesn’t have to be a full time job and it doesn’t have to be as a Wal Mart Greeter, although there is nothing wrong with that.  I have a 75 year old friend who works part time at a Menards store.  Menards is a Home Depot type story in the Midwest and they employ a good many senior citizens as do many companies. Here are some ideas on what you could do:

  • Hire out as a consultant on based on the expertise you gained while employed
  • Do research in your field for colleges and universities
  • Check city, county, state and federal government listings for openings that might appeal to you
  • Maybe you only want money for special occasions if so try seasonal work.  Companies are always seeking help during holiday seasons.
  • Entertainment venues like ball parks and theaters may need ushers to lead patrons to their seats
  • Customer service reps.  You could get a job answering the phone, working in sales or returns or even store security.
  • If you are handy with tools and can fix things around your home perhaps you can hire out as a handyman or woman on specific projects.
  • Tutor a student.  The money may not be great but there is some to be made tutoring both college and high school students.
  • Make things at home and sell them on line through Craigs list or by opening your own website.
  • Home care.  If you have some medical or therapy credentials you might quality to help care for either an adult or a child in their home
  • If you have bookkeeping or accounting skills many a small business could use you and chances are you could work from home.
  • Clerical work. If you can type and if you are computer literate you might get a part or full time job doing just that.

Essential skills.  

computerIt’s the 21st century and almost any job you take on is going to require computer literacy.  If you don’t know how to type it would be to your advantage to take a typing class and to learn basic word processing and even PowerPoint.

There is virtually no job anywhere today that is not going to require some computer skills so if volunteering or becoming employed again is an option you want to consider then by all means brush up on your computer and typing skills.

Mental and Physical Health

So far we’ve talked about what you can do to keep from being bored and to feel as though you have some value.  What’s missing from this blog, though, is how you take care of your health.  That issue beings with a word few like — Exercise.

No matter what the state of your health you must find ways to be active and to exercise.  Health expenses can be not only a huge financial burden, they can destroy your quality of life.  There are two kinds of exercise I recommend. One is mental and the other is physical.   You should read, research and write as often as possible and social media offers incredible opportunity to do all of that. Even games of solitaire or crossword puzzles can keep you mentally engaged and fit.

When it comes to physical exercise it is important to do what you can when you can.  A brisk walk every
day can do wonders for you and if that sounds boring, try Mall walking where at least you will see other people and iPeople walkingnteresting displays in stores and in the hallways.  If you play golf or tennis all the better, but any kind of activity that will exercise your muscles and elevate your heartbeat and respiration is good for you.

Remember above all else that you have great value.  Your years of service have given you invaluable experience from which others can learn.  Studies indicate that the years beyond midlife are one of life’s most creative, innovative and entrepreneurial periods for many and that us older people can be incredibly creative when given the opportunity. Check out this link for more information.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/personalfinance/2013/10/22/preparing-mentally-retirement/2885187/

When I was working I believed I had a mission and a purpose for being and that feeling was reinforced daily by clients who continued to hire me for my advice.  My fear was that upon retirement I would no longer have a purpose and that I would become irrelevant.  Well, that’s possible if you only think of yourself in terms of what you used to do, but what if you change the paradigm?  For example, I am no longer a communication consultant. I am an advocate for organ donation and transplantation and that has become my new relevancy, my new purpose and my new identity.  More and more there are people who know me for my new purpose and know nothing about what I used to be and do.  That’s an old life and frankly, I don’t miss it at all.

Relationships
Finally, the most important consideration of all, your relationship with your spouse or significant other.  Many of us who have worked outside the home for an entire lifetime are a pain in the butt when we are home all the time.  Our life partners aren’t used to it either and both have to make a concerted effort to work on strengthening this new retured couplerelationship.  In my case Robin has her business and I do what I can to help her, but otherwise am pretty much involved in my own activities.  We enjoy each other a great deal and often plan outings or dates when we can spend time together talking about and doing things unrelated to business or hobbies.

Retirement can be very rewarding, if you plan for it, but if you view retirement as the end of life you will be in for a miserable time because it can be the beginning and it should be.  It’s all in your attitude.  You can choose to quit or you can choose to explore new frontiers.  I am not a quitter and I’ll be most of you aren’t either and if that’s the case…get out and find those new frontiers.

Last Resorts

And….if all else fails try some of these:

  • Make a bucket list and start doing all the things on it
  • Make bird houses
  • Become a master gardener
  • Become an expert Starcraft player
  • Sail, backpack, walk[1] or cycle around the world[2]
  • Enter ham radio competitions (contact every state, etc.)
  • Read trashy novels
  • Have a lot of sex while your body is still in full working order
  • Fix up cars or motorcycles
  • Build a boat
  • Build a log cabin
  • Research your family tree
  • Watch birds
  • Amateur astronomy
  • Finally get adequate sleep
  • Become as healthy as possible
  • Save the world
  • Rebuild civilization from scratch
  • Live very well without money for a year
  • Go to the top of a high building and throw away $100.000
  • Burn $100.000 on a public place
  • Spend the last day in the job speaking all the truth to clients

You can find more here http://earlyretirementextreme.com/wiki/index.php?title=Long_list_of_things_to_do_when_you_retire

I always try to practice what I preach so let me recap where I am today at age 75 after a career that I absolutely loved.  My life has changed completely and I love every minute of it.  I am not only not bored, I don’t have time to be bored.  I am having too much fun doing the following:

  1. I took up the harmonica after a 60 year hiatus from it.  Now I own 15 of them and once a week my the Fig Newtonswife and I play in an old time music jam session.  Robin plays several instruments and often we spend an evening playing together.
  2. Woodwork. I’ve always loved working with wood but never had time.  Now I make fixtures and furnishings for Robin’s Art show booth.  I make jewelry boxes for friends and family, front with keyboard and buttonsand recently completed making a CD storage unit that looks like an accordion.
  3. Social media.  As you know I started and run Facebook’s nearly 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative group (OTI) and recently wrote my 223rd blog on Bob’s Newheart for WordPress.
  4. I am in the process of writing two books.  One is just a look at life from my earliest memories until now .  So far I have written about 145 pages, and that only got me to when I was 23 years old.  There’s a lot more to write.  The other book is fiction, it is about the first Hispanic President of the United States and the challenges he faces.  It’s part SCI FI, part  James Bond type action and heavy on political intrigue.
  5. I do the grocery shopping, some cooking a little housework and very little sitting.
  6. We travel the country going to art shows in which Robin sells he Jewelry creations.

I think you can tell, by that list that at age 75 I am a very busy guy.  Rarely do I sit still for long.  I absolutely refuse to be bored.  I think I lead a rather exciting life and I’m enjoying every moment of it.  You can do the same.  Retirement can be like being born again because it is what you make it.

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My new hat April 10 2014Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

 

From Zero to HOPE in 25 Quotes


Introduction by Bob Aronson

hope cartoon 5

When you are placed on the organ transplant list it is because you have been diagnosed with an end-stage disease and the only way to save your life is with an organ transplant.  Many look at the number of people on the list and the organ shortage and give up.  I did just that.  I thought I was too old and not sick enough and had given up hope.  I now know how foolish that was because despite all the odds against me, despite waiting for 12 years to get on the transplant list, despite being 68 years old at the time — I got a new heart after only 13 days on the list.  I was the right person in the right place at the right time with the right match.

There’s always hope – always.  Giving up hope is to die while still among the living.  Hope is powerful and hope is always your partner.  Don’t give up on her because she is always working for you.

The following quotes are among the best I could find on the issue of hope.  Read them, print them, tuck them away for reference and share them and above all…don’t give up.Mary lou retton cropped

 

1.    “Listen to the mustn’ts, child. Listen to the don’ts. Listen to the shouldn’ts, the impossibles, the won’ts. Listen to the never haves, then listen close to me… Anything can happen, child. Anything can be.”  –Sihel Silverstein

2.    “I believe that imagination is stronger than knowledge. That myth is more potent than history. That dreams are more powerful than facts. That hope always triumphs over experience. That laughter is the only cure for grief. And I believe that love is stronger than death.”–Robert Fulghum
goodtimes ahead sign

3.    “Hope is the thing with feathers
That perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words
And never stops at all.”  –Emily Dickinson

4.    “I like the night. Without the dark, we’d never see the stars.”  –Stephanie Meyer, Twilight

 

5.    “The things you do for yourself are gone when you are gone, but the things you do for others remain as your legacy.”  –Kalu Ndukwe Kaluwinnie the poo

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6.    “I have come to accept the feeling of not knowing where I am going. And I have trained myself to love it. Because it is only when we are suspended in mid-air with no landing in sight, that we force our wings to unravel and alas begin our flight. And as we fly, we still may not know where we are going to. But the miracle is in the unfolding of the wings. You may not know where you’re going, but you know that so long as you spread your wings, the winds will carry you.” –C. JoyBell C.

7.    The road that is built in hope is more pleasant to the traveler than the road built in despair, even though they both lead to the same destination.”  –Marion Zimmer Bradley

8.    “You can cut all the flowers but you cannot keep Spring from coming.”  –Pablo Neruda

 pessimist and optimist  harry truman

9.    Until the day when God shall deign to reveal the future to man, all human wisdom is summed up in these two words,–‘Wait and hope’. — Alexandre Dumas

 

 

10.There are no hopeless situations; there are only men who have grown hopeless about them.  —   Clare Booth Luce

 

11.Do not spoil what you have by desiring what you have not; but remember that what you now have was once among the things you only hoped for. – Epicurious

 

12.Hope never abandons you, you abandon it.” -George Weinberg

 

13.“Hope itself is a species of happiness, and, perhaps, the chief happiness which this world affords; but, like all other pleasures immoderately enjoyed, the excesses of hope must be expiated by pain.”  -Samuel Johnson

 

14. Enthusiasm is the yeast that makes your hopes shine to the stars. Enthusiasm is the sparkle in your eyes, the swing in your gait. The grip of your hand, the irresistible surge of will and energy to execute your ideas. — Henry Ford

 

15.When you get into a tight place and everything goes against you, till it seems as though you could not hang on a minute longer, never give up then, for that is just the place and time that the tide will turn. –Harriet Beecher Stowehope cartoon 4

 

16.“If you have made mistakes, there is always another chance for you. You may have a fresh start any moment you choose, for this thing we call “failure” is not the falling down, but the staying down.” –Mary Pickford

 

17.“Many of life’s failures are people who did not realize how close they were to success when they gave up.” –Thomas Edison

 

18.“Aerodynamically the bumblebee shouldn’t be able to fly, but the bumblebee doesn’t know that so it goes on flying anyway.” –Mary Kay Ash

 

19.“To love means loving the unlovable. To forgive means pardoning the unpardonable. Faith means believing the unbelievable. Hope means hoping when everything seems hopeless.” –G.K. Chesterson

 

20.Hope is tenacious. It goes on living and working when science has dealt it what should be its deathblow. PauL laurence Dunbar

 hope cartoon

21.Expectancy speeds progress. Therefore, live in a continual state of expectancy. No matter how much good you are experiencing today, expect greater good tomorrow. Expect to meet new friends. Expect to meet new and wonderful experiences. Try this magic of expectancy and you will soon discover a dramatic side to your work which gives full vent to constructive feeling. – Ernest Holmes

 

22.Hope is sweet-minded and sweet-eyed. It draws pictures; it weaves fancies; it fills the future with delight.—Henry Ward Beecher

 

23.A man begins to die when he ceases to expect anything from Tomorrow.—Abraham Miller

 

24.There is no medicine like hope, no incentive so great and no tonic so powerful as expectation of something better tomorrow – Orison Swett Marden

 

25.Hope is not like a lottery ticket you can sit on the sofa and clutch, feeling lucky…. optimism smilehope is an ax you break down doors with in an emergency — Rebecca Solnit


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bob magic kingdomBob Aronson is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder and primary author of the blogs on this site and the founder of Facebook’s over 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative group.

Now retired and living in Jacksonville, Florida with his wife Robin he spends his time advocating for patients with end stage diseases and for organ recipients.  He is also active in helping his wife with her art business at art festivals and on her Rockin Robin Prints site on Etsy. 

Bob is a former journalist, Governor’s Communication Director and international communications consultant.

60 More Inspirational Quotes to Help Make Your Day a Better One


Post by Bob Aronson

Quotes by people a lot smarter than Bob

This is blog number 179 and it was inspired by you, our readers.  Sometime back I published 76 inspirational  quotes and it became one of our most popular posts.  Even today it tops the list of what people are searching for on our blog site. 

People like to feel good and better yet they like to make other people feel good so here’s another 50 or so great quotes to brighten your day and perhaps to brighten the days of those near and dear to you.

One of my favorite quotations is from the Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam 

“Come, fill the cup, and in the fire of spring

The winter garment of repentance fling;

The  bird of time has but a little way to fly…

and lo!  The bird is on the wing.”

 Those four lines say a lot about living and about time and how it should be used.  If you’d like to read the entire Rubaiyat go to http://tehran.stanford.edu/Literature/Poetry/Omar_Khayyam.html

Please share the following with anyone  you choose.

“One can never consent to creep when one feels an impulse to soar.”  ~Helen Keller

“Sometimes you just have to take the leap and build your wings on the way down.”  ~Kobi Yamada

“Courage is not defined as the lack of fear. Courage is doing it anyway, even though you are afraid. It’s the ability to take action in spite of fear, challenge, pain and uncertainty.” ~Cynthia Perkins

“Life is not measured by the breaths we take, but by the moments that take our breath.”
~Unknown

“Those who touch our lives live forever in our hearts.”
~Unknown

“If you always do what you’ve always done, you’ll never get more than what you’ve already got.”
~Unknown

“Take care of your body. It’s the only place you have to live.”
~Jim Rohn

“When you throw your bread out on the waters of life, it frequently comes back buttered.”
~Mershon Niesner

“I don’t want life to imitate art. I want life to be art.”
~ Carrie Fisher

“It does not matter how slowly you go, so long as you do not stop.”
~Confucius

“Don’t fear failure so much that you refuse to try new things. The saddest summary of a life contains three descriptions: could have, might have, and should have.”
~ Louis E. Boone

“The miracle isn’t that I finished. The miracle is that I had the courage to start.”
~Unknown

“Whatever the struggle, continue the climb, it may be only one more step to the summit.”
~Diane Westlake

“Always listen to experts. They’ll tell you what can’t be done and why. Then do it.”
~Robert Heinlein

“If suffering brings wisdom, I would wish to be less wise”
~W.B. Yeats

“Only that which is deeply felt can change us. Because it is only in the heart that anything really happens.”
~Ladyfire.com

“Don’t just slow down and smell the flowers, look up and see the birds, too!”
~Deborah Burns, Simple Living Winter 2000

“The person who goes farthest is generally the one who is willing to do and dare. The sure-thing boat never gets far from shore.”
~Dale Carnegie

“The walls we build around us to keep sadness out also keeps out the joy.”
~Jim Rohn

“In Everyones life ,at some time, our inner fire goes out.  It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being.  We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the spirit.”
~Albert Schweister

“In love the paradox occurs that two beings become one and yet remain two.”
~Eric Fromm

“Our greatest glory is not in never falling, but in rising every time we fall.”
~Confucius

“Try to be the sort of person your dog thinks you are.”
~Jerry Parkins

“I shall be telling this with a sigh
Somewhere ages and ages hence:
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I —
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.”
~Robert Frost, The Road Not Taken

“Life is what happens to you when you’re busy making other plans.”
John Lennon

“When you get to the end of your rope, tie a knot and hang on.”
~Franklin D. Roosevelt
“You will never do anything in this world without courage. It is the greatest quality of the mind next to honor.
~James Allen

“The way I see it, if you want the rainbow, you gotta put up with the rain.”
~Dolly Parton

“Seek out that particular mental attribute which makes you feel most deeply and vitally alive, along with which comes the inner voice which says, “This is the real me,” and when you have found that attitude, follow it.”
~William James

“Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.”
~Ralph Waldo Emerson

“If you were going to die soon and had only one phone call you could make, who would you call and what would you say? And why are you waiting?”
~Stephen Levine

Do not criticize yourself because in darkness you could not see.
When you find the light within you, you will know that you have always been in the center of wisdom. As you probe deeper into who you really are, with your lightedness and your confusion, with you angers, longings and distortions, you will find the true living God.
Then you will say: I have known you all of my life and I have called you by many different names. I have called you mother and father and child. I have called you lover. I have called you sun and flowers. I have called you my heart.  But I never until this moment, called you myself.”
~Emmanuels Book

“It is not length of life, but depth of life.”
~Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Most of the important things in the world have been accomplished by people who have kept on trying when there seemed to be no hope at all.”
~Dale Carnegie

“How a man plays a game shows something of his character, how he loses shows all of it.”
~Unknown

“Compassion for myself is the most powerful healer of them all.”
~Theodore Isaac Rubin, M.D.

“You can search throughout the entire universe for someone who is more deserving of your love and affection than you are yourself, and that person is not to be found anywhere. you yourself, as much as anybody in the entire universe deserve your love and affection.”
~Buddha

If you don’t go after what you want, you’ll never have it.
If you don’t ask, the answers always no.
If you don’t step forward, you’re always in the same place.
~Nora Roberts
“Live not one’s life as though one had a thousand years, but live each day as the last.”
~Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

“When looking back, usually I’m more sorry for the things I didn’t do than for the things I shouldn’t have done.”
~Malcolm Forbes

“One of the secrets of life is to make stepping stones out of stumbling blocks.”
~Jack Penn

“Discoveries are often made by not following instructions; by going off the main road; by trying the untried.”
~Frank Tyger

“Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss it you will land among the stars.”
~Les Brown

“”Here is the test to find whether your mission on Earth is finished: if you’re alive, it isn’t.”
~Richard Bach

“I know a lot of people without brains who do an awful lot of talking.”
~The Scarecrow, Wizard of Oz

“In youth we learn; in age we understand.”
~Maria Ebner-Eschenbach

“One of the challenges of our lives is to integrate the pieces of our lives as we live them. It is sometimes tempting to try to deny huge periods of our lives or forget significant events, especially if they have been painful. To try to erase our past is to rob ourselves of our hard-earned wisdom.
~Anne Wilson Schaef

“Men occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of them pick themselves up and hurry off as if nothing had happened.”
~Winston Churchill

“It is a common experience that a problem difficult at night is resolved in the morning after the committee of sleep has worked on it.”
~John Steinbeck

“Beware of little expenses. A small leak will sink a great ship.”
~Benjamin Franklin

“Where we stand is not as important as the direction in which we are moving.”
~ Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

“When it is time to die, let us not discover that we have never lived.”
~Henry David Thoreau

“Venture nothing, and life is less than it should be.”
~Malcolm Forbes

“Vision is not enough, it must be combined with venture. It is not enough to stare up the steps, we must step up the stairs.”
~Vaclav Havel

“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results.”
~Albert Einstein

“There’s a fine line between genius and insanity. I have erased this line.”
~Oscar Levant

“Keeping an open mind is a virtue, but not so open that your brains fall out.
~James Oberg

“Do not follow where the path leads, Rather go where there is no path, and leave a trail.”
~David Perkins

“If we did all of the things that we are capable of doing, we would literally astound ourselves.”
~Thomas Edison

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

Between Your Heart and Mine


The song, “Between Your Heart and Mine” was written and produced by Gregory Todd a Nashville,Tennessee country musician.  He wrote the song as a tribute to a friend who had a transplant.  I wrote to Mr. Todd yesterday to let him know about this blog and when he responded he said, among other things, “Incidentally, my friend Alan, the inspiration behind the song, has been doing incredibly well after 20 months of carrying the heart of his donor. He has recently been cleared to take his first flight- and it’s to go see his 10 year old daughter perform in the Cheerleading Championships in Orlando. How great is that??”  The song shows up in many places on the internet and you can hear more of Mr. Todd’s work by going to his website http://www.gregorytodd.com/Home_Page_DVPA.php

“Between Your Heart and Mine” is a touching song and the story that many of us who have had transplants have already lived.  Please take the time to listen to it…close your eyes, listen, remember and give thanks.  This Christmas is special for those who have had transplants and who are getting them right now, but there are thousands of others still waiting.  Please say a little prayer for them while you enjoy Mr. Todd’s wonderful song. You can click on the link above to listen to the song.  The lyrics are below.

Merry Christmas and happy holidays to everyone.

Between Your Heart and Mine

As the doctors took their places
I could see my kids and wife
Blowing kisses for good luck, not goodbye

Seven months with just one question
Then you answered with your life
You had one foot crossing heaven
I was one small breath behind

But you saved me when you gave me
The miracle I needed to survive
Now we both can go on
Between your heart and mine

Between your heart and mine
I’ll live a life worth living
I’ll take what I’ve been given
And pass it down the line

I’ll cherish every moment
Then breathe it in and hold in for the rest of my life
Between your heart and mine

I heard what happened late that night
Drinker driving through the light
He drove your hopes and dreams right to the ground

Just seventeen, you went too soon
But on my life I swear to you
Each morning when I wake up, I’ll make sure you’re smiling down

Cause you saved me when you gave me
The miracle I needed now it’s beating deep inside
So we both can go on
Between your heart and mine

I’ve been praying for your family
Hoping one day comes around
When I can let them know their boy is safe and sound
Between your heart and mine

And that I’ll live a life worth living
I’ll take what I’ve been given and pass it down the line
I’ll cherish every moment
Then breathe it in and hold it for the rest of my life
I’ll keep this feeling for the rest of my life
Between your heart and mine

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

76 Inspirational Quotes to Help Make Your Day Better*


Being a pre or post transplant patient a donor or donor family or a caregiver can be very difficult.  Sometimes just a good word or two can make the difference between a good and a bad day.  With that in mind I thought that perhaps somewhere in this list of 76 quotes, there is a thought that will help make your day be a better one.

1. Life isn’t about finding yourself. Life is about creating yourself – George Bernard Shaw.

2. Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines.  Catch the trade winds in your sails.  Explore,  dream, discover….Mark Twain.

 3. Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds you plant – Robert Louis Stevenson.

4. We don’t see things the way they are. We see them the way WE are – Talmud.

5. I have found that if you love life, life will love you back – Arthur Rubinstein.

6. The reason people find it so hard to be happy is that they always see the past better than it was, the present worse than it is, and the future less resolved than it will be – Marcel Pagnol.

7. A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step – Lao Tzu.

8. Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive and go do it. Because what the world needs is more people who have come alive – Howard Thurman.

9. All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make, the better – Ralph Waldo Emerson.

10. Too many people spend money they haven’t earned, to buy things they don’t want, to impress people they don’t like – Will Rogers.

11. I skate to where the puck is going to be, not where it has been – Wayne Gretzky.

12. Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional – Anony-mouse.

13. Every man dies. Not every man really lives – William Ross Wallace.

14. Life isn’t a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, chocolate in one hand, latte in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out and screaming ‘Woohoo WHAT A RIDE’!

15. There are two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle – Albert Einstein.

16. Uncertainty is the only certainty there is, and knowing how to live with insecurity is the only security – John Allen Paulos.

17. You are not in this world to live up to other people’s expectations, nor should you feel the world must live up to yours – F Perl.

18. How you do one thing, is how you do everything. Be aware.

19. Life is either a daring adventure or nothing – Helen Keller.

20. Life is not about kissing a**, it’s about kicking a**!

21. The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it – Henry David Thoreau.

22.  Never be bullied into silence. Never allow yourself to be made a victim. Accept no one’s definition of your life; define yourself – Harvey Fierstein.

23. Be more concerned with your character than your reputation, because your character is what you really are, while your reputation is merely what others think you are – John Wooden.

24. In the end, it’s not going to matter howmany breathsyou took, but how many moments took your breath away – Shing Xiong.

25. Dance like the photo’s not being tagged. Love like you’ve never been unfriended. Sing like nobody’s following. Share like you care. And do it all like it won’t end up on youtube!

26. The most important thing in life is to learn how to give out love, and let it come in – Morrie Schwartz.

27. You cannot be lonely if you like the person you’re alone with – Dr. Wayne Dyer.

28. Happiness is like a butterfly.
The more you chase it, the more it eludes you.
But if you turn your attention to other things,
It comes and sits softly on your shoulder.
 – Henry David Thoreau

29. I think everyone should be told they’re beautiful until they believe it – Unknown

30. People were created to be loved. Things were created to be used. The reason the world is in chaos, is because things are being loved, and people are being used.

31. Dear Heart, fall in love only when you’re ready, not when you’re lonely – Anony-mouse.
32. ”It’s impossible” said pride. “It’s risky” said experience. “It’s pointless” said reason. “Give it a try” whispered the heart – Anonymous

33. To love oneself is the beginning of a lifelong romance – Oscar Wilde.

34. Being deeply loved by someone gives you strength, while loving someone deeply gives you courage – Lao Tzu.

35. When in doubt, choose Love.

36. Your task is not to seek love, but to seek and find all the barriers within yourself that you have built against it – Rumi.

37. Happiness always sneaks in a door you did not think was open – Anony-mouse.

38. Bitterness is like cancer. It eats upon the host. But anger is like fire. It burns it all clean – Maya Angelou.

39. Be happy while you’re living, for you’re a long time dead – Scottish Proverb.

40. The minute I heard my first love story, I started looking for you, not knowing how blind that was. Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere. They’re in each other all along – Rumi.

41. Being happy doesn’t mean that everything is perfect. It means that you’ve decided to look beyond the imperfections.

42. Whoever said money can’t buy happiness didn’t know where to shop – Gertrude Stein.

43. The appearance of things change according to the emotions and thus we see magic and beauty in them, while the magic and beauty really are in ourselves – Kahlil Gibran.

44. You’re at the zoo, you have a popsicle, how can you be unhappy? – Dewey, Malcolm in the Middle.

45.  Find the guy who calls you beautiful instead of hot, who calls you back when you hang up on him, who will lie under the stars and listen to your heartbeat, or stay awake just to watch you sleep. The one who turns to his friends and says, “thats her” – Anony-mouse.

46. Don’t worry. Be happy.

47. Self-worth comes from one thing – thinking that you are worthy.

48. Be helpful. When you see a person without a smile, give them yours – Zig Ziglar.

49. My life has  no purpos, no direction, no aim, no meaning, and yet I’m happy. I can’t figure it out. What am I doing right? – Charles Schultz (probably # 50!).

50. Happiness is a choice. Choose happy.

 51. If you’re going through hell, keep going – Winston Churchill.

52. Feelings come and feelings go. There is no need to fear them and no need to crave them. Let them come, and then let them go. No feeling is your permanent reality, no matter how intense it is.

53. No matter what, no matter how, where or who – you can almost always turn around and get a second chance – Anony-mouse.

54. When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened for us – Alexander Graham Bell.

http://www.andrewmitchellphotography.tumblr.com

55. The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man – George B Shaw.

56. You cannot solve a problem with the same mind that created it – Albert Einstein.

57. Do or Do Not. There is no Try – Yoda.

58. We must let go of the life we had planned so as to have the life that is waiting for us – Joseph Campbell.

59. You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face – Eleanor Roosevelt.

60. When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves – Viktor Frankl.

61. Change is inevitable. Progress is optional – Tony Robbins.

62. Be smart enough to hold on, be brave enough to let go. Sometimes, we need to hold onto faith while letting go of the outcome. Open your hand and hold your dreams gently, don’t try to grab them.

63. If you are irritated by every rub, how will you be polished? – Rumi

64. If there is anything that we wish to change in the child, we should first examine it and see whether it is not something that could better be changed in ourselves – Carl Jung.

65. I’ve developed a new philosophy. I only dread one day at a time – Charlie Brown

66. Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there – Will Rogers.

http://www.cpthatsme.com

67. The great thing in the world is not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving – Oliver W Holmes.

68. The harder you fall, the higher you bounce – Unknown.

69. I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I’ve ended up where I needed to be  – Douglas Adams.

70. The best way to predict the future is to create it.

71. People will hate you, rate you, shake you, and break you. But how strong you stand is what makes you – Unknown.

72. We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand – Randy Pausch.

73. You’ve got to do your own growing, no matter how tall your grandfather was – Irish proverb.

74. You are who you are and what you are because of what has gone into your mind. You can change who you are and what you are by changing what goes into your mind – Zig Ziglar

75. Whether you believe you can do a thing or not, you are right – Henry Ford.

76.  God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference – Reinhold Niebuhr. (The Serenity Prayer rocks!)

WANT MORE? GO TO https://bobsnewheart.wordpress.com/2013/08/01/half-a-hundred-quotes-on-hope-inspiration-love-and-living/

The entire list with great poster-like illustrations can be found at http://www.yourlifeyourway.net/2011/09/06/75-best-kickass-inspirational-quotes-on-life-love-happiness-change-growth/  

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

“The Letter” How to Write to Your Donor Family


Writing a personal letter of gratitude for an organ donation is the ultimate humbling experience. How do you begin to thank  someone for saving your life? Words don’t seem adequate when you would like to hug someone and hold their hand while you say think you.   It would seem almost impossible to express the gratitude you and your family feel.

Because of circumstances, though, words are your only choice therefore they should be carefully considered and come from your heart.  Your letter should show an appropriate amount of thoughtfulness and sincerity, it should not gush or be overly emotional. Balance is the key.

A handwritten letter is always best but, if your handwriting is like mine, a typed letter will be much easier for the recipient to read.

When you write, and I say when because “if” is usually not even a consideration , you should not only write and edit it yourself but also have someone you trust look it over.  Then read it out loud to the person to determine how he or she feels upon hearing the words.  This letter can be like no other you have ever written, because you will be talking to a total stranger; a family who lost a loved one and whose organ or tissue is now helping to keep you alive. Remember no matter when you write that the family may still be grieving.

Your letter cannot be sent directly from you to your donor family.  It must go through your transplant center.  Talk to  your coordinator or social worker about where to send you letter so it can be forwarded to your donor family.

Why A Thank You Letter is Important

Saying thank you is as much about the writer as it is about the reader. It is a social grace that benefits both parties equally.  Organ donation is a powerful reminder of just how wonderful gift giving can be…especially when the gift is one of life.

The death of a family member is a horrible experience, regardless of the nature or time of death.  When organ donation is a consideration the experience can become even more traumatic because while in the depths of pain and grief families must also make the decision to help others who are critically ill by donating their loved ones organs and/or tissues.   Knowing first-hand how the recipient’s life has changed and what they have been able to do since their transplant can help give meaning to the senselessness surrounding their loss. Sharing such the emotions of a life saving experience can the organ recipients recovery as well as helping the donor family through their grieving process.

Key Components of a “Thank you donor family” Letter

  1. Write your thank you letter by hand if possible because it indicates thoughtfulness and caring, and gives it the attention it deserves.  If you type the letter explain why you are doing so.
  2. Always keep in mind who your audience is.  It is the donor family, not yourself.  Don’t lose sight of that simple fact.
  3. Take the time to think and draft your letter before you write: It should be error free and look professional so the reader knows you gave it considerable time and consideration.
  4. Do not use canned and expected language.  Avoid clichés and “Sympathy Card” pseudo poetry but you can include a brief   quote from a famous person.
  5. Sincerity is key: avoid exaggerations and focus on highlighting a few specifics about the gift so as to remain credible with your message
  6. Compose a well thought out closure: think about a special close that truly encapsulates the spirit of your letter

What to say and what not to say

In this first letter it is important that all parties remain anonymous.  You should not include any information that might lead to your identity.   That means you should not include last names, streets or numbers, email addresses names of hospitals and names of physicians and staff.  If there is further correspondence or contact and both parties agree to exchanging identities then and only then is it appropriate to do so.

The safest assumption you can make is that the donor family is still grieving, regardless how much time has passed. Communicating with sensitivity is of utmost importance.

Here are some suggestions of what to include in your letter but remember, it must come from the heart and the words must be yours:

  1. Open your letter with “Dear Donor Family”
  2. Thank the donor family for their gift
  3. Speak about your transplant experience – consider including details surrounding your wait, the surgery and recovery
  4. Elaborate how the transplant has changed your life
  5. Use first names only and talk about yourself and your family
  6. Mention your occupation and any activities which you once again can enjoy
  7. Include photos (void of identifying information)

Sample Organ Donation Thank You Letter

Date

Dear Donor Family:

On August 21, 2007 I received a heart from your loved one. You, he and it saved my life. I promise I will take care of this gift far better than I took care of my own natural organ. Each day before I get up I take a moment to feel this marvelous gift steadily thumping in my chest. It is alive and healthy and has created in me a new appreciation for life.

More than that, though, I am always aware that this heart is not mine. It belongs to the kind of person all of us should aspire to be. Moreover, he came from the kind of people all of us should aspire to be. Maybe it is my imagination but since receiving my new heart, I feel a serenity I have never before felt. I feel a concern for others far greater than I thought possible. I feel a responsibility to all organ donors and their families to do what I can to honor their loved ones by committing the rest of my life to promoting organ donation.

I was very sick prior to my transplant. I could no longer get around very well because my heart just could not pump efficiently enough. I knew I was dying and as a 68 year-old man with COPD and B positive blood, I did not think a transplant was in the cards. But it was. As a result, I believe that God saved me for a reason and that reason was to promote organ donation to honor you and your loved one.

I appreciate the simple things now, much more than before. I look forward every morning to seeing my loving wife and caregiver, Robin. Staying in contact with family and friends has become more important than ever before. I enjoy sitting in our sunroom watching the sunrise and sunset. Each day gives me a new thrill because each day is a gift from you and from God.

I don’t know if we will ever meet and although I am likely to be at a loss for words, I would like to thank you personally. You gave me life, you gave me peace and you gave me a profound sense of gratitude and understanding. I am a new person and I hope that in your grief it helps to know that a part of your loved one is alive and that with his help I am trying to live my life in a way that would make you proud.

God bless

Bob, Robin and family

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love. You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net 

Are Profits More Important Than Cures?


By Bob Aronson

A Treatment for Almost Everything but Few Vaccines & Even Fewer Cures — Why?

Fair and balanced journalism is a very nice catch phrase but the stated goal is more than illusive, it is almost non-existent and that’s because there are never just two sides to a story.  There are often several sides so no matter how hard a reporter might try to be objective, there is no way you can cover every angle.  I do not pretend that this post is the endeavor of an investigative journalist, nor do I contend that this is an objective report.  What I offer here represents some observations and a few links to help illuminate the information.  I hope you find it useful.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the average life expectancy at the beginning of the 20th century was just over 47 years. A century later, that number had increased to nearly 78 years, due largely to the development of vaccinations and other treatments for deadly diseases.  We are living longer because medical science has provided us with treatments, medications, devices and surgeries that cure little but keep most threatening diseases at bay…and often at a phenomenal cost.

As a communications consultant specializing in healthcare I have worked with several pharmaceutical companies.  I know many researchers and I am aware of the dedication they bring to their jobs and to providing help to patients.  I know, too, how expensive it is to develop new drugs and all too often I have seen those efforts fail resulting in the loss of millions of hard-earned investor dollars.  In short, I have at least a passing acquaintance with the pharmaceutical industry and the financial risks they take to bring new drugs, treatments, procedures and devices to the marketplace.

At the same time I also understand the desire and the necessity to be profitable.  Without profitability no business can survive.  It is only fair to point out that the pharmaceutical industry (Big Pharma) has been incredibly profitable, despite the investments and even the losses.

Here is the list of the five biggest pharmaceutical companies based on 2010 revenues, in billions of dollars.

1.Pfizer                                                        $58,523,
Read the rest of this entry

To Remember Me — A Donor’s Request


To Remember Me

By Robert Noel Test (1926-1994)

The day will come when my body will lie upon a white sheet neatly tucked under four corners of a mattress located in a hospital; busily occupied with the living and the dying.

At a certain moment a doctor will determine that my brain has ceased to function and that, for all intents and purposes, my life has stopped. When that happens, do not attempt to instill artificial life into my body by the use of a machine. And don’t call this my deathbed. Let it be called the bed of life, and let my body be taken from it to help others lead fuller lives.

  • Give my sight to the man who has never seen a sunrise, a baby’s face or love in the eyes of a woman.
  • Give my heart to a person whose own heart has caused nothing but endless days of pain.
  • Give my blood to the teenager who was pulled from the wreckage of his car, so that he might live to see his grandchildren play.
  • Give my kidneys to the one who depends on a machine to exist from week to week.
  • Take my bones, every muscle, every fiber and nerve in my body and find a way to make a crippled child walk.
  • Explore every corner of my brain.
  • Take my cells, if necessary, and let them grow so that, someday a speechless boy will shout at the crack of a bat and a deaf girl will hear the sound of rain against her window.
  • Burn what is left of me and scatter the ashes to the winds to help the flowers grow.
  • If you must bury something, let it be my faults, my weakness and all prejudice against my fellow man….
  • If, by chance, you wish to remember me, do it with a kind deed or word to someone who needs you.

If you do all I have asked, I will live forever.

Bob Aronson is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s 1700 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the writer of most of these donation/transplantation blogs on Bob’s Newheart.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have a PowerPoint slide show for your use free and for use without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

 

“RockScar Love is where “Scars R Sexy”


Amy Tippins spends every waking moment thinking about or doing something about organ donation, helping other people and spreading joy.   She is the creative genius behind “Rock Scar Love” which celebrates the scars we accumulate through life.  She views these scars as badges of honor and encourages everyone she meets to view them the same way.  Today’s blog is written by Amy with my encouragement and support.  Please heed her words and help out.  Bob Aronson

My senior year of high school was supposed to be spent figuring out which college was going to offer me the best swimming scholarship.  My emotions were supposed to be spent on fighting my mother and trying to earn my independence.

Instead of negotiating how to pay for the next four years of college  I was negotiating with God on if I was going to live through them.  For five years, I had been in liver failure due to approximately two dozen tumors that had been slowly killing me.  I was not fighting with my mother (okay, maybe a little), but my own body.  As a teenager, I was fully aware of my own mortality.

As I reflect on the holiday season that has just passed I am reminded, as I am every year, that I was told I needed a life-saving liver transplant during the week of Christmas 1992.  For the following two months I wondered if I would get my second chance and what it would look like?  1992 was before you could Google “liver transplant” on the web and most likely, it was before Al Gore invented the internet.  When I was evaluated for my liver transplant it was during a time that the long term success of organ donation was still unknown, but the need of for organs was not so desperate.  As my transplant doctor said, “We had more livers than recipients”.  What I did not know was how much my life was going to change in so many amazing ways because of organ donation and how through it I would find my purpose.

Two years ago, I decided to “pay it forward” for what I was given.  Therefore, I started RockScar Love Designs (www.rockscarlove.com) a company that celebrates scars.  We celebrate beautiful scars and the lessons they teach us.  Through my scar, I have come to understand who I am and why I am worthy of celebration and love.  Through my scar, I have come to love who I am and realize that transplantation was my path to opening up my heart to a love beyond my imagination…love for myself!

Starting soon, in late March, RockScar Love Designs and Live Wright Society, a non profit promoting people and causes paying it forward (www.livewrightsociety.org), will be sponsoring the “Scars R Sexy” campaign.  We will be sharing over 20,000 scar stories across the US.  This is not about a physical scar or one particular type of scar, but about all scars and the people who bear them from all walks of life as they embrace their journey and realize that their story is one to be proud of; that scars are something to be embraced as beautiful and that we should all rise up to say “I love my scar because it means I have won — because I have championed what has tried to defeat me!  I am amazing and beautiful for all that I have been through”.

In order to make this campaign successful, RSL and LWS need each and every person that reads this to share our campaign and what it means to you by going to our Facebook page and becoming a fan as well as sharing the page: http://tinyurl.com/7pz5t8w Scars R Sexy)   If you believe in anyone who has a scar of a physical, emotional or psychological sort, we ask you to be a part of this campaign by sharing it with everyone you know.  Without your support, our scars will remain hidden!

You can find RockScar Love Products at www.rockscarlove.com.  We offer t-shirts, baseball caps and multiple other items with a scar theme.  15-20% of all sales go back to charity with a focus on transplant and pediatric based charities!  I also dedicate large portions of my time to mentoring transplant patients, speaking at charity events, serving on board of NKF GA/AL and raising money for Camp Independence.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues.  When you leave this site go to our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative and join. The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

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