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Clinical Depression. You Can Defeat Your Demons!


By Bob Aronson

loneliness cartoonDepression, what is it? Why can’t you just snap out of it? Many people including family and friends who have not experienced depression have great difficulty understanding it much like people who are not addicts can’t understand addiction. In both cases we often hear advice like, “Snap out of it, you’ve got things pretty good. There’s no reason to be depressed.” Or, “You made the choice to start drinking or using drugs so choose to stop.” Oh, if it were that simple.

Here’s a cold slap in the face to bring us into reality. Depression is a mental illness, like the common cold is a physical illness. There has long been a stigma associated with mental illness held over from the days of Insane Asylums and “Crazy” people. That stigma is rapidly disappearing because so many people suffer from depression which is often a chemical imbalance that is quite treatable. Your mental health is every bit as important as your physical health and one can affect the other.

Here are some shocking statistics from the National Institutes of Mental Health (NIMH).

Major Depressive Disorder

  • Major Depressive Disorder is the leading cause of disability in the U.S. for ages 15-44.3
  • Major depressive disorder affects approximately 14.8 million American adults, or about 6.7 percent of the U.S. population age 18 and older in a given year.1, 2
  • While major depressive disorder can develop at any age, the median age at onset is 32.5
  • Major depressive disorder is more prevalent in women than in men

Major or clinical depression is an awful feeling. It is a gnawing at the pit of your stomach, in your gut that makes you feel hopeless, helpless and alone. It is as though someone locked up your ability to reason, your sense of humor and your will to live in a windowless, dark, solitary confinement jail cell from which there is no escape. It is a constant feeling of impending doom combined with a profound sadness and even fear. It can steal your energy, memory, concentration, sex drive, interest in activities you used to love and…it can even destroy your will to live. Depression may not be as common as the common cold but it is much more common than ever before. Nearly 20 percent of Americans suffer from it at one time or another.

Logic says that you should be able to “Will” yourself out of this mood, but will power alone cannot give you tStop being sadhe boost you need to get your life’s engine started again. Mental illness is not unlike physical illness. You cannot use will power to eliminate depression any more than you could use it to stop cancer. No one wants to be depressed, no one,. Think about it. If will power would work as an anti-depressant there would be no depression because again, no one wants to feel like what I described.

Let’s get to the medical description and symptoms as offered by the Mayo Clinic. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/depression/expert-answers/clinical-depression/faq-20057770

“To be diagnosed with clinical depression, you must have five or more of the following symptoms over a two-week period, most of the day, nearly every day. At least one of the symptoms must be either a depressed mood or a loss of interest or pleasure. Signs and symptoms may include:
• Depressed mood, such as feeling sad, empty or tearful (in children and teens, depressed mood can appear as constant irritability)
• Significantly reduced interest or feeling no pleasure in all or most activities
• Significant weight loss when not dieting, weight gain, or decrease or increase in appetite (in children, failure to gain weight as expected)
• Insomnia or increased desire to sleep
• Either restlessness or slowed behavior that can be observed by others
• Fatigue or loss of energy
• Feelings of worthlessness, or excessive or inappropriate guilt
• Trouble making decisions, or trouble thinking or concentrating
• Recurrent thoughts of death or suicide, or a suicide attempt
Your symptoms must be severe enough to cause noticeable problems in relationships with others or in day-to-day activities, such as work, school or social activities. Symptoms may be based on your own feelings or on the observations of someone else.
Clinical depression can affect people of any age, including children. However, clinical depression symptoms, even if severe, usually improve with psychological counseling, antidepressant medications or a combination of the two.”

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has this to say about depression.

What causes depression?

Several factors, or a combination of factors, may contribute to depression.
• Genes—people with a family history of depression may be more likely to develop it than those whose families do not have the illness.
• Brain chemistry—people with depression have different brain chemistry than those without the illness.
• Stress—loss of a loved one, a difficult relationship, or any stressful situation may trigger depression.
Depression affects different people in different ways.
• Women experience depression more often than men. Biological, life cycle, and hormonal factors that are unique to women may be linked to women’s higher depression rate. Women with depression typically have symptoms of sadness, worthlessness, and guilt.
• Men with depression are more likely to be very tired, irritable, and sometimes even angry. They may lose interest in work or activities they once enjoyed, and have sleep problems.
• Older adults with depression may have less obvious symptoms, or they may be less likely to admit to feelings of sadness or grief. They also are more likely to have medical conditions like heart disease or stroke, which may cause or contribute to depression. Certain medications also can have side effects that contribute to depression.
• Children with depression may pretend to be sick, refuse to go to school, cling to a parent, or worry that a parent may die. Older children or teens may get into trouble at school and be irritable. Because these signs can also be part of normal mood swings associated with certain childhood stages, it may be difficult to accurately diagnose a young person with depression.

get out of bedOk we’ve defined the malady and we know how clinicians determine if patients have it so the next logical question is, “What can you do about it.” Well, the answer is simple, but it will take a major commitment on your part to make the answer work for you, we can start by identifying some hazards, potholes on the road to good mental health.

Depression: Ten Traps to Avoid

Dr. Stephen Ilardi, author of “The Depression Cure,” has identified several things that can make depression worse. First, know this. Depression is a serious medical condition and should be treated by a doctor or licensed therapist. Having said that, here”s what Dr. Ilardi suggests.

Trap 1: Being a Couch Potato

When you’re feeling down, it’s tempting to hole up in your bed or on the couch. Yet exercise – Even moderate activityclinical depression image like brisk walking – has been shown to be at least as effective against depression as antidepressant medication. It works by boosting the activity of the “feel-good” neurochemicals dopamine and serotonin.
For an “antidepressant dose” of exercise, try at least 40 minutes of brisk walking or other aerobic activity three times a week.

Trap 2: Not Eating “Brain Food”

Omega-3 fats are key building blocks of brain tissue. But the body can’t make omega-3s; they have to come from our diets. Unfortunately, most Americans don’t consume nearly enough Omega-3s, and a deficiency leaves the brain vulnerable to depression. Omega-3s are found in wild game, cold-water fish and other seafood, but the most convenient source is a fish oil supplement. Ask your doctor about taking a daily dose of 1,000 mg of EPA, the most anti-inflammatory form of omega-3.

Trap 3: Avoiding Sunlight

Sunlight exposure is a natural mood booster. It triggers the brain’s production of serotonin, decreasing anxiety and giving a sense of well-being. Sunlight also helps reset the body clock each day, keeping sleep and other biological rhythms in sync.

During the short, cold, cloudy days of winter, an artificial light box can substitute effectively for missing sunlight. In fact, 30 minutes in front of a bright light box each day can help drive away the winter blues.

Trap 4: Not Getting Enough Vitamin D

Most people know vitamin D is needed to build strong bones. But it’s also essential for brain health. Unfortunately, more than 80 percent of Americans are vitamin D deficient. From March through October, midday sunlight exposure stimulates vitamin D production in the skin – experts advise five to 15 minutes of daily exposure (without sunscreen). For the rest of the year, ask your doctor about taking a vitamin D supplement.

Trap 5: Having Poor Sleep Habits

sleepChronic sleep deprivation is a major trigger of clinical depression, and many Americans fail to get the recommended seven to eight hours a night. How can you get better sleep?

Use the bed only for sleep and sex – not for watching TV, reading, or using a laptop. Turn in for bed and get up at the same time each day. Avoid caffeine and other stimulants after midday. Finally, turn off all overhead lights

Trap 6: Avoiding Friends and Family

When life becomes stressful, people often cut themselves off from others. That’s exactly the wrong thing to do, as research has shown that contact with supportive friends and family members can dramatically cut the risk of depression. Proximity to those who care about us actually changes our brain chemistry, slamming the brakes on the brain’s runaway stress circuits.

Trap 7: Mulling Things Over

When we’re depressed or anxious, we’re prone to dwelling at length on negative thoughts – rehashing themes of rejection, loss, failure, and threat, often for hours on end. Such rumination on negative thoughts is a major trigger for depression – and taking steps to avoid rumination has proven to be highly effective against depression.

How can you avoid rumination? Redirect attention away from your thoughts and toward interaction with others, or shift your focus to an absorbing activity. Alternatively, spend 10 minutes writing down the troubling thoughts, as a prelude to walking away from them.

Trap 8: Running with the Wrong Crowd

Scientists have discovered that moods are highly contagious: we “catch” them from the people around us, the result of specialized mirror neurons in the brain. If you’re feeling blue, spending time with upbeat, optimistic people might help you “light up” your brain’s positive emotion circuits.

Trap 9: Eating Sugar and Simple Carbs

Researchers now know that a depressed brain is an inflamed brain. And what we eat largely determines simple carbsour level of inflammation. Sugar and simple carbs are highly inflammatory: they’re best consumed sparingly, if at all.

In contrast, colorful fruits and veggies are chockablock with natural antioxidants. Eating them can protect the body’s omega-3s, providing yet another nice antidepressant boost.

Trap 10: Failing to Get Help

Depression can be a life-threatening illness, and it’s not one you should try to “tough out” or battle on your own. People experiencing depression can benefit from the guidance of a trained behavior therapist to help them put into action depression-fighting strategies like exercise, sunlight exposure, omega-3 supplementation, anti-ruminative activity, enhanced social connection, and healthy sleep habits.

So you think you’ve avoided all the traps, but you are still depressed, now what? According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) here are the options. (http://www.nami.org/Content/NavigationMenu/Mental_Illnesses/Depression/Depression_Treatment,_Services_and_Supports.htm)

Treating Major Depression

pillsAlthough depression can be a devastating illness, it often responds to treatment. The key is to get a specific evaluation and a treatment plan. Today, there are a variety of treatment options available for depression. There are three well-established types of treatment: medications, psychotherapy and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). A new treatment called transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), has recently been cleared by the FDA for individuals who have not done well on one trial of an antidepressant. For some people who have a seasonal component to their depression, light therapy may be useful. In addition, many people like to manage their illness through alternative therapies or holistic approaches, such as acupuncture, meditation, and nutrition. These treatments may be used alone or in combination. However, depression does not always respond to medication. Treatment resistant depression (TRD) may require a more extensive treatment regimen involving a combination of therapies.

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Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 4,000 mmagic kindom in backgroundember Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Laughter Really is the Best Medicine


Compiled by Bob Aronson

laughter is the best medicine

It has been said that laughter is the best medicine. It may not cure what ails you but it sure can offer some much needed relief.

We all need to laugh or at least show a toothy grin once in a while and so I decided to depart from our normal very serious posts to provide a lighter touch.  As far as I know all of these one or two-liners are public domain so enjoy, spread them around and laugh a little. 

I should warn you that this is not your dad’s collection of one-liners —there are a lot of them.  This is one of the best listings you will find.  They range from groaners to belly laughs to falling on the floor funny.

These snapshots of standup comedy were taken from some of the greatest humorists of our time both living and dead.  I hope you enjoy reading them as much as I did finding them.  Brief bios of the comics are from Wikipedia. 

This post was written in Microsoft Word.  The formatting was correct there but  Word and WordPress are not always compatible.  I apologize for unnecessary punctuation and other assorted faults. 

Also, I know some of you are going to say, “You left out so and so.”  Many great humorists were left out because I was searching for one liners only…I did not conduct a search based on individuals or jokes, ethnic groups,  gender, races or religions.

Henny Youngman

Henny YoungmanHenry “Henny” Youngman (original Russian surname Yungman;[1] 16 March 1906 – 24 February 1998) was a British-American comedian and violinist famous for “one-liners“, short, simple jokes usually delivered rapid-fire. His best known one-liner was “Take my wife—please.”

In a time when many comedians told elaborate anecdotes, Youngman’s comedy routine consisted of telling simple one-liner jokes, occasionally with interludes of violin playing. These gags depicted simple, cartoon-like situations, eliminating lengthy build-ups and going straight to the punch line. He was known as the King of the One Liners, a title bestowed upon him by columnist Walter Winchell.

 “I told the doctor I broke my leg in two places. He told me to stop going to those places.”

“A drunk was in front of a judge. The judge says “You’ve been brought here for drinking.” The drunk says “Okay, let’s get started.”

“When I read about the evils of drinking, I gave up reading.”

“I once wanted to become an atheist, but I gave up – they have no holidays.”

“If you’re going to do something tonight that you’ll be sorry for tomorrow morning, sleep late.”

“Some people ask the secret of our long marriage. We take time to go to a restaurant two times a week. A little candlelight, dinner, soft music and dancing. She goes Tuesdays, I go Fridays. ”

“I’ve got all the money I’ll ever need. If I die by 4:00.”

“My grandmother is over eighty
and she still doesn’t need glasses. Drinks right out of the bottle.”

“When you battle with your conscience and lose, you win. -Henny Youngman, comedian and violinist (1906-1998)”

“My dad was the town drunk. Most of the time that’s not so bad; but New York City?”

“The secret of a happy marriage remains a secret.”

 

Ellen DeGeneris

Ellen DeGenerisEllen Lee DeGeneres (/dɨˈɛnərəs/; born January 26, 1958) is an American stand-up comedian, television host, and actress. She has hosted the syndicated talk show The Ellen DeGeneres Show since 2003.

As a film actress, she starred in Mr. Wrong, appeared in EDtv and The Love Letter, and provided the voice of Dory in the Disney-Pixar animated film Finding Nemo, for which she was awarded the Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress, the only time a voice performance has won a Saturn Award. She was a judge on American Idol in its ninth season. DeGeneres has hosted both the Academy Awards and the Primetime Emmys.

She starred in two television sitcoms, Ellen from 1994 to 1998 and The Ellen Show from 2001 to 2002. She has won thirteen Emmys and numerous other awards for her work and charitable efforts.  Ellen says,  “For me, it’s that I contributed, … That I’m on this planet doing some good and making people happy. That’s to me the most important thing, that my hour of television is positive and upbeat and an antidote for all the negative stuff going on in life.”

 

I don’t understand the sizes anymore. There’s a size zero, which I didn’t even know that they had. It must stand for: ‘Ohhh my God, you’re thin.’

 

I gotta work out. I keep saying it all the time. I keep saying I gotta start working out. It’s been about two months since I’ve worked out. And I just don’t have the time. Which uh..is odd. Because I have the time to go out to dinner. And uh..and watch tv. And get a bone density test. And uh.. try to figure out what my phone number spells in words.

 

I was coming home from kindergarten–well they told me it was kindergarten. I found out later I had been working in a factory for ten years. It’s good for a kid to know how to make gloves.

 

I was in yoga the other day. I was in full lotus position. My chakras were all aligned. My mind is cleared of all clatter and I’m looking out of my third eye and everything that I’m supposed to be doing. It’s amazing what comes up, when you sit in that silence. ‘Mama keeps whites bright like the sunlight, Mama’s got the magic of Clorox 2.’

 

My grandmother started walking five miles a day when she was sixty. She’s ninety-seven now, and we don’t know where the hell she is.

 

Procrastination isn’t the problem, it’s the solution. So procrastinate now, don’t put it off.

 

Sometimes you can’t see yourself clearly until you see yourself through the eyes of others.

 

Stuffed deer heads on walls are bad enough, but it’s worse when they are wearing dark glasses and have streamers in their antlers because then you know they were enjoying themselves at a party when they were shot.

 

The only thing that scares me more than space aliens is the idea that there aren’t any space aliens. We can’t be the best that creation has to offer. I pray we’re not all there is. If so, we’re in big trouble.

 

In the beginning there was nothing. God said, ‘Let there be light!’ And there was light. There was still nothing, but you could see it a whole lot better.

 

I don’t need a baby growing inside me for nine months. For one thing, there’s morning sickness. If I’m going to feel nauseous and achy when I wake up, I want to achieve that state the old fashioned way: getting good and drunk the night before.

 

I’m a godmother, that’s a great thing to be, a godmother. She calls me god for short, that’s cute, I taught her that.

 

Sometimes when I am driving I get so angry at inconsiderate drivers that I want to scream at them. But then I remember how insignificant that is, and I thank God that I have a car and my health and gas. That was phrased wrong – normally you wouldn’t say, thank God I have gas.

 

The good psychic would pick up the phone before it rang. Of course it is possible there was no one on the other line. Once she said “God Bless you” I said, “I didn’t sneeze” She looked deep into my eyes and said, “You will, eventually.” And damn it if she wasn’t right. Two days later I sneezed.

 

The way I see it… If you need both of your hands for whatever it is you’re doing, then your brain should probably be in on it too.

 

I have the worst memory ever so no matter who comes up to me – they’re just, like, ‘I can’t believe you don’t remember me!” I’m like, ‘Oh Dad I’m sorry!’

 

Rodney Dangerfield

Rodney DangerfieldRodney Dangerfield (born Jacob Rodney Cohen, November 22, 1921 – October 5, 2004) was an American comedian and actor, known for the catchphrase “I don’t get no respect!” and his monologues on that theme. He is also remembered for his 1980s film roles, especially in Easy Money, Caddyshack, and Back to School.

At the age of 15, he began to write for standup comedians, and began to perform at the age of 20 under the name Jack Roy.[8] He struggled financially for nine years, at one point performing as a singing waiter until he was fired, and also working as a performing acrobatic diver before giving up show business to take a job selling aluminum siding to support his wife and family. He later said that he was so little known then that “at the time I quit, I was the only one who knew I quit!”

My wife and I were happy for twenty years. Then we met.

I’ll tell ya, my wife and I, we don’t think alike. She donates money to the homeless, and I donate money to the topless!

One night I came home. I figured, let my wife come on. I’ll play it cool. Let her make the first move. She went to Florida.

I asked my old man if I could go ice-skating on the lake. He told me, “Wait til it gets warmer.”

My doctor told me to watch my drinking. Now I drink in front of a mirror.

I drink too much. Way too much. My doctor drew blood. He ran a tab.

When I was born the doctor came out to the waiting room and said to my father, “I’m very sorry. We did everything we could…but he pulled through.”

I come from a stupid family. During the Civil War my great uncle fought for the west!

My father was stupid. He worked in a bank and they caught him stealing pens.

My mother had morning sickness after I was born.

My father carries around the picture of the kid who came with his wallet.

When I played in the sandbox the cat kept covering me up.

I could tell that my parents hated me. My bath toys were a toaster and a radio.

One year they wanted to make me poster boy… for birth control.

I remember the time I was kidnapped and they sent back a piece of my finger to my father. He said he wanted more proof.

My uncle’s dying wish was to have me sitting on his lap. He was in the electric chair.

One time I went to a hotel. I asked the bellhop to handle my bag. He felt up my wife!

This morning when I put on my underwear I could hear the Fruit of the Loom guys laughing at me.

I’m a bad lover. Once I caught a peeping tom booing me.

My wife only has sex with me for a purpose. Last night she used me to time an egg.

It’s tough to stay married. My wife kisses the dog on the lips, yet she won’t drink from my glass!

My wife isn’t very bright. The other day she was at the store, and just as she was heading for our car, someone stole it! I said, “Did you see the guy that did it?” She said, “No, but I got the license plate.”

Last night my wife met me at the front door. She was wearing a sexy negligee. The only trouble was, she was coming home.

A girl phoned me and said, “Come on over. There’s nobody home.” I went over. Nobody was home!

A hooker once told me she had a headache.

I went to a massage parlor. It was self service.

If it weren’t for pick-pocketers, I’d have no sex life at all.

Once when I was lost I saw a policeman and asked him to help me find my parents. I said to him, “Do you think we’ll ever find them?” He said, “I don’t know kid. There are so many places they can hide.”

I remember I was so depressed I was going to jump out a window on the tenth floor. They sent a priest up to talk to me. He said, “On your mark…”

When my old man wanted sex, my mother would show him a picture of me.

I had a lot of pimples too. One day I fell asleep in a library. I woke up and a blind man was reading my face.

My wife made me join a bridge club. I jump off next Tuesday.

Last week my tie caught on fire. Some guy tried to put it out with an ax!

I met the surgeon general. He offered me a cigarette.

I was making love to this girl and she started crying. I said, “Are you going to hate yourself in the morning?” She said, “No, I hate myself now.”

I knew a girl so ugly that she was known as a two-bagger. That’s when you put a bag over your head in case the bag over her head breaks.

I knew a girl so ugly, they use her in prisons to cure sex offenders.

I knew a girl so ugly, I took her to the top of the Empire State building and planes started to attack her.

I knew a girl so ugly, the last time I saw a mouth like hers it had a hook on the end of it.

I knew a girl so ugly, she had a face like a saint–a Saint Bernard!

I was tired one night and I went to the bar to have a few drinks. The bartender asked me, “What’ll you have?” I said, “Surprise me.” He showed me a naked picture of my wife.

During sex my wife always wants to talk to me. Just the other night she called me from a hotel.

My marriage is on the rocks again. Yeah, my wife just broke up with her boyfriend.

One day as I came home early from work, I saw a guy jogging naked. I said to the guy, “Hey buddy…why are you doing that for?” He said, “Because you came home early.”

I went to see my doctor… Doctor Vidi-boom-ba. Yeah…I told him once, “Doctor, every morning when I get up and look in the mirror I feel like throwing up. What’s wrong with me? He said, “I don’t know, but your eyesight is perfect.”

I told my dentist my teeth are going yellow. He told me to wear a brown necktie.

My psychiatrist told me I’m going crazy. I told him, “If you don’t mind, I’d like a second opinion.” He said, “All right. You’re ugly too!”

I was so ugly, my mother used to feed me with a slingshot!

When I was born the doctor took one look at my face, turned me over and said, “Look, twins!”

And we were poor too. Why, if I wasn’t born a boy, I’d have nothing to play with!

With my wife I don’t get no respect. I made a toast on her birthday to ‘the best woman a man ever had.’ The waiter joined me.

I’m not a sexy guy. I went to a hooker. I dropped my pants. She dropped her price.

I tell you, I’m not a sexy guy. I was the centerfold for Playgirl magazine. The staples covered everything!

What a childhood I had, why, when I took my first step, my old man tripped me!

Last week I told my psychiatrist, “I keep thinking about suicide.” He told me from now on I have to pay in advance.

I tell ya when I was a kid, all I knew was rejection. My yo-yo, it never came back!

Oh, when I was a kid in show business I was poor. I used to go to orgies to eat the grapes.

When I was a kid I got no respect. The time I was kidnapped, and the kidnappers sent my parents a note they said, “We want five thousand dollars or you’ll see your kid again.”

I tell ya, my wife was never nice. On our first date, I asked her if I could give her a goodnight kiss on the cheek – she bent over!

I tell you, with my doctor, I don’t get no respect. I told him, “I’ve swallowed a bottle of sleeping pills.” He told me to have a few drinks and get some rest.

Some dog I got too. We call him Egypt because he leaves a pyramid in every room.

With my dog I don’t get no respect. He keeps barking at the front door. He don’t want to go out. He wants me to leave.

What a dog I got. His favorite bone is in my arm!

Last week I saw my psychiatrist. I told him, “Doc, I keep thinking I’m a dog.” He told me to get off his couch.

I worked in a pet store and people kept asking how big I’d get.

Groucho Marx

groucho marxJulius Henry “Groucho” Marx (October 2, 1890[1] – August 19, 1977) was an American comedian and film and television star. He is known as a master of quick wit and widely considered one of the best comedians of the modern era.[2] His rapid-fire, often impromptu delivery of innuendo-laden patter earned him many admirers and imitators.

He made 13 feature films with his siblings the Marx Brothers, of whom he was the third-born. He also had a successful solo career, most notably as the host of the radio and television game show You Bet Your Life.[3]

His distinctive appearance, carried over from his days in vaudeville, included quirks such as an exaggerated stooped posture, glasses, cigar, and a thick greasepaint mustache and eyebrows. These exaggerated features resulted in the creation of one of the world’s most ubiquitous and recognizable novelty disguises, known as “Groucho glasses“, a one-piece mask consisting of horn-rimmed glasses, large plastic nose, bushy eyebrows and mustache.[4]

Who are you going to believe, me or your own eyes?

I have nothing but respect for you …and not much of that.

Time flies like an arrow. Fruit flies like a banana.

Room service? Send up a larger room.

Those are my principles. If you don’t like them, I have others.

He may look like an idiot and talk like an idiot, but don’t let that fool you. He really is an idiot.

I never forget a face, but in your case I’d be glad to make an exception.

A child of five could understand this. Fetch me a child of five!

From the moment I picked your book up until I laid it down, I was convulsed with laughter. Someday I intend to read it.

You know I could rent you out as a decoy for duck hunters?

You’ve got the brain of a four-year-old boy …and I’ll bet he was glad to get rid of it.

Why should I care about posterity? What’s posterity ever done for me?

Why, I’d horse-whip you… if I had a horse.

Military justice is to justice what military music is to music.

Military intelligence is a contradiction in terms.

One morning I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he got into my pajamas, I’ll never know.

I must say that I find television very educational. The minute somebody turns it on, I go to the library and read a book.

I’ve had a perfectly wonderful evening, but this wasn’t it.

If I held you any closer, I’d be on the other side of you.

I must confess, I was born at a very early age.

I don’t care to belong to a club that accepts people like me as members.

I was married by a judge. I should have asked for a jury.

(taking someone’s pulse) Either he’s dead or my watch has stopped.

Why was I with her? She reminds me of you. In fact, she reminds me more of you than you do!

Well, art is art, isn’t it? Still, on the other hand, water is water! And east is east and west is west and if you take cranberries and stew them like applesauce they taste much more like prunes than rhubarb does. Now, uh, you tell me what you know.

Marry me and I’ll never look at another horse!

I married your mother because I wanted children. Imagine my disappointment when you came along.

Whatever it is, I’m against it.

Outside of a dog, a book is man’s best friend. Inside of a dog, it’s too dark to read.

Quote me as saying I was misquoted.

Phyllis Diller

Phyllis DillerPhyllis. Diller (July 17, 1917 – August 20, 2012[2]) was an American actress and comedienne known for her eccentric stage persona and her wild hair and clothes.

Early life

Diller was born Phyllis Ada Driver in Lima, Ohio, the only child of Frances Ada (née Romshe; January 12, 1881 – January 26, 1949) and Perry Marcus Driver (June 13, 1862 – August 12, 1948), an insurance agent.[3][4]

Diller was a housewife, mother, and advertising copywriter. During World War II, she lived in Ypsilanti, Michigan while her husband worked at the Willow Run Bomber Plant. In the mid-1950s, she made appearances on The Jack Paar Show and was a contestant on Groucho Marx‘s quiz show You Bet Your Life.[8]

Although she made her career in comedy, Diller had studied the piano for many years. She decided against a career in music after hearing her teachers and mentors play with much more skill than she thought that she would be able to achieve. She still played in her private life, however, and owned a custom-made harpsichord.

Along with Lenny Bruce, Bob Newhart, and Mort Sahl, Diller was part of the so-called “New Wave” comedians who began their careers after WWII and had no connections to vaudeville.

I once wore a peekaboo blouse. People would peek and then they’d boo.

When I told Fang I was going to have my face lifted, he said, `Who’d steal it?

I never made `Who’s Who,’ but I’m featured in `What’s That?

You know you’re old when your walker has an airbag.

I was the world’s ugliest baby. When I was born, the doctor slapped everybody.

I have so many liver spots, I ought to come with a side of onions.

Think of me as a sex symbol for men who just don’t give a damn.

They say housework can’t kill you, but why take the chance?

I became a stand-up comedienne because I had a sit-down husband.

My vanity table is a Black & Decker workbench

The only thing domestic about me is I was born in this country

I have so many liver spots, I ought to come with a side of onions

Think of me as a sex symbol for men who just don’t give a damn

The best contraceptive for old people is nudity.

Will Rogers

Will RogersWilliam Penn Adair “Will” Rogers (November 4, 1879 – August 15, 1935) was an American cowboy, vaudeville performer, humorist, social commentator and motion picture actor. He was one of the world’s best-known celebrities in the 1920s and 1930s.

Known as “Oklahoma‘s Favorite Son,” [1] Rogers was born to a prominent Cherokee Nation family in Indian Territory (now part of Oklahoma). He traveled around the world three times, made 71 movies (50 silent films and 21 “talkies“),[2] wrote more than 4,000 nationally-syndicated newspaper columns,[3] and became a world-famous figure. By the mid-1930s, Rogers was adored by the American people. He was the leading political wit of the Progressive Era, and was the top-paid Hollywood movie star at the time. Rogers died in 1935 with aviator Wiley Post, when their small airplane crashed in Alaska.[4]

Rogers’ vaudeville rope act led to success in the Ziegfeld Follies, which in turn led to the first of his many movie contracts. His 1920s syndicated newspaper column and his radio appearances increased his visibility and popularity. Rogers crusaded for aviation expansion, and provided Americans with first-hand accounts of his world travels. His earthy anecdotes and folksy style allowed him to poke fun at gangsters, prohibition, politicians, government programs, and a host of other controversial topics in a way that was readily appreciated by a national audience, with no one offended. His aphorisms, couched in humorous terms, were widely quoted: “I am not a member of an organized political party. I am a Democrat.” Another widely quoted Will Rogers comment was “I don’t make jokes. I just watch the government and report the facts.”

“Even if you are on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.”

So live that you wouldn’t be ashamed to sell the family parrot to the town gossip.

Don’t gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don’t go up, don’t buy it.

Diplomacy is the art of saying ‘Nice doggie’ until you can find a rock.

If stupidity got us into this mess, then why can’t it get us out?

Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects.

Everything is funny as long as it is happening to Somebody Else.

I’m not a member of any organized political party, I’m a Democrat!

The more you read and observe about this Politics thing, you got to admit that each party is worse than the other. The one that’s out always looks the best.

Half our life is spent trying to find something to do with the time we have rushed through life trying to save.

“We can’t all be heroes because somebody has to sit on the curb and clap as they go by.”

 

George Burns

George burnsGeorge Burns (January 20, 1896 – March 9, 1996), born Nathan Birnbaum, was an American comedian, actor, and writer.

He was one of the few entertainers whose career successfully spanned vaudeville, film, radio, and television. His arched eyebrow and cigar smoke punctuation became familiar trademarks for over three quarters of a century.

At the age of 79, Burns’ career was resurrected as an amiable, beloved and unusually active old comedian in the 1975 film The Sunshine Boys, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. He continued to work until shortly before his death, in 1996, at the age of 100.

Burns quit school in the fourth grade to go into show business full-time. Like many performers of his generation, he tried practically anything he could to entertain, including working with a trained seal, trick roller skating, teaching dance, singing, and adagio dancing in small-time vaudeville. During these years, he began smoking cigars and later in his older years was characteristically known as doing shows and puffing on his cigar.[5]

He adopted the stage name by which he would be known for the rest of his life. He claimed in a few interviews that the idea of the name originated from the fact that two star major league players (George H. Burns and George J. Burns, unrelated) were playing major league baseball at the time. Both men achieved over 2000 major league hits and hold some major league records.

He normally partnered with a girl, sometimes in an adagio dance routine, sometimes comic patter. Though he had an apparent flair for comedy, he never quite clicked with any of his partners, until he met a young Irish Catholic lady in 1923. “And all of a sudden,” he said famously in later years, “the audience realized I had a talent. They were right. I did have a talent—and I was married to her for 38 years.”  Her name was Gracie Allen.

 

Sincerity is everything. If you can fake that, you’ve got it made.

 

“First you forget names, then you forget faces. Next you forget to pull your zipper up and finally, you forget to pull it down.”

 

I love to sing, and I love to drink scotch. Most people would rather hear me drink scotch.

 

I smoke 10 to 15 cigars a day, at my age I have to hold on to something.

 

Bridge is a game that separates the men from the boys. It also separates husbands and wives.

 

Everything that goes up must come down. But there comes a time when not everything that’s down can come up.

 

Smartness runs in my family. When I went to school I was so smart my teacher was in my class for five years.

 

“A good sermon should have a good beginning and a good ending, and they should be as close together as possible.”

 

“Happiness? A good cigar, a good meal, a good cigar and a good woman, or a bad woman; it depends on how much happiness you can handle.”

 

I can’t understand why I flunked American history. When I was a kid there was so little of it. Don’t stay in bed, unless you can make money in bed. “

 

When I was young I was called a rugged individualist. When I was in my fifties I was considered eccentric. Here I am doing and saying the same things I did then and I’m labeled senile.”

 

“Actually, it only takes one drink to get me loaded. Trouble is, I can’t remember if it’s the thirteenth or fourteenth.”

 

Happiness is having a large, loving, caring close-knit family in another city.

 

There are two kinds of cruises – pleasure and with children. “

 

Do you know what it means to come home at night to a woman who’ll give you a little love, a little affection, a little tenderness? It means you’re in the wrong house.”

 

If you live to the age of a hundred you have it made because very few people die past the age of a hundred.

Actually, it only takes one drink to get me loaded. Trouble is, I can’t remember if it’s the thirteenth or fourteenth.

 

By the time you’re eighty years old you’ve learned everything. You only have to remember it.

 

 It’s hard for me to get used to these changing times. I can remember when the air was clean and sex was dirty.

 

Old age is when you resent the swimsuit issue of Sports Illustrated because there are fewer articles to read.

 

Happiness is a good martini, a good meal, a good cigar and a good woman… or a bad woman, depending on how much happiness you can stand.

 

Too bad that all the people who know how to run the country are busy driving taxicabs and cutting hair.

 

When Jack Benny has a party, you not only bring your own scotch, you bring your own rocks.

 

Finally…one liners from assorted comics

“Instead of getting married again, I’m going to find a woman I don’t like and just give her a house,” – Lewis Grizzard

“The problem with the designated driver program, it’s not a desirable job. But if you ever get sucked into doing it, have fun with it. At the end of the night, drop them off at the wrong house.” – Jeff Foxworthy

“See, the problem is that God gives men a brain and a penis, and only enough blood to run one at a time.” – Robin Williams

“If a woman has to choose between catching a fly ball and saving an infant’s life, she will choose to save the infant’s life without even considering if there is a man on base.” Dave Barry

“Relationships are hard. It’s like a full time job, and we should treat it like one. If your boyfriend or girlfriend wants to leave you, they should give you two weeks’ notice. There should be severance pay, and before they leave you, they should have to find you a temp.” – Bob Ettinger

“My Mom said she learned how to swim when someone took her out in the lake and threw her off the boat. I said, ‘Mom, they weren’t trying to teach you how to swim.”‘ – Paula Poundstone

“A study in the Washington Post says that women have better verbal skills than men. I just want to say to the authors of that study: Duh.” – Conan O’Brien

“Why does Sea World have a seafood restaurant?? I’m halfway through my fishburger and I realize, Oh my God…. I could be eating a slow learner.” – Lynda Montgomery

“The day I worry about cleaning my house is the day Sears comes out with a ride-on vacuum cleaner.” – Roseanne Barr

“I think that’s how Chicago got started. A bunch of people in New York said, “Gee, I’m enjoying the crime and the poverty, but it just isn’t cold enough. Let’s go west.’” – Richard Jeni

“If life was fair, Elvis would be alive and all the impersonators would be dead.” -Johnny Carson

“Sometimes I think war is God’s way of teaching us geography.” – Paul Rodriguez

“My parents didn’t want to move to Florida, but they turned sixty, and that’s the law.” – Jerry Seinfeld

“In elementary school, in case of fire you have to line up quietly in a single file line from smallest to tallest.  What is the logic? Do tall people burn slower?” – Warren Hutcherson

“Bigamy is having one wife too many. Monogamy is the same.” – Oscar Wilde

“Marriage is a great institution, but I’m not ready for an institution yet.” -Mae West

“Suppose you were an idiot… And suppose you were a member of Congress…But I repeat myself.” – Mark Twain

“Our bombs are smarter than the average high school student. At least they can find Kuwait.” – A. Whitney Brown

“Ah, yes, divorce……., from the Latin word meaning to rip out a man’s genitals through his wallet.” – Robin Williams

“Women complain about premenstrual syndrome, but I think of it as the only time of the month that I can be myself.” – Roseanne Barr

“Women need a reason to have sex. Men just need a place.” – Billy Crystal

“You can say any foolish thing to a dog, and the dog will give you a look that says, ‘My God, you’re right! I never would’ve thought of that!’” -Dave Barry

“We have women in the military, but they don’t put us in the front lines. They don’t know if we can fight or if we can kill. I think we can. All the general has to do is walk over to the women and say, ‘You see the enemy over there? They say you look fat in those uniforms.’” -Elayne Boosler

“If you can’t beat them, arrange to have them beaten.” – George Carlin

“When I die, I want to die like my grandfather who died peacefully in his sleep. Not screaming like all the passengers in his car.” – Unknown

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Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just email me bob@baronson.org and ask for a copy of “Life, Pass it on.”  This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. 

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

The Future Of Organ Transplants — No Waiting!


Since the National Organ Transplant Act (NOTA) went into effect in 1984 we have had a shortage of transplantable organs and there doesn’t seem to be any way we will ever not have a shortage as long as we depend on altruistic donation of “natural” organs.
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There are two ways to end the transplantable organ shortage.  One is to prevent organ damage by living healthier lives and the other is to find the means to develop and provide artificial organs which can be mechanical, biological or a combination of the two.
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Popular Science  magazine has been around as long as I can remember and has always fascinated me with its reports on astonishing achievements in science and technology.  The information below comes from one of their issues.  Read these stories with the expectation that a future where there is no waiting for a transplant is possible.  If these reports are accurate the days of organ shortages could be numbered and we will be able to put a stop to the ever increasing number of people who die waiting for an organ transplant. .
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Video: The Doctors Who Made the No-Pulse Heart

              By Jeremiah Zagar                  Posted 02.29.2012 at 2:04 pm                  9
       

Heart Stop Beating is a three-minute documentary film about the no-pulse, continuous-flow artificial heart, which Dan Baum writes about in our Future of Medicine issue. It tells the story of Billy Cohn & Bud Frazier, two visionary doctors from the Texas Heart Institute, who in March of 2011 successfully replaced a dying man’s heart with the device they developed, proving that life was possible without a pulse or a heart beat.

Feature

No Pulse: How Doctors Reinvented The Human Heart

      This 10,000-rpm, no-pulse artificial heart doesn’t resemble an organic heart–and might be all the better for it
              By Dan Baum                  Posted 02.29.2012 at 12:13 pm                  37 Comments
       

Meeko the calf stood nuzzling a pile of hay. He didn’t seem to have much appetite, and he looked a little bored. Every now and then, he glanced up, as though wondering why so many people with clipboards were standing around watching him.

Fourteen hours earlier, I’d watched doctors lift Meeko’s heart from his body and place it, still beating, in a plastic dish. He looked no worse for the experience, whisking away a fly with his tail as he nibbled, demonstrably alive—though above his head, a monitor showed a flatlined pulse. I held a stethoscope to his warm, fragrant flank and heard, instead of the deep lub-dub of a heartbeat, what sounded like a dentist’s drill or the underwater whine of an outboard motor. Something was keeping Meeko alive, but it was nothing like a heart.

Japanese Researchers Create a Pituitary Gland From Scratch in the Lab

              By Clay Dillow                  Posted 11.10.2011 at 11:08 am                  10 Comments
       

The thing about growing working organs in the lab is that the whole enterprise is completely mind-blowing. Yet we just keep doing it, and so we keep blowing minds. The latest: a team of researchers at Japan’s RIKEN Center–the same group who earlier this year engineered a mouse retina that is the most complex tissue ever engineered–have now derived a working pituitary gland from mouse stem cells.

Feature

State of the Bionic Art: The Best Replacements for My Flimsy Human Parts

      In the event of some horrible accident, which bionic parts would I want replacing my own?
              By Dan Nosowitz                  Posted 08.23.2011 at 2:00 pm                  5 Comments
       

We cover biomedical science and engineering a lot, and sometimes I get to wondering: if I was rebuilding my own flimsy, flesh-based body–presumably because I’d had some ghastly dismembering, eviscerating accident–and replacing my limbs, joints, senses, and organs with the most futuristic, top-of-the-line bionics, what would I get? Would I want an artificial lower leg that sprinters use in Olympic-level races, or a motorized leg that can climb a slope as well as a natural leg? I gathered a list of 15 bionic body parts that I’d want to wear, or have installed.

Click to launch a tour of the body parts I’d want in the event of an accident.

A New Artificial Lung Can Breathe Regular Air Rather Than Purified Oxygen

              By Clay Dillow                  Posted 07.26.2011 at 5:06 pm                  10 Comments
       

Researchers in Cleveland have built an artificial lung that is so efficient it can breathe regular air rather than the pure oxygen required by current artificial lungs. The technology makes possible the idea of a man-made lung that is far more portable–and possibly implantable–for the nearly 200 million people suffering from some degree of lung disease.

Lab Builds a Fully Functioning Artificial Small Intestine

              By Rebecca Boyle                  Posted 07.06.2011 at 11:56 am                  5 Comments
       

California researchers have created a tissue-engineered small-scale small intestine in mice, a breakthrough for regenerative medicine and a step toward growing new intestines for humans. The process re-creates all the layers of cells that make up a functioning intestine.

Diabetes Researchers Report New Steps Towards the First Artificial Pancreas

              By Rebecca Boyle                  Posted 06.27.2011 at 1:43 pm                  2 Comments
       

Private companies and hospital researchers are increasingly making strides toward developing an artificial pancreas, supplanting insulin injections and pinpricks for patients with diabetes. Such a system would mimic the functions of a healthy pancreas, delivering insulin and monitoring blood sugar according to a computer’s careful calculations.

This Lung-On-A-Chip Is The First Lab-Ready Mini-Organ to Be Used in Drug Research

              By Victor Zapana                  Posted 10.08.2010 at 11:15 am                  5 Comments
       

This ersatz lung, no bigger than a multivitamin, could represent a new pharmaceutical testing method. On it, researchers have created an artificial alveolus, one of the sacs in the lungs where oxygen crosses a membrane to enter the body’s blood vessels. A polymer sheet that stands in for the membrane is in the blue strip. On one side of the sheet, blood-vessel cells mimic a capillary wall; on the other, lung-cancer cells mimic lung epithelial cells.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers

This List Could SaveYour Life


The 2012 Frankenstorm that started out as hurricane Sandy had a devastating effect on the eastern seaboard of the United States.   In situations like that it is critically important for the sick, elderly and those who are recovering from organ/tissue transplants and other procedures to be specially prepared to provide accurate medical information to emergency responders.

Being prepared for Frankenstorms is essential but mini storms pop up every day.  You never know when for no apparent reason your blood pressure increases dramatically,  you have difficulty breathing, you experience unexplainable weight gain or an angina attack sends you to the emergency room.  When that happens someone is going to ask what meds you are on, how often you take them, their dosage, contact information for your medical team and insurance info.  Under pressure and when sick it is not uncommon to forget important information.  That’s why I developed this list.   If you have already done what I recommend then review and update your effort.  If you haven’t, do it now while you have the time.

Developing the following information could save your life. There is nothing that can help emergency responders or medical professionals more than providing them with the information suggested below. It is critically important to your life that you take the time right now to do the following:

Information to include on an emergency medical information fact sheet: (sample at the end of this blog)

  • Your full name, address and phone number
  • Next of kin or person(s) who should be notified in case of your emergency including contact information (names, phone, address, email, cell phone)
  • Your Primary care physician name and phone number
  • Specialty care physicians names and numbers
  • The pharmacies you use (include phone numbers)
  • Health insurance company, agent and policy numbers (If on Medicare or Medicaid include that notation with account numbers).
  • Prescription insurance numbers
  • List all the medical conditions for which you are being treated
  • List all surgeries
  • Blood type
  • Write down every medication you take whether by prescription or over the counter.  Include milligrams for each, how often you take them and for which medical condition.

DO NOT GO ANYWHERE WITHOUT AT LEAST A WEEK’S SUPPLY OF YOUR MEDS!   This is especially important during a disaster situation in which transportation, emergency and other services are strained, temporarily unavailable or even suspended.

Some people, transplant patients and recipients in particular must take certain medications to stay alive.  In situations like storms or other natural or unnatural disasters and emergency situations you could be faced with a situation in which you are unable to go home to retrieve your medications and other important belongings.  I suggest you do what I do and that is to keep a shoulder bag packed with your meds and other medical equipment that is within your reach at a moment’s notice. If possible you should also try to stash some cash in your emergency bag.  You might find yourself in a situation where checks and credit cards are useless.

If you have a cell phone and an extra charger, put it in your meds bag.  If you don’t have an extra charger keep the one you have in your meds bag when you are not using it. There is nothing worse than being unable to get to your charger when your phone is going dead.  That phone could be your link to safety and treatment.

If you wear a medical necklace or bracelet, make sure it is up to date and accurate.  If you don’t wear one and have time, get one.

When you have completed the medical emergency list (it should all fit on one sheet of copy paper) make two or three copies, fold them carefully and put them in your purse or wallet.  Emergency medical people can be of the most help if they are aware of your medical history, current medications and other treatments you may be getting.  Having that list in your possession and providing it to medical experts could save your life.  While you may know all of this information, do not depend on your memory.  One omission could prove to be catastrophic.  You must also remember to update the list every time you get a new medication, quit using one, or have any change in your medical condition.

A separate list should be developed for your personal use.  It should include phone numbers of emergency services you might need and iportant family and friend contacts you might need (include cell phone numbers and email addresses).

Sample Medical Info Sheet to Carry With You

HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

Best Hospital USA  August 21 2007  Immunosuppressed

John Doe

Birth date 2-17-1950

9180 orchard lane Anycity, USA

Home 555-555-5555  Cell phone 555-555-5555

SS # 555-55-5555

Spouse; Jane Doe; Cell phone 555-555-5555

Physicians:

Primary, Dr.Sawbones Anycity USA.  Address, phone numbers

Transplant Pulmonologist,  Dr. Breatheasy best clinic USA. 
Address, phone numbers

Transplant Cardiologists, Dr. Heartthump best clinic USA. 
Address, phone numbers

Transplant Coordinator:  Nurse Jane best clinic USA/
Address, phone numbers

 Pharmacy: 

Primary:  Best Pharmacy USS. 
Address, phone numbers

Secondary: Second best pharmacy USA. 
Address, phone numbers

 Health insurance:

Primary Medicare part A, Hospital, part B, Medical. Policy number other info

Secondary, AARP Medicare Supplement .   policy number other info

Medicare part D Prescriptions, AARP Medicare RxEnhanced policy number, other info

 

ALLERGIES:  Penicillin, cats, all seafood/fish, mold, dust.  

 BLOOD TYPE: B Positive

MEDICATIONS

 Heart related medications

  • Anti-rejection Cyclosporine 200 mg  twice a day
  • Anti-rejection — Cellcept  1000 mg twice a day
  • Anti-cholesterol — Prevastatin 20 mg once a day
  • Blood Thinner – Aspirin 81 mg once a day
  • Blood Pressure – Amlodipine Besylate 5 mg twice a day

Other medications

  • Reflux – Omeprozole  (Prilosec) two 40 mg twice a day
  • Thyroid — Levothyroxine .088 MG once a day  (upon arising)
  • Asthma – ProAir albuterol  rescue inhaler as needed
  • COPD – Foradilinhale one capsule twice a day
  • COPD – Spiriva inhale one capsule once a day (upon arising)
  • Depression-Remeron  7.5 –mg once a day-

 Supplements

—  Calcium – 600 mg tablet with Vitamin D twice a day

—  Multi-vitamin– one tablet once a day

Medical Conditions

  • Asthma, hay fever, allergies diagnosed 1951
  • Non-smoker
  • COPD diagnosed October 2000
  • Restless leg syndrome diagnosed 1996
  • Chronic lower back pain

Surgeries

  • Heart transplantBest Hospital 
  • Anywhere USA August 2007
  • Cholecystectomy 1994
  • Total left knee replacement 1998

This list is on my computer and on my cell phone.  Also, I carry two paper copies in my wallet at all times and update it whenever there is a condition, prescription, insurance or medical team change.  Every time I hand this list to ER personnel, or anyone else who asks for it they all say the same thing, “Everyone should carry a list like this it is of invaluable help to us and could save your life.”

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

How Alcohol Can Wreck Your Body


(This report is from the U.K.  You will notice that it refers to “units.”  That’s the same as a about a half of one “shot” of alcohol in the U.S.)  http://tinyurl.com/948cvhs

From heart to liver and brain to kidneys, a night on the tiles makes demands on us that we don’t fully realise. Peta Bee reports

6pm One Unit: It’s been a long day…

BRAIN: From the first sip, alcohol is absorbed into the bloodstream and reaches the brain. Although you won’t be aware of it, there is an impairment of brain function, which deteriorates further the more you drink. Cognitive abilities that are acquired later in life, such as conduct and behaviour, are the first to go. Early on you will experience mild euphoria and loss of inhibition, as alcohol impairs regions of the brain controlling behaviour and emotion. Most vulnerable are the brain cells associated with memory, attention, sleep and coordination. Sheer lack of mass means that people who weigh less become intoxicated more quickly, and women will feel the effects faster than men. This is also because their bodies have lower levels of water.

HEART: Your pulse quickens after just one unit. Alcohol is a vasodilator – it makes the peripheral blood vessels relax to allow more blood to flow through the skin and tissues, which results in a drop in blood pressure. In order to maintain sufficient blood flow to the organs, the heart rate increases. Your breathing rate may also speed up.

8pm Five Units: Whose round is it then?

DIGESTIVE SYSTEM: The Government advises men to drink no more than three to four units a day and women no more than two to three, so after two pints of normal-strength beer (four units) or a large glass of red wine (3.5 units) we have already exceeded our healthy guidelines. The alcohol is absorbed through the stomach and small intestine and if you are not used to it, even small amounts of alcohol can irritate the stomach lining. This volume of alcohol also begins to block absorption of essential vitamins and minerals.

SKIN: Alcohol increases bloodflow to the skin, making you feel warm and look flushed. It also dehydrates, increasing the appearance of fine lines. According to Dr Nicholas Perricone, a dermatologist, even five units will lead to an unhealthy appearance for days.

11pm 10 Units: Sorry, what was your name again?

LUNGS: A small amount of alcohol speeds up the breathing rate. But at this level of intoxication, the stimulating effects of alcohol are replaced by an anaesthetic effect that acts as a depressant on the central nervous system. The heart rate lowers, as does blood pressure and respiration rates, possibly to risky levels – in extreme cases the effect could be fatal. During exhalation, the lungs excrete about 5 per cent of the alcohol you have consumed – it is this effect that forms the basis for the breathalyser test.

1am 15 Units: Let me tell you about my ex…

LIVER: Alcohol is metabolised in the liver and excessive alcohol use can lead to acute and chronic liver disease. As the liver breaks down alcohol, by-products such as acetaldehyde are formed, some of which are more toxic to the body than alcohol itself. It is these that can eventually attack the liver and cause cirrhosis. A heavy night of drinking upsets both the delicate balance of enzymes in the liver and fat metabolism. Over time, this can lead to the development of fatty globules that cause the organ to swell. It is generally accepted that drinking more than seven units (men) and five units (women) a day will raise the risk of liver cirrhosis.

3am 20 Units: Where am I? I need to lie down

HEART: More than 35 units a week, or a large number in one sitting, can cause ‘holiday heart syndrome’. This is atrial fibrillation – a rapid, irregular heartbeat that happens when the heart’s upper chambers contract too quickly. As a result, the heartbeat is less effective at pumping blood from the heart, and blood may pool and form clots. These can travel to the brain and cause a stroke. Atrial fibrillation gives a person nearly a fivefold increased risk of stroke. The effect is temporary, provided heavy drinking is stopped.

BLOOD: By this stage, alcohol has been carried to all parts of the body, including the brain, where it dissolves into the water inside cells. The effect of alcohol on the body is similar to that of an anaesthetic – by this stage, inhibitions are lost and feelings of aggression will surge.

The morning after: Can you please just shut up…

BRAIN: Alcohol dehydrates virtually every part of the body, and is also a neurotoxin that causes brain cells to become damaged and swell. This causes the hangover and, combined with low blood-sugar levels, can leave you feeling awful. Cognitive abilities such as concentration, coordination and memory may be affected for several days.

DIGESTION: Generally, it takes as many hours as the number of drinks you have consumed to burn up all the alcohol. Feelings of nausea result from dehydration, which also causes your thumping headache.

KIDNEYS: Alcohol promotes the making of urine in excess of the volume you have drunk and this can cause dehydration unless extra fluid is taken. Alcohol causes no damage or harm to the kidneys in the short term, but your kidneys will be working hard.

One year on: Where did it all go wrong?

REPRODUCTIVE ORGANS: Heavy drinking causes a drop in testosterone levels in men, and causes testicular shrinkage and impotence. In females, menstrual cycles can be disrupted and fertility is affected. Studies have shown that women who drink up to five units of alcohol a week are twice as likely to conceive as those who drink 10 or more. It is thought it may affect the ability of the fertilised egg to implant.

BRAIN: Over time, alcohol can cause permanent damage to the connection between nerve cells. As it is a depressant, alcohol can trigger episodes of depression, anxiety and lethargy.

HEART: Small amounts of alcohol (no more than a unit a day) can protect the heart, but heavy drinking leads to chronic high blood pressure and other heart irregularities.

BLOOD: Alcohol kills the oxygen-carrying red blood cells, which can lead to anaemia.

CANCER: Excessive alcohol consumption is linked to an increase in the risk of most cancers. Last week, Cancer Research UK warned how growing alcohol use is causing a steep rise in mouth cancer cases.

PANCREAS: Just a few weeks of heavy drinking can result in painful inflammation of the pancreas, known as pancreatitis. It results in a swollen abdominal area and can cause nausea and vomiting.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Hepatitis C — What You Need to Know


More people in the United States now die from hepatitis C each year than from AIDS, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 3.2 million Americans are currently infected with hepatitis C and the really bad news is that most people who have it don’t’ know it.

Let’s start with a definition.

According to the Mayo Clinic Hepatitis C is an infection caused by a virus that attacks the liver and leads to inflammation. Most people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have no symptoms. In fact, most people don’t know they have the hepatitis C infection until liver damage shows up, decades later, during routine medical tests.

Hepatitis C is one of several hepatitis viruses and is generally considered to be among the most serious of these viruses. Hepatitis C is passed through contact with contaminated blood. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hepatitis-c/DS00097

According to the U.S. Centers For Disease Control (CDC) http://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/c/cfaq.htm Hepatitis C is most commonly spread through the use of infected needles. Before 1992, when widespread screening of the blood supply began in the United States, Hepatitis C was also commonly spread through blood transfusions and organ transplants. Now we know that people can become infected with the Hepatitis C virus during such activities as

  • Sharing needles, syringes, or other equipment to inject drugs
  • Needlestick injuries in health care settings
  • Being born to a mother who has Hepatitis C

Less commonly, a person can also get Hepatitis C virus infection through

  • Sharing personal care items that may have come in contact with another person’s blood, such as razors or toothbrushes
  • Having sexual contact with a person infected with the Hepatitis C virus

***Note, the Executive Director at HCVets.com, Tricia Lupole, indicates that the CDC information may be incorrect. She made this comment on our Facebook page.

“HCV by sex is a risk if both partners experience trauma and exchange blood…. the only cells found is seminal fluids are dead cells…. confirmed by many microbiologist. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15128350 There are 100s of studies that show this is the case but it is junk science that reins control of the message to control the funding. Lots of plans to make HCV the fall guy for bad behavior.“

In a second post she went on to say, “Yes, the CDC has quoted the same statement for about 15-20 years now. The study I posted is based on the CDC National Survey. Another sad point, last I checked. Even though we all know better the CDC says that there is not enough evidence to show tattoos are a risk factor.

AMA does not want to regulate tattoo parlors as medical procedures because they are responsible for guidance/ prevention. (The task has been given to OSHA).

Today Ms. Lupole issued this statement:

The Centers for Disease Control federal funding has decreased in recent decades, while there’s been increased demands for vaccination programs; resulting in limited resources for at-risk adults and other mandated priorities. The categorical nature of federal funding for HIV, STD, and viral hepatitis prevention limits the shifting of funds across program lines. In response to these funding woes, the National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention’s (NCHHSTP) captured HCV disease and redesign public health services to fit HIV programs, instead of critical public health needs. It’s important to note that HCV disease was previously integrated into federal research that included its viral family called Flaviviridae, whose members are Yellow Fever and Dengue viruses and transmit disease through mosquitoes. The HCV genome is almost identical to Dengue virus.


NCHHSTP’s Federal mandate is an integration of existing programs with new programs, like Viral Hepatitis, developed to mirror HIV/AIDS management model based on specific risks and disease pathology. STD and Substance Abuse programs associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS received increased attention and funding, blurring the other components of these programs.

Needless to say, NCHHSTP has meet with resistance from advocates and congressional leaders, because of this effort by public health agencies to narrowly define HCV’s pathology.


Today, NCHHSTP spends half the federal resources acquired for HCV to vaccinate patients with both Hepatitis A & B vaccines. The majority of remaining resources are directed at drug and STD intervention and prevention. The STD division must qualify for its share of funding by defining HCV a sexually transmitted disease.


Despite scientific proof that HCV is not an STD, NCHHSTP promotes HCV as an STD based on a handful of studies that bring about scientific uncertainty, working against broader public health threats. Research excluded several methods by which the virus transmits to insure standard elements comply with CDC corporate agreement requirements. Thus… junk science.
Such actions suggests this poor public health response to the HCV Disease epidemic, may be the direct result of a system in disarray – seemingly captured by special interest with legal and political agendas that have negatively influenced the response. The integration approach has created disparities in access to health care and created “social labels” that have fostered discrimination, responsible for the reduction in quality of life.

The enduring legacy of “junk science” and indifference of governments, nonprofits, advocates, political parties or economic elites, have grave and global consequences given the propensity for viral transmission in provider settings as seen in current headlines.

FY 2012 Hepatitis C transmission and prevention: latest news. Massive increase of hepatitis C incidence in HIV-positive gay men in Switzerland 30 August 2012 …http://www.aidsmap.com/Hepatitis-C-transmission-and-prevention/cat/1628/

• FY 2008- No evidence of a HCV epidemic in HIV negative gay men
Dr Turner et al. Data from attendees at a London GUM clinic suggest that there is no increase in HCV infections amongst HIV negative gay men.

• FY 2007- Injection Behavior, Not Sexual Contact, Accounts for Couples’ HCV Risk NEW YORK (Reuters Health) – Injection behavior, rather than sexual contact, accounts for the clustering of HCV virus (HCV) infection in heterosexual couples, according to a report in the June 1st issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

• FY 2004 No Evidence of Sexual Transmission of HCV among Monogamous Couples: Results of a 10-Year Prospective Study The risk of sexual transmission of HCV virus (HCV) infection was evaluated among 895 monogamous heterosexual partners of HCV chronically infected individuals in a long-term prospective study, which provided a follow-up period of 8,060 person-years.

Either way, CDC or not…. junk science remains junk science. Wish the outcry would focus on piercing jewelry or the reuse of razors and personal care items verses a national message about a method that is least as likely as not. This battle over CDC junk science, goes way back and is in memory of many who passed HCV on to family members, while sacrificing pleasures of the mind, body, and soul. As you can imagine, sexual transmission is a constant worry for some. Their partner may catch/transmit this deadly virus through sex, protection or not….. yet… turn right around and share razors and other items as such.  Especially the economically depressed populations.”

Most recently, though, we’ve identified another way people may become infected and through no fault of their own. Recently in a New Hampshire hospital an employee who was a drug addict and who also had Hepatitis C was found to be injecting himself with filled syringes meant for patients, refilling the syringes with a harmless liquid non-pain killer and then replacing the needles and syringes on the tray to be used again. Below is one of the original stories on this 2012 incident.

‘Serial infector’ accused of spreading hepatitis at NH hospital

U.S. Attorney’s Office | ASSOCIATED PRESS

CONCORD, N.H. — Authorities in at least six states are investigating whether a traveling hospital technician accused of infecting 30 people with hepatitis C in New Hampshire also exposed earlier patients to the liver-destroying disease.

David Kwiatkowski, a former technician at Exeter Hospital, was arrested Thursday morning at a Massachusetts hospital where he was receiving treatment. Once he is well enough to be released, he will be transferred to New Hampshire to face federal drug charges, said U.S. Attorney John Kacavas, who called Kwiatkowski, 33, a “serial infector” who worked in at least half a dozen states.

Authorities believe Kwiatkowski stole drugs from a hospital operating room in another state, but they declined to name any of the other states, saying only that they are not clustered in one part of the country. They would not say in what hospital Kwiatkowski was being treated at so he couldn’t be contacted for comment.

This story brought new attention to hospital policies on infection control, narcotics control and patient safety and has had ripple effects across the nation if not around the world.

So…the next question is, how serious is hepatitis C? Chronic Hepatitis C is a serious disease that can result in long-term health problems, including liver damage, liver failure, liver cancer, or even death. It is the leading cause of cirrhosis and liver cancer and the most common reason for liver transplantation in the United States. Approximately 15,000 people die every year from Hepatitis C related liver disease.

What are the long-term effects of Hepatitis C?

Of every 100 people infected with the Hepatitis C virus, about

  • 75–85 people will develop chronic Hepatitis C virus infection; of those,
    • 60–70 people will go on to develop chronic liver disease
    • 5–20 people will go on to develop cirrhosis over a period of 20–30 years
    • 1–5 people will die from cirrhosis or liver cancer

The CDC strongly suggests that all baby boomers born since 1945 should get tested for Hepatitis C. http://tinyurl.com/8tg28x6Baby boomers account for 2 million of the 3.2 million Americans infected with the blood-borne liver-destroying virus. CDC officials believe the new measure could lead 800,000 more boomers to get treatment and could save more than 120,000 lives.

“The CDC views hepatitis C as an unrecognized health crisis for the country, and we believe the time is now for a bold response,” said Dr. John W. Ward, the CDC’s hepatitis chief.

Several developments drove the CDC’s push for wider testing, he said. Recent data has shown that from 1999 and 2007, there was a 50 percent increase in the number of Americans dying from hepatitis C-related diseases. Also, two drugs hit the market last year that promise to cure many more people than was previously possible.

What are the Symptoms of Hepatitis C?

Here’s what WEBMD says. http://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/hepc-guide/hepatitis-c-symptoms

Most people who are infected with hepatitis C-even people who have been infected for a while-usually don’t have symptoms.

If symptoms do develop, they may include:

  • Fatigue.
  • Joint pain.
  • Belly pain.
  • Itchy skin.
  • Sore muscles.
  • Dark urine.
  • Jaundice, a condition in which the skin and the whites of the eyes look yellow.

A hepatitis C infection can cause damage to your liver (cirrhosis). If you develop cirrhosis, you may have:

  • Redness on the palms of your hands caused by expanded small blood vessels.
  • Clusters of blood vessels just below the skin that look like tiny red spiders and usually appear on your chest, shoulders, and face.
  • Swelling of your belly, legs, and feet.
  • Shrinking of the muscles.
  • Bleeding from enlarged veins in your digestive tract, which is called variceal bleeding.
  • Damage to your brain and nervous system, which is called encephalopathy. This damage can cause symptoms such as confusion and memory and concentration problems.

What Treatment is Available?

So if you have Hepatitis C, then what? There are a number of options and there might even be a cure before too long. Standard state of the art treatment today for Hepatitis C is with Peginterferon and Ribavirin which achieves a “sustained response” up to 54% of people, which means that the virus has been eliminated from their blood after stopping treatment. People with hepatitis C types 2 and 3 have sustained response rates of about 80%; people with type 1 have rates of up to 50%.

While hepatitis C treatment has come a long way, there are still drawbacks. For a person who’s newly diagnosed, a 54% cure rate may not sound great. After all, it means that about one out of two people won’t respond to treatment.

Also, hepatitis C treatment is less effective in some populations. For reasons that no one understands yet, African-Americans are less likely to benefit from treatment. And the treatments may not be safe for people with other medical conditions — such as kidney failure, heart disease, or pregnancy. Interferon can also be expensive; according to the American Academy of Family Physicians, it can cost $6,000 per year. http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=52451

It is important to note again, that while liver transplants can be very helpful to Hepatitis C patients, the procedure is not a cure but rather a delaying action and an effective one. There is some evidence that a transplant from a living donor to a patient who has been receiving the Interferon treatment could represent a cure. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3kOElXz0vVg

A Possible Medicinal Cure

Gilead Science is performing multiple studies to test an experimental drug, but the trial that is possibly the most intriguing looks at a combination therapy that rolls two medicines into a single pill. Gilead hopes to advance tests of its lead hepatitis drug GS-7977 in a combination with another company medicine, GS-5885.

Bristol Myers Squibb had a promising drug but clinical trials resulted in some negative results so the company has sent the project back to the drawing board. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/24/business/bristol-myers-ends-work-on-hepatitis-c-drug.html?_r=2&

Finally, Gilead Sciences, mentioned earlier, has a drug that combined with another from Bristol Myers Squibb could be a cure, at least clinical trials seem to offer that indication but the two companies, according to Hepatitis C activist Margaret Dudley can’t seem to cooperate. She is circulating a petition to get the “cure” on the market. http://hepc-cured.com/

October is National Liver Awareness month. We hope you have found these blogs helpful and offer these links for further information.

http://www.liverfoundation.org/

http://www.nlfindia.com/index.asp

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/liver-problems/DS01133

http://tinyurl.com/92bjlup U.S. Government Link

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Prison’s Deadliest Inmate, Hepatitis C, Escaping


In our continuing series on Hepatitic C we offer this story from NBC and the Associated Press  3/14/2007

Public-health workers warn of looming epidemic of ‘silent killer’

Marcio Jose Sanchez  /  AP

VACAVILLE, Calif.  — The most dangerous thing coming out of prison these days may be something most convicts don’t even know they have: hepatitis C.

Nobody knows how many inmates have the disease; by some estimates, around 40 percent of the 2.2 million in jail and prison are infected, compared with just 2 percent of the general population.

Eventually, when they are released, medical experts predict they will be a crushing burden on the health care system, perhaps killing as many people as AIDS in years to come. At the same time, they will be carriers, spreading the disease.

Hepatitis C can be treated, but many prisons do not test for it. Among the reasons: Budgets are tight, and treatment is expensive. So prison officials close their eyes to the gathering emergency and pass it along to the outside world.

“Right now there’s a golden opportunity to bring solutions to this problem before it hits,” said Dr. John Ward, director of viral hepatitis at the National Center for HIV/AIDS at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.

Hepatitis C is already the most common disease of its sort in the United States — a chronic, life-threatening, blood-borne infection. It is most commonly linked to infected needles used for drugs, though prison tattoos and body piercing with non-sterile equipment are also risky.

‘Silent killer’
What makes this virus particularly insidious is that as many as half of the people who have hepatitis C don’t even know they have it. The “silent killer,” already considered epidemic by the World Health Organization, often remains dormant for decades.

Some of the infected are lucky: One in five people who get hepatitis C will clear it out of their system naturally. But without treatment, one in four will suffer liver failure or develop liver cancer. Last year liver cancer was the only one of the top 10 fatal cancers in this country to increase, in large part because of hepatitis C.

More than $1 billion is already spent each year on this country on hepatitis C, and those costs are expected to soar unless prevention and treatment are expanded.

Without those changes, researchers project that liver-related deaths will triple from around 13,000 in 2000 to 39,000 by 2030. It’s also estimated that 375,000 Americans with hepatitis C will develop cirrhosis by the year 2015.

Anita Taylor, 48, is already there, in end-stage liver disease. Taylor speaks very slowly and moves with care. She often finds that she can’t say the words she wants to — they just won’t come out. Her body hurts most of the time. Her nose bleeds a lot.

‘Doctor gave me a death sentence’
A mother of two and former heroin addict, Taylor said she learned she had hepatitis C when she was jailed in Nevada in 1991 for being under the influence of drugs.

“They tested me and told me I had hepatitis C. They didn’t tell me there was a treatment and a cure,” she said. “And I didn’t know to ask.”

Taylor’s experience is not unusual.

“The doctor gave me a death sentence, recalls Leslie Czirr, a 36-year-old parolee. “He told me, ’There’s no cure for this and you will die from it unless you are hit by a truck first,”’

Czirr learned she had hepatitis C during a prenatal examination in 1996, at a time when she wasn’t in prison. Czirr has been arrested 10 times for drug possession and served almost eight years in prison on various drug possession and dealing charges.

She has started to suffer exhaustion, brain fog and aches. She recently enrolled in a county program to be treated — treatment, she said, she was denied at California’s Norco State Prison.

“I asked and asked, but they barely want to give you a Motrin,” she said. “I really want to get well, not just for myself, but so I’m not putting anyone else at risk.”

Limited studies indicate that fewer than 10 percent of prisoners who have contracted hepatitis C are treated. The reason vary. Medical staff have other priorities, and not all are well-informed about the disease. Prisoners with short sentences are often excluded because they won’t be able to complete treatment, and drug addicts who are inclined to return to risky behavior are often turned away because it is assumed they will simply reinfect themselves.

No funding for treatment
Usually, though, it comes down to money. Prison officials say that even if they wanted to provide the treatment, it is extremely expensive — about $9,500 per patient per year — and no federal funds have been earmarked to pay for it.

“It’s a hard sell to convince taxpayers why additional resources should be spent on the health care of the incarcerated when there are a lot of people who aren’t incarcerated who don’t have adequate health care,” said Dr. Joseph Bick, chief medical officer at the California Medical Facility at Vacaville.

Many of the inmates in Vacaville’s hospice unit — reserved for those given six months or less to live — are dying from hepatitis C-related ailments. Bick said half of the prison’s 3,200 inmates have a history of having been infected with hepatitis C, and at any given time about 40 of those men are receiving the intensive drug treatment to cure it.

“I’m pretty sure this is how I got it,” said Anthony Harris, an inmate at Vacaville. He rubbed his forearm hard, as if trying to remove the prison tattoo bearing his children’s names.

Harris, 51, is a former barber serving a life sentence for second-degree murder. In 2003, a doctor at another prison told him he had Hepatitis C; he researched the disease in the prison library and has sought treatment ever since.

“They gave me shots for Hep A and B, got rid of them. I’d like to get rid of the C too,” he said. “I’m entitled to that. But some docs will give you the treatment and others won’t. I keep making appointments. I keep asking.”

The course of treatment can take a year, and involves taking pills twice a day and weekly injections. Side effects are like those associated with chemotherapy — nausea, exhaustion, depression, debilitating aches and pains — and the cure only works about half the time.

But Bick said the high cost of treating prisoners for hepatitis C is a bargain compared to the bill that would come due if these cases are left untreated. “It’s a tremendous opportunity for us to have an impact on the larger health of the community,” he said.

Dr. Lynn Taylor, an assistant professor of medicine at Brown University’s medical school, agrees that prison is “perhaps one of the best setting for treatment of high-risk individuals.”

‘Window of opportunity’ for public-health efforts
“Prison can be a window of opportunity to reduce the reservoir of infection,” she said.

But there are no federal rules about testing and treating hepatitis C. Federal guidelines, issued by the CDC in 2003, said correctional facilities should “become part of prevention and control efforts in the broader community.” But they don’t recommend screening for all inmates.

Instead, the CDC urged medical staff to ask new inmates about their risk factors, and only those prisoners who seem likely to be exposed should undergo screening, which costs $5 to $10.

The CDC guidelines fell short, said Dr. Josiah Rich, a professor at Brown who directs the university’s Center for Prisoner and Human Rights. Rich’s studies confirm that convicted criminals are almost always willing to be tested for hepatitis C, but will often lie to prison authorities about their past drug use.

“We already know that more than one in three people coming through corrections has Hep C, so by definition everyone coming in is high risk. It’s absurd that they’re not testing everyone,” he said.

Rich concedes that testing every inmate will “jack up costs” for prisons.

“An individual is going to say, ’Hey, you tested me, you said I was positive, and now I want to be treated, and I’m going to sue you if I don’t get treated,”’ he said.

Lawsuits on the rise
Lawsuits are, indeed, on the rise.

The first significant case came in 1999, when officials at the Luther Luckett Correctional Complex in La Grange, Ky., refused to allow inmate Michael Paulley access to free hepatitis C treatment. Paulley, who was serving a 25-year sentence for rape and burglary, sued and won.

But the treatment came late and he died in 2004, the year he would have been eligible for parole. The litigation prompted broader testing and treatment in Kentucky, but Paulley’s physician, Dr. Bennet Cecil, a Louisville, Ky.-based hepatitis C specialist, said prisoners still die “all the time” for untreated hepatitis C.

“I think it’s immoral if a country, a state a society is going to incarcerate somebody and then deny them necessary medical care. I think that’s an outrage,” he said.

Prisons in at least a dozen states — Alabama, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New York, Oklahoma and Virginia — are being sued over failure to treat hepatitis C.

But it’s tough going, said Oregon civil rights attorney Michelle Burroughs. Although she’s won a settlement that mandated testing for at risk inmates and treatment for those who are eligible, five of the 10 inmates she’s representing in a class-action lawsuit have died while the litigation proceeds.

5-year wait
“It’s appalling, horrendous, horrifying. Prisoners wait five years just to be evaluated,” she said.

Rep. Barbara Lee, D-Calif., recently reintroduced legislation that would mandate prison testing and treatment of hepatitis C. Earlier similar proposals in recent years have failed.

“The plain fact is that prisoners do not stay in prison. With more than 90 percent of incarcerated persons returning to their communities, it is clear that when a prisoner is infected, we are all affected,” Lee said.

In North Dakota, it didn’t take legislation, court orders or new regulations to prompt medical services director Kathleen Bachmeier to begin screening every inmate for hepatitis C after a methamphetamine epidemic tripled her state’s prison population in about a decade. As the intravenous drug addicts arrived, so did the hepatitis C.

“It became obvious to me that these people are going to cost the state a lot of money if we don’t do something about it,” she said.

North Dakota now treats anyone who meets certain medical criteria, whose sentence is long enough to complete the course of treatment and who is willing to try to quit using drugs.

“We look at this as a huge public health initiative,” she said.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Hepatitis C — No One is Immune Everyone is Affected


More people in the United States now die from Hepatitis C each year than from AIDS  according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   More than 3.2 million Americans are currently infected with Hepatitis C and the really bad news is that most people who have it don’t’ know it.

In coming days I will publish more information and heart wrenching stories about Hep C and the patients it affects, the lives it wrecks and what it costs our society in both human lives and dollars…it is astounding.

Hep C is a disease of the liver that society likes to keep in the shadows because of some of the ways in which it is contracted, but we cannot begin to deal with a disease if it is kept secret and treated as though it was sinful and dirty.  It isn’t.  The people aren’t and they need our help and our compassion.

Hepatitis C can be treated and there are some exciting possibilities on the horizon but now there is no available cure,  not even a liver transplant is a cure because Hepatitis C is systemic.

To get us started on the road to understanding please view this video.  It says more in a few minutes than anything I can write at this moment.  Please share the video with others and then watch this space for more.  I fully intend to say a lot more on the subject of this disease that affects so many of my friends.

Thank you  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J4TCo-qVoKk

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Cystic Fibrosis — The Victims are Heroes


CF is Cystic Fibrosis. Most of us know nothing about it even though we are familiar with the term. CF is a devastating disease causing constant discomfort and requiring intense and frequent treatment.

A CF patient must start every day with an extended and sometimes agonizing period of therapy. Often that therapy has to be repeated several times during the day. I’ve known several CF patients and to me they are special because of the heroic efforts they must put forward every day just to be able to approach normal functioning. Most diseases are difficult to manage but CF patients need to get physical in order to function. They are amazing people.

CF is one of those diseases in which a Lung Transplant is sometimes necessary and quite helpful but the procedure does not cure the disease. We’ll discuss that option more later.

I don’t have CF but I do have Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) so I can at least relate to the part of CF that causes difficult breathing.  The Clinical description of CF sounds bad enough but until you’ve experienced what it’s like to struggle for air it Is difficult if not impossible to understand.  One CF patient said, “It feels like you’re breathing through a small straw all the time.”

Difficult breathing alone is a terrible affliction but CF is much more than difficult breathing, it affects almost the entire body.   This definition from Medicine Net seems to sum up the disease in graphic, therefore understandable terms (http://www.medicinenet.com/cystic_fibrosis/article.htm).

“Cystic fibrosis mostly affects the lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, sinuses, and sex organs. Mucus is a substance made by the lining of some body tissues. Normally, mucus is a slippery, watery substance. It keeps the linings of certain organs moist and prevents them from drying out or getting infected. However, if you have cystic fibrosis, your mucus becomes thick and sticky.

The mucus builds up in your lungs and blocks your airways—the tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. The buildup of mucus makes it easy for bacteria to grow. This leads to repeated, serious lung infections. Over time, these infections can severely damage your lungs.

The thick, sticky mucus also can block tubes, or ducts, in your pancreas. As a result, the digestive enzymes that your pancreas makes can’t reach your small intestine.

These enzymes help break down the food that you eat. Without them, your intestines can’t fully absorb fats and proteins. This can cause vitamin deficiency and malnutrition because nutrients leave your body unused. It also can cause bulky stools, intestinal gas, a swollen belly from severe constipation, and pain or discomfort.

Cystic fibrosis also causes your sweat to become very salty. As a result, your body loses large amounts of salt when you sweat. This can upset the balance of minerals in your blood and cause a number of health problems. Examples include dehydration (a condition in which your body doesn’t have enough fluids), increased heart rate, tiredness, weakness, decreased blood pressure, heat stroke, and, rarely, death.” The Clinical description of CF sounds bad enough but until you’ve experienced what it’s like to struggle for air it Is difficult if not impossible to understand.

The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (www.cff.org/home/) Says this about the disease.

“Cystic fibrosis is an inherited chronic disease that affects the lungs and digestive system of about 30,000 children and adults in the United States (70,000 worldwide.   An additional ten million more—or about one in every 31 Americans—are carriers of the defective CF gene, but do not have the disease. CF is most common in Caucasians, but it can affect all races”.

In the 1950s, few children with cystic fibrosis lived to attend elementary school. Today, advances in research and medical treatments have further enhanced and extended life for children and adults with CF. Many people with the disease can now expect to live into their 30s, 40s and beyond.”

The sad fact of life for the approximately 30,000 Americans who suffer from cystic fibrosis (CF) is that they must get their chests pounded at least twice a day.

Chest pounding, also known as chest percussion, loosens the thick mucus that forms in the lungs of CF patients, allowing them to cough or sneeze up mucus and consequently breathe more easily. Chest pounding is a primary therapy for treating the disease.

To achieve chest percussion, CF patients today have two main choices: they can have a respiratory therapist perform the chest-pounding or they can purchase a CF “vest.” The vest, once the patient puts it on, uses air waves to shake the whole upper body, helping to loosen mucus in the lungs.

In this video a young woman not only demonstrates the vest but has some fun with it.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NEBM7ediRic&feature=related

Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis

From the Mayo Clinic

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cystic-fibrosis/DS00287/DSECTION=symptoms

Respiratory signs and symptoms
The thick and sticky mucus associated with cystic fibrosis clogs the tubes that carry air in and out of your lungs. This can cause:

  • A persistent cough that produces thick spit (sputum) and mucus
  • Wheezing
  • Breathlessness
  • A decreased ability to exercise
  • Repeated lung infections
  • Inflamed nasal passages or a stuffy nose

Digestive signs and symptoms
The thick mucus can also block tubes that carry digestive enzymes from your pancreas to your small intestine. Without these digestive enzymes, your intestines can’t fully absorb the nutrients in the food you eat. The result is often:

  • Foul-smelling, greasy stools
  • Poor weight gain and growth
  • Intestinal blockage, particularly in newborns (meconium ileus)
  • Severe constipation

Frequent straining while passing stool can cause part of the rectum — the end of the large intestine — to protrude outside the anus (rectal prolapse). When this occurs in children, it may be a sign of cystic fibrosis. Parents should consult a physician knowledgeable about cystic fibrosis. Rectal prolapse in children may require surgery.

Currently, there is no cure for cystic fibrosis. However, specialized medical care, aggressive drug treatments and therapies, along with proper CF nutrition, can lengthen and improve the quality of life for those with CF.

Each day most people with CF:

  • Take pancreatic enzyme supplement capsules with every meal and      most snacks (even babies who are breastfeeding may need to take enzymes).
  • Take multi-vitamins.
  • Do some form of airway clearance at least once and sometimes up to four      or more times a day.
  • Take aerosolized      medicines—liquid medicines that are made into a mist or aerosol and then inhaled through a nebulizer.

Because CF is a complex disease that affects so many parts of the body, proper care requires specialized knowledge. The best place to receive that care is at one of the more than 110 nationwide CF Foundation-accredited care centers

Lung transplants

While lung transplants are an option for CF patients, the procedure will not cure the disease, because the defective gene that causes it is in all of the cells in the body, not just in the lungs. At this time, scientists are not able to “fix” genes permanently but they are working on it. . While a transplant does give a person with CF a new set of lungs, the rest of the cells in the body still have CF and may already be damaged by the disease. Further, organ rejection is always possible and drugs that help prevent organ rejection can cause other health problems.

Cost and available help

As is the case with most chronic diseases treating CF can become very expensive but there are programs that exist to help patients with these challenges.  Many people with CF use Cystic Fibrosis Services, Inc., a specialty pharmacy that is a subsidiary of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. It provides access to CF drugs, offers patient assistance programs and works to help resolve complex insurance issues. CF Services is a participating provider with more than 5,000 insurance plans and nearly 40 state and federally funded programs. Visit www.cfservicespharmacy.com or call (800) 541-4959.

In 2008, the CF Foundation launched the Cystic Fibrosis Patient Assistance Program (CFPAF) as a nonprofit subsidiary. The CFPAF helps people with CF (who qualify) who need FDA-approved medication or paired drug-delivery devices for the nebulized treatment of CF-related pulmonary disease, or an FDA-approved medication for the treatment of pancreatic insufficiency related to CF. Case managers at the CFPAF help people with CF with ways to reduce out-of-pocket costs for CF drugs. All funds distributed by the CFPAF are provided by grants from drug manufacturers. Visit http://www.cfpaf.org or call (888) 315-4154.

CF drug companies often offer a range of patient assistance programs — from giving out samples of new CF products, to providing free nutritional supplements, to accepting voucher payments for CF drugs. Find out more information in the Foundation’s archived Web cast entitled, ” Patient Advocacy: Issues and Answers for CF.”

Suggested resources

Cystic Fibrosis is a terrible disease and while progress is being made in treating it, lifespans for its victims are still relatively short.   If you’d like to help fund research or offer assistance in other ways contact the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation http://www.cff.org/GetInvolved/ManyWaysToGive/MakeADonation/

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Election 2012 — Senior Citizen Transplants & Healthcare Coverage to Diminish


This is a presidential election year and because of the debate over Medicare, Obamacare and the federal deficit Senior Citizens had better sit up and take notice.  Regardless of who wins big changes are in store that will affect the lives of current and future senior citizens.  While this blog usually confines itself to organ donation/transplantation issues the all-encompassing nature of the healthcare debate caused us to broaden our perspective. From our vantage point this is how the Medicare/Obamacare/deficit debate shakes out.

When it comes to health care in America we have the known (Medicare as it currently stands and the Affordable Care Act or “Obamacare) and we have the unknown (Romney/Ryan – roughly outlined plan)

Here’s what we know we have now and what we can expect.

  • If you are 65 years old and need an organ transplant Medicare will pay 80% of the cost (your supplemental will pick up the rest) and will pay the full cost of all of your ant- rejection drugs as long as you live.
  • If you are officially disabled, regardless of age, Medicare will offer the same transplant and anti-rejection coverage.
  • If you are under 65 but suffer from Kidney Disease Medicare will cover 80% of the cost of a transplant and will fully cover anti-rejection drugs for 36 months.  Medicare will also cover the cost of dialysis until you get a transplant
  • If you qualify Medicaid, which is mostly federally funded but state run, will cover transplants and the cost of medication but with recent cuts many people will not qualify for transplants.
  • Under “Obamacare” If you are covered by Medicare Part D (that’s prescription coverage) your costs will keep going down until they disappear almost completely in 8 years (2020) that’s when the donut hole closes.
  • 14.3 million Senior citizens in America have already received important preventive benefits under The Affordable Care Act including an annual checkup, without paying any deductibles or co-pays. Also millions of Americans are getting cancer screenings, mammograms, and other preventive services at no charge, but the status quo cannot last.  Even if Medicare/Obamacare survives it will have to change, there will be cuts because the cost of providing care is just too high.  Changes could include a later starting date for Medicare to age 66 or 67; more limited coverage; lowering coverage from 80 to 70%; higher premiums; fewer drugs covered under Part D to name just a few.
  • Still unknown is what change will be made in organ allocation policy.  Under consideration is a measure that would allocate organs by potential long term survivability. That simply means that age will become more of a factor.  Under this practice younger organs would go to younger people because both the organs and the recipient have longer expected life spans.  For example, if an organ came from someone who was 40 years old it might be expected that it would survive another 25 years.  If a potential recipient was 65 and had an expected life span of 75 the available organ might instead go to someone younger, even though the younger person might not be as sick.  A very tough ethical question being asked in light of the on-going organ shortage.

Romney/Ryan are promising to “Change the system for the better.” Unfortunately we don’t know what that is.  What we do know is that both men have committed to repealing the Affordable Care Act.  If they do that, the donut hole will open again, maybe bigger than ever, preventive services will disappear and many senior citizens may be faced with making horrible choices like, eating instead of taking medications.

The GOP ticket is also committed to further spending cuts and if past performance is an indication Medicaid will get cut again, which may mean that there will be few if any Medicaid financed organ transplants.

While neither of the GOP team has said a word about Transplant coverage one certainly gets the feeling that everything to do with health care is on the table.  Here’s the Romney plan according to the Los Angeles Times.

“Romney has said he would waive as much of the 2010 law as he could through his authority as president, and push Congress to repeal the rest. In its place, he would seek a premium-support system like the one Ryan proposed for those becoming eligible for Medicare in 2022 and beyond. Private insurers would compete with Medicare in a new marketplace, or exchange, with each offering coverage roughly equivalent to what Medicare offers. Instead of offering seniors Medicare coverage, the government would provide an insurance subsidy equal to the second-least-expensive offering in the exchange. Seniors who didn’t want that particular coverage could use the subsidy to buy the less expensive insurance and keep the change, or sign up for more expensive coverage and pay the difference out of pocket.”  http://tinyurl.com/8jl5xpb

A new report, (August 24, 2012) from the Center for American Progress finds that the Romney/Ryan proposal to transform Medicare’s guaranteed benefit into a “premium support” structure for future retirees could increase costs by almost $60,000 for seniors reaching the age of 65 in 2023. http://tinyurl.com/9rh2pyo  The Romney/Ryan campaign says this report is inaccurate.

Here’s what bothers me about the Romney/Ryan plan.  It turns nearly everything over to the private sector which, when combined with the Republican penchant for de-regulation, threatens the elderly with minimal coverage for maximum cost for a minimum of people.

Perhaps Romney/Ryan will come up with a more detailed proposal that will offer more certainty, but this sounds too much like a dismantling of Medicare with the result being that seniors will just buy insurance in the private marketplace like everyone else.  Most importantly, though, it appears that Obamacare offers a more certain possibility of organ transplant coverage than does Romney/Ryan which makes no mention of the procedure.  Additionally, if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, pre-existing conditions will return which would automatically rule out anyone who needs a transplant.  And…along those same lines, I can’t think of a single senior citizen who doesn’t have at least one pre-existing condition that would prevent insurance coverage.

On balance, both options leave a lot to be desired for seniors, but repeal of the Affordable Care Act would be a disaster for many of us, especially when faced with the ever increasing cost of drugs, and the senior citizen need for more medications as we age.  Re-opening the donut hole is just not an acceptable option for us.

There is still plenty of time between now and Election Day for Romney/Ryan to clarify their plan and to specifically mention organ and tissue transplant coverage but until they do this blog will play it safe and endorse the present flawed but more understandable Medicare/Obamacare system.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Critical Information On Managing Your Medications


Reprinted and reformatted from WikiHow

With Additions by Bob Aronson

Have you just started a new medicinal regimen that requires you to take pills every day? Remembering to take your medication every day can be a chore, but it is also very important for your health. If you’re forgetful or simply have too many medications to track, then maybe this guide can help you remember to get the job done.

Start using a calendar. You can purchase a paper calendar and hang it in your room and teach yourself to look at it every day, making and leaving notes accordingly. You can also search through free electronic calendars on the Internet or use calendar software that may have come with your computer. Some of these allow you to add notes and automatically send you reminders by email or by SMS (i.e. text messaging).

Set visual reminders.

  • Put the medication close to something you need to deal with on a daily basis anyway. For example, if you take your medication in the morning, make sure that before going to bed at night, you place it next to the coffee pot, if you make coffee in the morning. Or, you can attach your medication bottle or pill box to your toothbrush with Velcro.
  • Make it part of your routine. If you take it every morning, make it a habit to take it as soon as you step out of the shower, or as soon as you get out of bed.
  • You can purchase sticky notes to leave in your kitchen, your car, or anywhere that you frequently visit. For medication that is stored in the fridge, you should paste a post-it note on the fridge door (or on your coffee pot) that says Take Pills.
  • Remember medication that needs to be taken with a meal, by keeping it right on the table, in front of the place that you eat.
  • If you are on your computer often, you might create a text file on your desktop that contains a list of things that you need to do. You can search the Internet for “electronic” sticky notes that you can place directly on your desktop, rather than purchasing paper ones. These programs will often allow you to set timers and reminders directly to the notes to flash or emit sounds accordingly.
  • If you have a complex regimen, write a list with the medication, time and date and tape the list to the mirror in your bathroom. You can also print this on a grid and check off each medication after you take it.
  • Set an auditory reminder. This is a common and fairly effective way to remind yourself to take your medicine. Most cell phones have an alarm function that allows you to set a “daily” alarm time where it rings. Choose a tone that will remind you that you need to take your medicine. If you do not own a cell phone, you might set your alarm clock to go off at a particular time each day for the same effect. Another alternative is to buy a digital watch and set the alarm to go off as many times per day as you need to take medication. A small digital kitchen timer with a numeric keyboard can be useful. Be sure to get one that can be set for hours, not just minutes and seconds. As soon as the alarm goes off, immediately take your medication to reinforce the habit. Saying “Oh, I’ll do it in a few minutes” can lead to repeated forgetfulness and defeat the purpose of having an alarm.
  • Sort your medication. Place all your medications, including your daily dose of vitamins on your kitchen counter. As you take one pill, close the bottle, and place it to the left of the counter, making two piles. Do the same for each pill you take. Remember that the ones you need to take are in front of you. The ones you have already taken are to the left of you. After you are finished taking all your pills for the day, place all those on the left hand side back into the kitchen cabinet. Now you will know that all of your pills have been taken. Pre-sorting the pills into a plastic container designed for this purpose (a pill box or medicine box) is another way to avoid taking the same medication twice by accident. If that compartment is empty, you know you took the meds. Pill sorters come in different sizes and different colors. Aim to have enough to sort two weeks of meds at a time.
  • Adopt a “divide and conquer” strategy. In other words, take half of your medicine and keep it in a place other than your household, such as your office at work. If you happen to forget to take your medicine in the morning, you can easily access your medicine at work.
  • Be mindful of your medicine’s storing conditions, especially if you plan to keep your pills in your car’s glove box on a hot summer day.
  • Get another person to remind you. Have a friend or loved one to remind you to take your medicine, or to ask you if you remembered to take your medicine.

Tips

  • Use your phone calendar to set recurring reminders daily. It’s a more subtle way to be reminded. If you use your company phone/Outlook, make sure you mark the appointment as “private” and keep the reminder description generic to protect your privacy

Be careful when deciding on reminders. If you get too comfortable with them (such as a note on your fridge or by your pill box) you may be more likely to overlook it or ignore it.

  • Not all medication is available or legal in all countries so you should check ahead. Any medication that may have a controlled substance may not be allowed in some countries so make sure you bring your prescription bottle and if possible a photocopy of your physician’s prescription.
  • If you choose to set an alarm on your cell phone, be sure that it is a tone that you can easily associate with taking your medicine, so that you do not become too accustomed to hearing a soft tone. Or, if all else fails, set it to the same tone as your normal ring tone.
  • Remember to take your medication with you when you go on holiday. When you pack your toothbrush, pack the medications you take also.  IMPORTANT!  NEVER CHECK MEDICATION WITH YOUR BAGGAGE.  ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MEDS WITH YOU IN CASE YOUR BAGGAGE GETS LOST.
  • If on vacation, pack your original, pharmacy-labeled medication bottles or keep a detailed list in your purse or wallet.  I have attached a sample list to the end of this blog.
  • Your meds list should also include critical medical information like insurance, physicians and clinics, and medical conditions. If it happens that you need emergency medical care, this will help the care providers to quickly determine what medications you take and how and why you take them, should you not be able to remember them or not speak for yourself. It is difficult, time-consuming and sometimes impossible for health care providers to identify unlabeled pills. For the same reason, do not dump different medications into the same bottle.
  • Before you go on a long vacation, ask your doctor to give you an extra prescription for your pills, so that if you run out, lose them, or spill them, you can have the prescription filled at any drugstore.
  • If you are taking medication for a serious condition such as heart disease, wear a Medical Alert tag, necklace or bracelet listing the name(s) of your illness and the medications you use to treat it/each. Also list any potentially hazardous interactions and allergies.
  • If one or more of your medications causes photo sensitivity, be sure to put on sunscreen before leaving your house, no matter what it looks like outside; you’d be surprised how little light is required to get a full-blown sunburn!

Warnings

  • Be mindful of making a mental note to yourself when you take your medicine. Forgetting to take your medication is one thing, doubling your dosage because you forgot that you’d already taken your medication for today is another. You could make a box next to your “Remember Pills”-note, tick it off when you’ve taken it.
  • If you do forget to take a dose, read the instructions that come with your medication carefully. Don’t assume that you should take your dose anyway- although this is the case for most, it can be different for others. If you have trouble reading, ask the pharmacist to explain the dosage directions.
  • Before leaving the pharmacy, check to make sure that the pills in the bag are the pills that you use. Pharmacists make mistakes also.
  • When leaving your medicine bottles around to remind you to take them, be careful if you have children so you do not leave the pills in a easy spot for a child to grab.
  • Be aware that certain prescription medications have a high potential for addiction or abuse. If you find yourself taking more of a medication than prescribed, call your doctor immediately to talk about the change.
  • Some medications, such as those classed as controlled substances, may not be appropriate to leave around the house. Place them in a locked cabinet, box or drawer, and do not move them from one building to the next. Try to not let others know that you are on such medications and avoid taking them in public. It’s not uncommon for people to steal certain medications, either to abuse themselves or to sell to others with similar intent.
  • It’s a Federal offence to transfer a controlled substance to anyone other than the person to whom it was prescribed (you). If you do wind up victim of a theft, report it immediately to avoid potential prosecution.
  • Some medications have ‘black box warnings’. This means that when taken incorrectly, or by those with certain conditions, fatalities may arise. Place these and other such medications in a safe location and call your doctor right away if you think you might have accidentally taken more than prescribed.
  • Sometimes the pharmacist gives out a stranger’s prescriptions by accident, read the label carefully.

Sample Medical Info Sheet to Carry With You

HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

Best Hospital USA

Immunosuppressed

John Doe

Birth date 2-17-1950

9180 orchard lane anycity, USA

Home 555-555-5555  Cell phone 555-555-5555

SS # 555-55-5555 Spouse; Jane Doe; Cell phone 555-555-5555

Physicians:

Primary, Dr.Sawbones Anycity USA

Transplant Pulmonologist,  Dr. Breatheasy best clinic USA

Transplant Cardiologists, Dr. Heartthump best clinic USA

Transplant Coordinator:  Nurse Jane best clinic USA

Pharmacy: 

Primary:  Best Pharmacy USS

Secondary: Second best pharmacy USA

Health insurance:

Primary Medicare part A, Hospital, part B, Medical

Secondary, AARP Medicare Supplement .  

Medicare part D Prescriptions, AARP Medicare RxEnhanced

Allergies:Penicillin, cats, all seafood/fish, mold, dust. 

Blood Type: B Positive

Heart related medications

  • Anti-rejection Cyclosporine 200 mg  twice a day
  • Anti-rejection — Cellcept  1000 mg twice a day
  • Anti-cholesterol — Prevastatin 20 mg once a day
  • Blood Thinner – Aspirin 81 mg once a day
  • Blood Pressure – Amlodipine Besylate 5 mg twice a day

Other medications

  • Reflux – Omeprozole  (Prilosec) two 40 mg twice a day
  • Thyroid — Levothyroxine .088 MG once a day  (upon arising)
  • Asthma – ProAir albuterol  rescue inhaler as needed
  • COPD – Foradilinhale one capsule twice a day
  • COPD – Spiriva inhale one capsule once a day (upon arising)
  • Depression-Remeron  7.5 –mg once a day-

Supplements

—  Calcium – 600 mg tablet with Vitamin D twice a day

—  Multi-vitamin– one tablet once a day

Medical conditions

  • Asthma, hay fever, allergies diagnosed 1941
  • Non-smoker
  • COPD diagnosed October 2000
  • Restless leg syndrome diagnosed 1996
  • Chronic lower back pain

Surgeries

  • Heart transplantBest Hospital 
  • Anywhere USA August 2007
  • Cholecystectomy 1994
  • Total left knee replacement 1998

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

  • You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

 

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