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We Are Too Fat and It’s Killing Us. Obesity — America’s Number One Health Threat.


evolution of obesityBy Bob Aronson

Obesity may well be the greatest threat to public health ever, at least that’s the conclusion of a good many national and international health agencies ranging from the American Centers For Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to the World Health Organization (WHO).

Too many people see obesity as a cosmetic problem and dismiss it as such.  It isn’t.  bad haircutA bad haircut is a cosmetic problem but a bad haircut never killed anyone.  Obesity can and does with great regularity.  Obesity is not about how you look, it is about slow suicide.

Before we get into the details it is important to define obesity.  According to the medical profession men are obese if fat makes up more than 25% of their body weight. Women are obese at more than 30% body fat.  In order to measure the percentage of body fat health professionals use a formula called the Body Mass Index (BMI).  It is based on height and weight (there is some controversy about the accuracy of BMI in some professional circles but that determination is best made by experts in the field and not by this author.  This link will give you more information http://healthland.time.com/2013/08/26/why-bmi-isnt-the-best-measure-for-weight-or-health/

The obesity epidemic is a fact, though, and will continue to be a problem regardless of how the BMI debate is settled).

  • A BMI of 18.5 to 24.9 is normal weight.bmi index
  • 25,0 ti 29.9 is overweight
  • 30.0 to 39.9 is obese
  • 40.0 and above is extremely obese

You can determine your BMI in private just by clicking on either of the two links below.

  1. If you want a simple BMI calculator click here. http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmicalc.htm
  2. If you want a BMI that measures more and is more accurate, click here. http://www.healthstatus.com/calculate/body-fat-percentage-calculator

Studies indicate that nearly one in five US deaths is associated with obesity, which is nearly three times higher than previous estimates.  It is now thought that 34% of American adults are obese. Another 34% are overweight.

The preceding information is disturbing enough but even more upsetting is that fact that 17 percent of American children are obese. Another 15% are overweight.  That means that a third of our children have weight problems and you can bet that they will carry those problems into adulthood.

So – why worry about all of this, why is it important?  It is important because obesity kills. It kills just as sure as a 45 caliber bullet can kill, only it usually takes longer and the death can be painful and far more costly.  Bullets are usually mercifully quick.  Death by obesity is slower, much slower.  It creeps up on you, destroys your organs, debilitates, disables, depresses and costs far more than you can afford and then kills you anyway.  It is a long, hard and painful existence, but it can be avoided.  It’s not easy, but it can be avoided.

I am writing about obesity because it is a clear and present danger to everyone.  According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) we run the risk of contracting any or all of the following when we ignore warnings about overweight and obesity..

Health Risks of Overweight and Obesity?

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/obe/risks

Being overweight or obese isn’t a cosmetic problem. These conditions greatly raise your risk for other health problems (this list has been edited.  To read all of it in detail click on the link above).

Coronary Heart Disease

As your body mass index rises, so does your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). CHD is a condition in which a waxy substance called plaque (plak) builds up inside the coronary arteries and reduces blood flow to the heart thereby causing a heart attack or heart failure.

High Blood Pressureblood pressure cuff

Blood pressure is the force of blood pushing against the walls of the arteries as the heart pumps blood. If this pressure rises and stays high over time, it can damage the body in many ways.  Your chances of having high blood pressure are greater if you’re overweight or obese.

Stroke

Earlier we talked about a buildup of plaque in your arteries. Well, it can rupture, causing a blood clot to form and if that clot is close to the brain it can cause a stroke. The risk of having a stroke rises as BMI increases.

Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which the body’s blood sugar, level is too high. In type 2 diabetes, the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. Diabetes is a leading cause of early death, CHD, stroke, kidney disease, and blindness. Most people who have type 2 diabetes are overweight.

Metabolic Syndrome

Metabolic syndrome is the name for a group of risk factors that raises your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke.

A diagnosis of metabolic syndrome is made if you have at least three of the following risk factors:

  • A large waistline. This is called “having an apple shape.” Having extra fat in the waist area is a greater risk factor for CHD than having extra fat in other parts of the body, such as on the hips.
  • A higher than normal triglyceride level (or you’re on medicine to treat high triglycerides).
  • A lower than normal HDL cholesterol level (or you’re on medicine to treat low HDL cholesterol).
  • Higher than normal blood pressure (or you’re on medicine to treat high blood pressure).
  • Higher than normal fasting blood sugar (or you’re on medicine to treat diabetes).Being overweight or obese raises your risk for colon, breast, endometrial, and gallbladder cancers.Osteoarthritis is a common joint problem of the knees, hips, and lower back. The condition occurs if the tissue that protects the joints wears away. Extra weight can put more pressure and wear on joints, causing pain or broken bones.Sleep apnea is a common disorder in which you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep.Reproductive Problems
  • A person who has sleep apnea may have more fat stored around the neck. This can narrow the airway, making it hard to breathe.
  • Sleep Apneasleep apnea
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Cancer
  • Obesity can cause menstrual issues and infertility in women.

Dementia

  • Recent studies show that obesity is linked with brain atrophy. This increases the risk of dementia as people get older.

I think we have pretty well established that obesity can cause irreparable physical harm, but it can cause mental and emotional problems that is just as painful.  For example:

  • Obesity makes life more difficult. It is harder to tie your shoes, fit in an airplane seat, or find a mate.
  • Obese people are stigmatized by society. Many normal weight people look down on obese people.
  • Employers discriminate against obese people in hiring, pay increases, and promotions.
  • Obesity is a cause of depression in women.
  • Obese children rate their quality of life as being even lower than do children who have cancer.

Space does not allow for us to delve farther into adolescent or child obesity but it is a significant problem and we will tackle it in another separate blog.

So now we know about obesity and its effects.  Now let’s look into how we get that way and what can be done about it.

The problem and the solution to it seem simple.  All you have to do to maintain a healthy weight is to burn up as many calories as you take in. That’s not easy because some people burn calories at a different rate than others. The problem is that few pay any attention to the number or nature of the calories they consume.  Furthermore, even fewer people pay any attention to the trade-off of burning them up.

The secret to maintaining a healthy BMI is to be calorie conscious.  You should know what you are consuming and how much exercise or activity it takes to burn it off.  For example, if you go to a professional football game and eat just one of their hotdogs you will consume about 250 calories.  In order to get rid of 250 calories you would need to walk for about an hour (see calorie/exercise ing caloriescalculator and other calculators here  https://www.fitwatch.com  If this particular link does not satisfy you just Google calorie calculators and you’ll find dozens of free apps for your phone, tablet, PC or Mac).

Obesity does not come on overnight.  No one goes to bed fit and in good shape and awakens as a morbidly obese person.  The process is gradual and can be stopped at any point along the way if you do two things; 1) Eat right and 2)exercise.  That’s all, eat right and exercise.

Most of us live very busy lives and feel as though we don’t have time to cook so “Fast food” becomes a way of life, but there are faster healthy foods that you can prepare for yourself that won’t add inches to your waistline.  Try some of these or google “Healthy nutritious and fast food recipes” and you are bound to find something that appeals to you.  This site, for example, is very helpful. http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/collections/quick_healthy_dinner_recipes

Nearly everyone I know has some kind of a sweet tooth. Some have it more than others but almost everyone likes a little “Sweet” now and then and a little might be fine but we just don’t seem to be able to handle just a little.  Well, you’d better learn how.sugar

In September 2013, a bombshell report from Credit Suisse’s Research Institute brought into sharp focus the staggering health consequences of sugar on the health of Americans. The group revealed that approximately “30%–40% of healthcare expenditures in the USA go to help address issues that are closely tied to the excess consumption of sugar.”  The figures suggest that our national addiction to sugar runs us an incredible $1 trillion in healthcare costs each year. The Credit Suisse report highlighted several health conditions including coronary heart diseases, type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which numerous studies have linked to excessive sugar intake.

According to Medicine Net http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=56589         Each American consumes one hundred and fifty-six pounds of added sugar.  That’s 31 five pound bags of sugar according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). Imagine it: 31 five-pound bags for each of us.

In the U.S. diet, the major source of “added sugar” — not including naturally occurring sugars, like the fructose in fruit — is soft drinks. They account for 33% of all added sugars consumed, says Kristine Clark, PhD, RD, a spokeswoman for the Sugar Association. Clark is also director of sports nutrition in the athletic department of Penn State University.

Anne Alexander, editorial director of Prevention and author of The Sugar Smart Diet provided this explanation of what sugars can do to your body.

 Glucose

  • It seeps through the walls of your small intestine, triggering your pancreas to secrete insulin, a hormone that grabs glucose from your blood and delivers it to your cells to be used as energy.
  • But many sweet treats are loaded with so much glucose that it floods your body, lending you a quick and dirty high. Your brain counters by shooting out serotonin, a sleep-regulating hormone. Cue: sugar crash.
  • Insulin also blocks production of leptin, the “hunger hormone” that tells your brain that you’re full. The higher your insulin levels, the hungrier you will feel (even if you’ve just eaten a lot). Now in a simulated starvation mode, your brain directs your body to start storing glucose as belly fat.
  • Busy-beaver insulin is also surging in your brain, a phenomenon that could eventually lead to Alzheimer’s disease. Out of whack, your brain produces less dopamine, opening the door for cravings and addiction-like neurochemistry.
  • Still munching? Your pancreas has pumped out so much insulin that your cells have become resistant to the stuff; all that glucose is left floating in your bloodstream, causing prediabetes or, eventually, full-force diabetes.

Fructose

  • It, too, seeps through your small intestine into the bloodstream, which delivers fructose straight to your liver.
  • Your liver works to metabolize fructosei.e., turn it into something your body can use. But the organ is easily overwhelmed, especially if you have a raging sweet tooth. Over time, excess fructose can prompt globules of fat to grow throughout the liver, a process called lipogenesis, the precursor to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
  • Too much fructose also lowers HDL, or good cholesterol, and spurs the production of triglycerides, a type of fat that can migrate from the liver to the arteries, raising your risk for heart attack or stroke.
  • Your liver sends an S.O.S. for extra insulin (yep, the multi-tasker also aids liver function). Overwhelmed, your pancreas is now in overdrive, which can result in total-body inflammation that, in turn, puts you at even higher risk for obesity and diabetes Robert Lustig, an endocrinologist from California gained national attention after a lecture he gave titled “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” went viral in 2009.  www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

Fruit and Sugar substitutes

There are two questions associated with sugar that must be addressed, one has to do with the safety of sugar substitutes and the 2nd with fruit.

Stay away from sugar but eat more fruit! Huh?  Fruit is loaded with sugar so how can it possible be good for you?  Here is the definitive answer. EAT FRUIT! And here’s why.  While fruit does contain sugar it is digested and burned farfiber filled fruit differently than is the sweetener used in soft drinks, donuts, candy bars and cakes.  I could provide you with thousands of words on why fruit is good for you but you don’t need that.  What you need to know is this: it is almost impossible to over eat fructose by eating fruit.  If you need more details and the research behind the facts click on this link http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/07/31/making-the-case-for-eating-fruit/?_r=0 Fruit can also help keep us from overeating according to Dr. David Ludwig, the director of the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center at Boston Children’s Hospital.  He says, “Unlike processed foods, which are usually digested in the first few feet of our intestines, fiber-rich fruit breaks down more slowly so it travels far longer through the digestive tract, triggering the satiety hormones that tend to cluster further down the small intestines.”

That brings us to the issue of artificial sweeteners.  There’s still a lot we don’t know about them and research is still being done but the scientific community generally believes that they are not harmful.  TStevia and other sweetenershey urge caution, though, and say that if you must have something sweet, go with the artificial variety preferably Stevia.  But, the jury is still out and its best to avoid all sweeteners if possible.  You can find more details in the report from CNN’s Dr. Sanjay Gupta.  http://www.everydayhealth.com/sanjay-gupta/myths-and-facts-about-sugar-substitutes.aspx

While there’s no medical evidence these sugar substitutes are dangerous, a recent study suggests they don’t guarantee weight loss either. Researchers from the Yale University School of Medicine found that eating foods with artificial sweeteners when we’re hungry or tired increases the likelihood of choosing higher-calorie foods later on.

“We still don’t fully understand the long-term effects of artificial sweeteners,” says Alexandra Kaplan Corwin, a registered dietician in the division of pediatric endocrinology and diabetes at The Children’s Hospital at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. “Though the [U.S. Food and Drug Administration] has said they’re safe and the National Cancer Institute says they don’t cause cancer, we still don’t really know if there are long-term health consequences.”

Conclusion

 We’ve discussed obesity, it’s causes, the dangers of sugar and the advantages of eating more fruit.  Now the ultimate question, if you are obese, how do you lose that excess weight? Most experts will tell you that almost any program will help you lose weight.  The real trick, though, is losing it and keeping it off. It would be quite easy to list a number of diets and let you choose, but that would not be helpful because everyone’s condition is different.  We suggest that your very first step is to talk to your primary care physicians about the options he or she believes best suit you. Your physician knows your medical history and is far better able to make wise recommendations that the writer of a blog.  What I can say without fear of contradiction is that before you take on any weight loss program you must first assess your total medical condition. If you do not you could be headed for trouble. Your doctor will either make diet recommendations or direct you to someone who can.

Chances are that if you read this blog you are have more than a passing acquaintance with the Internet and will continue to do some research on your own on how to get rid of those excess pounds.  Well, we anticipated that and found one link in particular that might offer significant help. http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/index.html  Clicking here will lead you to scores of sites that can help you achieve the weight loss goals you seek. 

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New heart, new life, new man

Feeling better than ever at age 76

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s over 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org.  And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.  You can register to be a donor at http://www.donatelife.net.  It only takes a few minutes.

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A Better Way to Combat Obesity


By Dr. Priscilla Diffie-Couch

Introduction by Bob Aronson

Obesity is an equal opportunity disease.  It is no respecter of age, gender, race or religion.  It is deadly and growing so that it now affects more than a third of U.S. adults (nearly 80 million people).  According to the Obesity Society, 69 percent of American adults are either affected by obesity or having excess weight.  http://www.obesity.org/resources-for/what-is-obesity.htm

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) says the combination of poor diet and physical inactivity cause about 300.000 deaths a year, the second leading cause of preventable death in the U.S.

Obesity puts individuals at risk for more than 30 chronic health conditions including:  type 2 diabetes, high cholesterol, hypertension, gallstones, heart failure, fatty liver disease, sleep apnea, GERD, stress incontinence, heart failure, degenerative joint disease, birth defects, miscarriages, asthma, and numerous cancers.

Priscilla Diffie-Couch E.E.D. has been researching and writing about health issues for over two decades.  Her reporting is factual, objective, helpful and frank. She is a frequent contributor to Bob’s Newheart.

A Better Way to Combat Obesity

By Priscilla Diffie-Couch E.E.D

dead 24 hrs

Obesity is more than an abundance of food and a shortage of exercise.  It is more than the substitution of sugar for fat or the easy access to cheap fast foods.  Few would question the ever-increasing obsession with food or need to get to the root of that problem.  But too few treat obesity as a genuine threat.  Yet what good does it do to make the world safe from terrorism while we watch millions of people being held hostage by food until they eat themselves to death?

obese person on airplaneWhat caused Americans to get so fat?  Research is replete with the absolute proof that eating fat does not cause us to get fat   ( www.wnyc.org/story/eatingfatdoesntmakeusfat).    In fact, we have learned that the introduction of low-fat food into our diet was one of the greatest health mistakes ever made.  We have only learned lately that, with the exception of transfat, fat is not a culprit in causing disease.  On the contrary, when we remove fat from our diet, we deprive ourselves of vital nutrients that prevent disease, in particular, vitamin D ( medicinenet.com/ vitamin_d_deficiency/related…/index.htm ).

A shocking number of diseases are associated with low levels of vitamin D:  Alzheimer’s, dementia, diabetes, fatty liver, high blood pressure, Chron’s disease, allergy, MS, depression, osteopenia, cancer, rickets, cystic fibrosis, celiac disease and obesity itself.  Reliable recent evidence shows that many Americans are short of vitamin D (health.usnews.com/…/many-americans-fall-short-on-their-vitamind).

Making matters worse, obese people do not make as much vitamin D3 in their guts as normal weight people do.  That exacerbates the shortage of vitamin D.  In one study obese subjects had significantly lower basal 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and higher parathyroid hormone concentrations than did age-matched control subjects.  Evaluation of blood vitamin D3 concentrations 24 hours after whole-body irradiation showed that the incremental increase in vitamin D3 was 57% lower in obese than in non-obese subjects (ajcn.nutrition.org/content/72/3/690.abstract).

Besides the fact that low levels of vitamin D contribute to obesity and obesity further reduces levels of vitamin D, we are caught in another vicious cycle.  Omitting fat deprives us of the unequalled satiating power of full-fat foods.  That circles us right back into further weight gain.

Another result compounds the problem.  Food without fat loses much of its flavor.  So food manufacturers fill that void with added sugar and

sugarsalt.  But neither the presence of sugar or salt is independently responsible for the fattening of America.  Our bodies have always been able to tolerate salt and sugar in controlled amounts.  It is the unregulated unparalleled quantities of sugar in our foods–not ingested fat–that turns to fat in the human body.

Upon closer observation, it is not just the quantity of sugar that causes our bodies to lose essential metabolic control.  It turns out that simple carbohydrates in any food form are treated the same as sugar when we ingest them.  Table sugar and white bread work equally efficiently to impair our body’s ability to use insulin.  And that causes constant hunger and disease and bulging bodies.  Bulging bodies crave food.

So someone came up with the brilliant idea of replacing sugar in food and drink.  Along came the introduction of sugar substitutes, possibly the second biggest health mistake ever made.  Recent research strongly suggests that sweeteners cause blood sugar spikes.  (See the study published in Nature, September 17, 2014 “Artificial Sweeteners Induce Glucose Intolerance by Altering Gut Bacteria.”)  The negative consequences are the same–possibly worse.  Drinks sweetened with sugar substitutes have zero calories.  So we happily consume greater quantities of sugar-free food and drink with abandon, never realizing how much this contributes to our weight problem.

That still does not fully explain why we are getting more and more obese as a nation.  Obviously, easy access to abundant food and drink of any whole heaalth sourcekind makes it harder to control our weight.  The super-sizing of everything we eat is now so common that we feel cheated if we are offered what once was a normal sized hamburger or portion of fries.  The original six ounce soda now seems like a drink intended for a small child.  Just as we have readjusted our view of what is overweight because there are so many more overweight people than ever before, we have readjusted our view of portion size.  That results in eating far more calories than ever before.Is quantity then the real culprit in packing on the pounds?  Without a doubt, it is a major contributor to obesity.  A summary reported in April of this year by Whole Health Source charts the rise in calorie intake and its impact on obesity.  “Calorie Intake and the U.S. Obesity Epidemic” points out that Americans increased their total calorie intake by 363 calories a day between 1960 and 2009.  Surprisingly, during this time obesity has trebled yet we have cut our intake of fat from 45% of total calorie to less than 33%.  What is not so surprising is that we now consume mostly simple carbohydrates.  (www.hsph.harvard.educ/nutritionsource/fats-full-story/).

Substituting simple for complex carbohydrates changes the food equation.  What is almosthigh fiber super stars always missing when we eat the wrong foods in any quantity is fiber.  Fiber is a magic agent that prevents sweetened food and drink from causing a sharp insulin spike (www.sharecare.com/health/type-2…/food-and-blood-sugarlevels).  Fiber is the friendly element in food that causes us to detect texture and tricks our stomachs into feeling fuller on less quantity.  We need from 25 to 35 grams of fiber daily.  Yet it impossible to find a single meal when we eat out that offers more than two or three grams of fiber, if that.  Even when we eat at home, we fill our plates with everything but fiber.

Eating to stay slim requires daily monitoring of what we put in our bodies.  It is not easy.  Yet, Americans have continued to search for some simple formula for fighting the fat that creeps on to our bodies more readily with each passing year.  Diet pills don’t work.  Diet plans are a dismal failure.

It goes without saying that Americans are less active now than ever before in history.  The sad fact is that, the obesity on wheelsfatter people are, the harder it is to be active.  Slim people tell fat people to walk.  They can’t.  Many rely on riding on special carts to even be able to navigate through the grocery store.  The amount of effort required to lose only a few pounds causes too many of the overweight and obese simply to give up.

So what is the solution to obesity?  No one seems to know.  Individually, however, I feel certain that we could make a discernible dent in the problem by doing something very simple.  Retrain ourselves and our children to abide by the nutrition rules that worked so well back when obesity was a rare burden.  Every meal should consist of single portions on a 10-inch dinner plate (except for salad) consisting of 30% full fat, 30% protein, and 60%  complex carbohydrates, which contain multiple grams of fiber.  Substantial gains in loss of fatness could be achieved if we asked ourselves before every meal or snack, “Where is the fiber?”

Allowing ourselves and our children dessert only if we followed the rules for healthy eating spelled out above would provide a bonus for maintaining a healthy weight.

But most of us know what we should do individually to avoid getting fat. Having that knowledge has yet to solve the obesity problem.  We have been left alone too long.  Sporadic solutions are not the answer.  Companies that have independently created incentive programs that reward people who lose weight find themselves subject to discrimination lawsuits.

I cringe as I write these words but I have come to believe that we have no choice but to get the government of every nation with an obesity problem directly involved.  Independent drug researchers are never going to discover the magic fat-dissolving pill.  National research agencies must be fully funded to seek causes and solutions for the world-wide obesity malady.  New standards for defining obesity must be based on actual medical outcomes.  Validity of using Body Mass Index or waist circumference for predicting negative health effects must be re-examined and adjusted for age.  Meanwhile, steps need to be taken to implement workable plans to gain a foothold in arresting obesity.  I have never been an advocate of total government intervention.  But, when every possible private option has been exhausted, imposing universal programs may be the only answer.

The government must step up to reduce the burden of being fat.  There are at least 300,000 reasons why.  That is the number of deaths per year in the US estimated to be associated with obesity.  More than 78 million Americans can now be classified as obese.  That is more than the combined populations of California, Texas and New York.  If the current trend continues, by 2030 that number will increase to a shocking 45 to 51% of the population.

Obesity is now the second leading preventable cause of death in our country.  It is linked to sixtydeaths from obesity chronic conditions like diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, osteoporosis, breast cancer and others.  It is now safer to smoke, drink to excess, or be impoverished than it is to be obese.

The fatter we get, the less active we are.  The less active we are, the sicker we get.  The sicker we get, the greater the demand for costly drugs and hospital care and doctor visits. The more we spend on medical care, the more stress we feel.  The more stress we feel, the more we turn to food.  Clearly, the problem of obesity has ballooned into a never-ending cycle.

This cycle is not easily broken.  Sadly, in a routine trip to the grocery store, we can see a disturbing number of people so obese that they could have been found only in “freak” shows fifty years ago.  We are no longer surprised to see a rack of size 5X clothing on display at Wal-Mart.  Ironically, the fatter we get, the fewer of us see ourselves as fat.  By current definition, an ordinary person six foot tall who weighs 221 pounds is classified as obese.  But because one in three Americans is now overweight, our perception of “fatness” has changed.  Fat people look at fatter people with disgust.  Other people are fat.  We just need to lose a few pounds. 

Losing pounds is not easy.  Studies show that most of us underestimate our calorie intake and overestimate our level of activity. Fat people sit on the sidelines while others ride bikes, hit obese chldrentennis balls and swim.  Fat kids watch TV and sit in front of computers while their slimmer counterparts run and play.  The multi-billion dollar diet industry has failed.  The misguided low-fat diet craze has failed.  The only success story we can point to is the supersizing of America.

What will it take to break this supersizing cycle?  Thirteen years later, we are still aware of the changes in our lives prompted by the attack on 9-11-2001.  If terrorists had killed 300,000 Americans that day—as obesity does each year–it is hard to imagine the extent of government intervention in our lives aimed at protecting our safety and well-being.

What will it take to wake us up?  Obesity now claims more lives than illicit drug use, car and plane wrecks combined.  In 2009 alone, obesity cost our nation $152 billion.  These enormous costs are borne by us all. They show no signs of abating.  Individual efforts to curb obesity have failed.  That leaves little choice but to turn to the government for solutions.

The specific role of government should take the form of incentives, not mandates like those used in national security.  Medical research needs to be funded to provide clear guidance for designing programs that can break the cycle of disease and disorders resulting from being fat.  Government must first focus on finding out why we are fat and then on prevention.  Providing specific incentives associated with being fit not fat must be incorporated into the infrastructure of our lives.  A massive campaign must be mounted to make the public aware of these new programs.

Such government programs should begin early in our public schools.  Required physical education classes should be reinstated from primary through the twelfth grade.  Physical fitness should be given prestigious treatment among honors awarded to students of all ages.  Teachers in every field of study should be rewarded for creating curricula that require students to get up move around the classroom.  School systems should receive monetary incentives for the number of students they graduate that are not fat.  Government recognition of healthy fit kids should once again become a central concern of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Nutrition courses should be required at all grade levels.  Schools should be rewarded for increasing the number of students who stay on campus and eat nutritious meals.  Healthy snack breaks should be a part of daily school ritual at every level so that teachers can verbally reward students who actually eat their fruit.  Tax payer money should not be spent on school lunch programs that compete with fast-food fare.  Advertisements of non-nutritious foods—as has been done with alcoholic beverages and cigarettes–must be banned from television and certainly in the schools.  Deals between schools and the soft drink industry must be ended.

Programs for adults must also be designed to provide incentives for not being fat.  Providing discounts for drugs required because of conditions caused by obesity is counterproductive.  Doing so not only fails to discourage weight gain, but it also ignores what studies show to be the number one medicine to prevent and treat common diseases.  It does not come in a bottle.  It is called exercise.  Exercise, we now know, is superior tTop 20 exercise benefitso Prozac for treating mild to moderate depression.  Exercise can reverse certain kinds of heart disease and do away with the need for medicine to control blood sugar.  Abundant research shows that even light weight-lifting can enable elderly people to get up out of their wheel chairs and walk after only few weeks.   A proper diet and exercise can free many people with high blood pressure from medication.  Something as simple as daily brisk walks can produce far more dramatic results than drugs in how fat and fit we are.

Ways for identifying people eligible for health discounts can be established.  People who get a driver’s license must pass written and driving tests.  Safe drivers and home owners get discounts on insurance.  Similar systems can be set up to reward fit people when they apply for health insurance.  A certificate from a doctor can show the results of blood tests, blood pressure readings and other health measures that indicate fitness.  Scales can easily give readings on site.  Just as cars are given a sticker showing they have passed inspection, centers of fitness and nutrition can be certified to provide evidence of completion of nutrition tests and other requirements that must be met for various levels of discount entitlement.  Discounts for proven health supplements, as opposed to drugs to treat the maladies associated with obesity, can be awarded as part of the fitness incentive program. Obviously, such programs would demand universal fitness standards based on valid current research and updated upon discoveries in medical science.   For example, safe limits for cholesterol need to be reviewed just as blood pressure limits have recently been changed for older folks.

Goals and measurements must be stated in language that confronts the negative consequences of our present behavior.  As a communication specialist, I know that words influence behavior.  We have to stop beating around the verbal bush.  “Fat” and “obese” must be clearly defined and used openly to denote where we are and what we need to change.  We must stop fooling ourselves and our children.  Fat is not fun or funny or beautiful.  Fat is costly and risky.  And too often deadly.

The failure rate in managing our fatness and fitness has remained too high for too long.  We don’t need to spend more tax dollars on helping people buy more drugs or use more health care.  We should not be handing out tickets to help people end up in an early grave.  Exercise is free and eating right can be done without extra cost.  Doing both will save us all billions of health care dollars each year.

Federal intervention sounds like a nasty solution to some.  To the contrary, it can be accomplished by built-in rewards for those of us who successfully assume greater personal responsibility for our health, nutrition, and fitness.  And those of us who are already fit and healthy reap our rewards by not being forced to subsidize those who are not.

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An award winning high school speech and English teacher, Priscilla Diffie-Couch went on to get her ED.D. from Oklahoma State University, priscilla picturewhere she taught speech followed by two years with the faculty of communication at the University of Tulsa.  In her consulting business later in Dallas, she designed and conducted seminars in organizational and group communication.

An avid tennis player, she has spent the last twenty years researching and reporting on health for family and friends.  She has two children, four grandchildren and lives with her husband Mickey in The Woodlands, Texas.

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A message from Bob Aronson.bob half of bob and jay photoBob’s Newheart was established to support and help everyone, but particularly those who need or have had organ transplants.  Some of our blogs are specifically related to donation/transplantation issues while others are more general, but they are all related.  Because anti-rejection drugs compromise immune systems, transplant recipients are more susceptible to a variety of diseases.  We provide general health and medical information to help them protect themselves while at the same time, helping others live healthier lives and avoid organ failure.

Bob’s Newheart mission is three-fold; 1) to provide news and information that promotes healthier living so people won’t need transplants; 2) To help recipients protect their new organs and; 3) to do what we can to ensure that anyone who needs an organ can get one.   About 7,000 Americans die every year while waiting for a life-saving organ.  I am sure you will agree that should not happen.

In the U.S. the great majority of people support organ donation, but only about 40% of us officially become organ donors.  Many have good intentions but just don’t get around to it.  It is hard to accept, but no one knows how long they will live.  My transplanted heart came from a 30 year old man.  I’m sure he had no intention of being a donor at that age.  If you are not yet a donor, please register at www.donatelife.net it only takes a few seconds. Then, tell your family so there is no confusion when the time comes to donate.  One organ donor can save or positively affect the lives of up to 60 people.  There is no nobler thing you can do than becoming an organ donor.

Bob Aronson Founder of Bob’s Newheart Established November 3, 2007

Sugar Could Be Killing us Physically and Financially


 By Bob Aronson

 sugar cartoonIn September 2013, a bombshell report from Credit Suisse’s Research Institute brought into sharp focus the staggering health consequences of sugar on the health of Americans. The group revealed that approximately “30%–40% of healthcare expenditures in the USA go to help address issues that are closely tied to the excess consumption of sugar.”  The figures suggest that our national addiction to sugar runs us an incredible $1 trillion in healthcare costs each year. The Credit Suisse report highlighted several health conditions including coronary heart diseases, type II diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which numerous studies have linked to excessive sugar intake.

This blog is not meant to be a condemnation of sugar.  It is a condemnation of our addiction to it.  We all love a sweet taste and frankly, we deserve it from time to time.  Often,there is no better reward, but we have to learn to limit our intake.  Like so many things in life it is the abuse of any substance that can cause us to suffer.  Sugar is particularly tough because it is unavoidable.  It is in almost everything and often is a naturally occurring substance.  We would all be a lot healthier if we would just read food labels and limit our excesses.  Having established this little disclaimer, we can now discuss sugar and its potential and real dangers.

 Women’s Health Magazine says that the typical American now swallows the equivalent of 22 sugar cubes every 24 hours. That means the average woman eats 70 pounds—nearly half her weight—of straight sugar every year. Women’s Health Magazine. http://www.womenshealthmag.com/health/dangers-of-sugar

In a major story on sugar Women’s Health goes on to say: When eaten in such vast quantities, sugar can wreak havoc on the body. Over time, that havoc can lead to diabetes and obesity, and also Alzheimer’s disease and breast, endometrial, and colon cancers. One new study found that normal-weight people who loaded up on sugar doubled their risk of dying from heart disease. Other research pinpoints excess sugar as a major cause of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, which can lead to liver failure.

The magazine characterized the use of sugar this way, “The instant something sweet touches your tongue, your taste buds direct-message your obesity graphicbrain: deee-lish. Your noggin’s reward system ignites, unleashing dopamine. Meanwhile, the sugar you swallowed lands in your stomach, where it’s diluted by digestive juices and shuttled into your small intestine. Enzymes begin breaking down every bit of it into two types of molecules: glucose and fructose. Most added sugar comes from sugar cane or sugar beets and is equal parts glucose and fructose; lab-concocted high-fructose corn syrup, however, often has more processed fructose than glucose. Eaten repeatedly, these molecules can hit your body…hard.

Anne Alexander, editorial director of Prevention and author of The Sugar Smart Diet provided this explanation of what sugars can do to your body.

 GlucoseGlucose graphic

  • It seeps through the walls of your small intestine, triggering your pancreas to secrete insulin, a hormone that grabs glucose from your blood and delivers it to your cells to be used as energy.
  • But many sweet treats are loaded with so much glucose that it floods your body, lending you a quick and dirty high. Your brain counters by shooting out serotonin, a sleep-regulating hormone. Cue: sugar crash.
  • Insulin also blocks production of leptin, the “hunger hormone” that tells your brain that you’re full. The higher your insulin levels, the hungrier you will feel (even if you’ve just eaten a lot). Now in a simulated starvation mode, your brain directs your body to start storing glucose as belly fat.
  • Busy-beaver insulin is also surging in your brain, a phenomenon that could eventually lead to Alzheimer’s disease. Out of whack, your brain produces less dopamine, opening the door for cravings and addiction-like neurochemistry.
  • Still munching? Your pancreas has pumped out so much insulin that your cells have become resistant to the stuff; all that glucose is left floating in your bloodstream, causing prediabetes or, eventually, full-force diabetes.

FructoseFructose graphic

  • It, too, seeps through your small intestine into the bloodstream, which delivers fructose straight to your liver.
  • ​Your liver works to metabolize fructosei.e., turn it into something your body can use. But the organ is easily overwhelmed, especially if you have a raging sweet tooth. Over time, excess fructose can prompt globules of fat to grow throughout the liver, a process called lipogenesis, the precursor to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.
  • ​Too much fructose also lowers HDL, or “good” cholesterol, and spurs the production of triglycerides, a type of fat that can migrate from the liver to the arteries, raising your risk for heart attack or stroke.
  • ​Your liver sends an S.O.S. for extra insulin (yep, the multi-tasker also aids liver function). Overwhelmed, your pancreas is now in overdrive, which can result in total-body inflammation that, in turn, puts you at even higher risk for obesity and diabetes

Robert Lustig, an endocrinologist from California gained national attention after a lecture he gave titled “Sugar: The Bitter Truth” went viral in 2009.  www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM

Lustig’s research looked at the connection between sugar consumption and the poor health of Americans came to a conclusion that startled many.  The Doctor has published twelve articles in peer-reviewed journals identifying sugar as a major factor in the epidemic of degenerative disease that now afflicts our country.  Lustig’s data clearly show that excessive sugar consumption is a key player in the development of some cancers along with obesity, type II diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease. As a result he has concluded that 75% of all diseases in America are brought on by our lifestyle and are entirely preventable.

While most in the medical profession seem to accept Lustig’s assessment of sugar at least one MD David Katz the director of the Yale Prevention Center, disagrees.  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-katz-md/sugar-health-evil-toxic_b_850032.html  Katz says, among other things, “So those most motivated to get the sugar they need wind up getting the most sugar. They, in turn, benefit from this by having more of the needed food energy — and thus are more likely to survive. In particular, they are more likely to survive into adulthood, and to procreate. And thus they become our ancestors, who pass traits along to us.”

Lest you think I am making a mountain of a molehill allow some of the body of evidence that sugar can cause health problems.   The claims about the ill health effects of sugar are not just those leveled by Dr. Lustig, they are backed by a solid body of research.  Here are just a few of the research headlines.

  • Consumption of Sugar-Sweetened Drinks Linked to Heart Disease
  • How Fructose Causes Obesity and Diabetes
  • Fructose intake connected with an increased risk of cardiovascular illness and diabetes in teenagers
  • Fructose consumption increases the risk of heart disease.
  • The Negative Impact of Sugary Drinks on Children.
  • Sugar and High Blood Pressure
  • Sugar Consumption Associated with Fatty Liver Disease and Diabetes
  • The Adverse Impact of Dietary Sugars on Cardiovascular Health
  • Rats Fed High Fructose Corn Syrup Exhibit Impaired Brain Function
  • High Fructose Corn Syrup Intake Linked with Mineral Imbalance and Osteoporosis.
  • Diet of Sugar and Fructose Impairs Brain Function

 To be healthy and avoid sugar or at least limit your intake you simply must read labels.  Unfortunately those who seek to force sugar into our systems have found many ways of complying with the law and telling us there’s sugar in their food but they do it in a manner that sounds less menacing.  

SWEET SYNONYMS
Watch for these sneaky ingredients when reading food labels. Some sound scientific, some almost healthy—but in the end, they all mean “sugar.”

Agave Nectar
Barbados Sugar
Barley Malt Syrup
Beet Sugar
Blackstrap Molasses
Cane Crystals
Cane Juice Crystals
Castor Sugar
Corn Sweetener
Corn Syrup
Corn Syrup Solids
Crystalline Fructose
Date Sugar
Demerara Sugar
Dextrose
Evaporated Cane Juice
Florida Crystals
Fructose
Fruit Juice
Fruit Juice Concentrate
Galactose
Glucose
Glucose Solids
Golden Sugar
Golden Syrup
Granulated Sugar
Grape Juice Concentrate
Grape Sugar
High-Fructose Corn Syrup
Honey
Icing Sugar
Invert Sugar
Lactose
Malt Syrup
Maltodextrin
Maltose
Mannitol
Maple Syrup
Molasses
Muscovado Syrup
Organic Raw Sugar
Powdered Sugar
Raw Sugar
Refiners’ Syrup
Rice Syrup
Sorbitol
Sorghum Syrup
Sucrose
Table Sugar
Treacle
Turbinado Sugar
Yellow Sugar

PICK YOUR POISON
Ultimately, added sugar is added sugar—it all affects you roughly the same way, regardless of where it comes from. Below you will find a short list of the most active and dangerous evil doers. .

High-Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS)

High fructose corn syrup

Derived from corn starch, syrupy HFCS might be the scariest sweet. Much of it contains mercury, a by-product of chemical processing. But another danger is its high artificial fructose content, not to mention that it can be 75 times sweeter than white sugar. (Listen up, agave eaters: The processed nectar can be up to 85 percent fructose and possibly more damaging to your liver than HFCS!)

Honey (http://tinyurl.com/ogge3r6

Honey sugar comparison

Often touted as far healthier than refined sugar, these do contain fewer chemicals and a better glucose-fructose balance (plus a few helpful antioxidants). However, says Anne Alexander, author of The Sugar Smartdiet even if the unique flavors of maple syrup and raw honey may lead people to use less, these sweeteners can still spike the body.

Natural Sugar

sugar

Sweet news! Unless it’s all you eat, it’s hard to go overboard on truly natural sugars that come directly from fruits and some veggies. Here’s the trick: You have to actually eat the produce. Fruit juices, even those without added sweeteners, will still sugar-bomb your bloodstream. The key is in the fiber, which slows sugar’s absorption in your body, preventing an insulin spike. Any fruit is fair game. “Ones with the most natural sugar have the most fiber,” says Robert Lustig, M.D.

So what’s the bottom line?  Should we avoid sugar completely?  Is that even possible?  Are sugar substitutes a healthy alternative?

First, you probably cannot avoid sugar completely and still eat because it appears naturally in so much of our daily diet.  Additionally, sugar is added to almost every product on the supermarket shelves so the best you can do is severely limit the amount you consume.  Here’s what the Mayo Clinic says. http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/added-sugar/art-20045328

How to reduce added sugar in your diet

To reduce the added sugar in your diet, try these tips:

  • Drink water or other calorie-free drinks instead of sugary, nondiet sodas or sports drinks. That goes for blended coffee drinks, too.
  • When you drink fruit juice, make sure it’s 100 percent fruit juice — not juice drinks that have added sugar. Better yet, eat the fruit rather than juice.
  • Choose breakfast cereals carefully. Although healthy breakfast cereals can contain added sugar to make them more appealing to children, plan to skip the non-nutritious, sugary and frosted cereals.
  • Opt for reduced-sugar varieties of syrups, jams, jellies and preserves. Use other condiments sparingly. Salad dressings and ketchup have added sugar.
  • Choose fresh fruit for dessert instead of cakes, cookies, pies, ice cream and other sweets.
  • Buy canned fruit packed in water or juice, not syrup.
  • Snack on vegetables, fruits, low-fat cheese, whole-grain crackers and low-fat, low-calorie yogurt instead of candy, pastries and cookies.

The final analysis

By limiting the amount of added sugar in your diet, you can cut calories without compromising on nutrition. In fact, cutting back on foods with added sugar and solid fats may make it easier to get the nutrients you need without exceeding your calorie goal.

Mayo concludes it’s summary on sugary by saying, “Take this easy first step: Next time you’re tempted to reach for a soda or other sugary drink, grab a glass of ice-cold water instead.”

Artificial sweeteners

artificial sweeteners

“So if I am supposed to avoid sugar, but I like sweets what are my alternatives?”  Well, there’s a lot of controversy surrounding this topic so we’ll turn to Web MD for an answer. http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/best-sugar-substitutes

Thanks to the newest sugar substitutes, it’s becoming easier (and healthier) to bake your cake and eat it too!

There are so many alternative sweeteners available now that they seem to be elbowing sugar right off the supermarket shelf. But what’s so wrong with sugar? At just 15 calories per teaspoon, “nothing–in moderation,” says Lona Sandon, R.D., an assistant professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. “The naturally occurring sugar in an apple is fine, but if we can reduce some of the added sugar in our diet, we can remove some of the empty calories.” Less than 25 percent of your daily calories should come from the added sugar in foods like cookies, cereal, and ketchup, she says. To satisfy your sweet tooth–especially if you’re counting calories, limiting carbs, or dealing with diabetes–try these options:

SWEETLEAF AND TRUVIA

What they are: These sugar alternatives are the latest made from stevia, an herb found in Central and South America that is up to 40 times sweeter than sugar but has zero calories and won’t cause a jump in your blood sugar. Stevia was slow to catch on because of its bitter, licorice-like aftertaste, but makers of Truvia and SweetLeaf have solved this problem by using the sweetest parts of the plant in their products.

Where to find them: In grocery stores and natural-food stores throughout the country and online at sweetleaf.com and truvia.com.

 How to use them: Both work well in coffee and tea or sprinkled over fruit, cereal, or yogurt. You can’t substitute stevia-based products for sugar in baked goods, though, because these products are sweeter than sugar and don’t offer the same color and texture. Makers of SweetLeaf promise to come out with a baking formulation soon.

Health Rx: “Truvia’s one of the most promising alternatives out there,” says nutritionist Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., author of The Healthiest Meals on Earth . “Right now, it looks safe. It tastes just like sugar and has almost no glycemic index, which means it won’t spike your blood sugar.”

WHEY LOW

What it is: Three naturally occurring sugars–fructose, the sugar in fruit; sucrose, or table sugar; and lactose, the sugar in milk–are blended to create this sweetener. While individually the sugars are fully caloric, when blended in Whey Low they interact in such a way that they aren’t completely absorbed into the body. As a result, at four calories per teaspoon, Whey Low has one quarter of the calories and less than one third of the glycemic index of sugar, so you’re less likely to crash after consuming it. It’s available in varieties similar to granular sugar, brown sugar, maple sugar, and confectioners’ sugar.

 

bobBob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 4,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs. You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

 

Kidney Disease — What You Need To Know


kidney cartoon 2

Blog by Bob Aronson

My last blog was about kidney disease and so is this one.  “Steering Toward Hope” told about Johnny Racine the Canadian father of 16 year old twin boys and how they turned their 2007 Ford Mustang into an 800 horsepower fire breathing showpiece named “The Kidney Hope Car.”  Racine, his boys and the rest of the “Steering” team will travel the width of Canada to promote organ donation and to raise money for kidney research.

This post will take a different but complimentary approach.  The law of supply and demand applies to human organs as it does to many other commodities.  While we must work harder than ever to increase the supply we must concurrently do everything we can to reduce the demand.  It is the only way we will ever arrive at anything even close to resembling a balance of the two. 

The following paragraphs will examine kidney disease from several angles — from listening to how patients describe their illness to prevention, treatment and what the future holds.

Before I get into the real life, real people part of this blog, let me first lay out the facts about Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD).  It is a major health problem that affects more than 26 million Americans.  It is the ninth-leading cause of death in the U.S.   While the numbers are different elsewhere every country is having the same experience.  Whether you are from Singapore, New Zealand, Canada or Peru you will find that kidney disease is on the rise and there are not enough organs for the number of people who need transplants.

Of the 26 million Americans with kidney disease, about half a million face kidney failure, the condition that requires dialysis. Dialysis, though, is not a cure and in many cases is a stop gap effort while the patient awaits an organ transplant — but transplants are hard to get. 

At this writing in November of 2013 there are almost 100,000 people on the list awaiting kidney transplants but 5-6,000 of them die while waiting because the supply of organs not only does not meet demand it is falling farther and farther behind.  Unlike other transplants though, one can also get a kidney from a living donor but there aren’t enough of them either in fact the number of living kidney donors has fallen steadily for the past several years, to 13,040 in 2012, despite the growing need.  Regardless of the source the average wait time for a Kidney Transplant in the U.S. is 1,121 days. 

I’m hoping this blog will help people understand two things. 1) how to prevent kidney disease and 2) what to expect if you get it.  But first, I think it is important to discuss what causes CKD.

Causes of Kidney Disease

The two main causes of chronic kidney disease are diabetes and high blood pressure, which are responsible for up to two-thirds of the cases. Diabetes happens when your blood sugar is too high, causing damage to many organs in your body, including the kidneys and heart, as well as blood vessels, nerves and eyes. High blood pressure, or hypertension, occurs when the pressure of your blood against the walls of your blood vessels increases. If uncontrolled, or poorly controlled, high blood pressure can be a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes and chronic kidney disease. Also, chronic kidney disease can cause high blood pressure.

Other conditions that affect the kidneys are:

  • Glomerulonephritis, a group of diseases that cause inflammation and damage to the kidney’s filtering units.
  •  Inherited diseases, such as polycystic kidney disease, which causes large cysts in the kidneys that damage the surrounding tissue
  • Repeated urinary infections.
  • Pregnancy problems. Sometimes a narrowing of the womb can occur that prevents normal outflow of urine causing it instead to flow back up to the kidney causing infections and kidney damage.
  •  Lupus and other immune system diseases
  • Obstructions caused by kidney stones, tumors or, in men, an enlarged prostate gland.

High risk groups include those with diabetes, hypertension and family history of kidney failure.  African Americans, Hispanics, Pacific Islanders, American Indians and senior citizens are at increased risk.

Before we get into the details of kidney disease and what to do if you have it, let us first discuss how to avoid it.  While there is no sure fire way to prevent kidney problems there are many very effective steps you can take because lifestyle can be a great contributor to the development of all diseases.

Avoiding Kidney Disease

national kidney foundation logoThe National Kidney Foundation has the following guidelines to reduce the risk of developing kidney disease:

  • Reduce sodium intake: Americans consume too much sodium (salt)
  • Limit red meat: Diets high in protein – especially those with animal protein – may harm the kidneys. Red meat is also high in saturated fat.
  • Avoid soda: Sugar-sweetened drinks, like sodas, are high in calories and contain no nutritious value. Additionally, colas have phosphorus additives which can damage kidneys.
  • Give up processed foods: Potato chips, crackers, cheese spreads, instant potato mix, and deli meats are all examples of processed foods that are high in phosphorus additives and sodium – both of which can have a damaging effect on the kidneys.
  • Reduce sugar intake: Consuming too much sugar can result in diabetes or obesity – both linked to kidney disease.
  • Sit less and stand more: Recent research has linked sitting for 8 hours or more a day with developing kidney disease.
  • Exercise and lose weight: Diabetes is responsible for 44 percent of all new cases of kidney failure. Obesity and Type 2 diabetes are on the rise and can often be treated and reversed.
  • Manage high blood pressure: Both considered silent killers, many people don’t realize high blood pressure and kidney disease are linked. Controlling blood pressure levels can prevent kidney damage and failure.
  • Avoid long term use of kidney-toxic drugs: Over-the-counter (OTC) pain medications, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen brand names (Motrin, Advil, and Nuprin).
  • Get tested: Ask your doctor for an annual urine test to check for protein in the urine, one of the earliest signs of kidney disease, and a blood test for creatinine

But…there’s a whole lot more to preventing kidney disease.  The Correct Diet Can Help Avoid Kidney Disease  http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/259203.php (See this link for the full story.)

Bad diet choices and habits like smoking and obesity are linked to ajkd logoan increased risk for kidney disease, suggests a new study published in the American Journal of Kidney Disease.

A group of investigators, led by Alex Chang, MD, of Johns Hopkins University, discovered that people with regular kidneys whose diet quality was bad – high in processed and red meats, sodium, and sugar-sweetened beverages, and low in fruit, nuts, legumes, whole grains, and low-fat dairy – were more likely to develop kidney disease.

Just one percent of people without unhealthy diet or lifestyle choices developed protein in their urine – an early sign of kidney damage. On the other hand, 13% of participants who had at least three unhealthy factors such as obesity, smoking, and poor diet developed protein in their urine.

Obese people, i.e. those with a body mass index (BMI) of at least 30, were twice as likely to develop kidney disease, the authors reported. A poor diet independently influenced risk for chronic kidney disease after adjusting for weight and other influential factors.

In total, those who ended up with kidney disease were more likely…

  • to be African American
  • to have high blood pressure
  • to have diabetes
  • to have a family history of kidney disease
  • have a higher intake of soft drinks, fast food, and red meat compared to those who did not have kidney disease.

How it Feels to Have Kidney Disease

Now let’s get to the disease itself. The medical profession can describe it in terms no one can understand but I prefer to hear from patients.  What does it feel like to have kidney disease, how does your body change?  That’s a tough question to answer because so many people have no symptoms or symptoms that are so mild they don’t notice them but we did find some clear, understandable and frightening explanations.

We are going to look at symptoms of kidney failure from two perspectives. First the little tell-tale signs that something might be amiss and secondly the more specific complaints as told by patients.  Fist the little signs that indicate you might have kidney disease but don’t diagnose yourself.  See your physician.  You might have kidney disease if you:

  • feel more tired and have less energy
  • have trouble concentrating
  • have a poor appetite
  • have trouble sleeping
  • have muscle cramping at night
  • have swollen feet and ankles
  • have puffiness around your eyes, especially in the morning
  • have dry, itchy skin
  • Need to urinate more often, especially at night

Now let’s look at more serious conditions. If you are feeling anything like any of the following people you probably should see your doctor as soon as possible.

  • “I feel like I have the flu and am cold most of the time and. When I take my temperature, it is normal. I feel sort of dizzy, have a loss of appetite, food doesn’t have any taste, I have shortness of breath, no energy, and am nauseous.  It’s pretty miserable.”
  • “When I first got sick I really thought it was a normal cold. I had a fever, was sneezing, runny nose etc. Then it got worse to where I was throwing up, had blood coming out in spits, vomit, urine, etc. Then it became really hard to breath and I couldn’t lay down anymore as it would cause me to suffocate. I ended up in the hospital where they told me both my kidneys failed and liquid was pushed up to my lungs which was causing me to suffocate. I don’t want to scare anyone but please learn from my mistake of not going to the hospital for about 3 weeks after I first got the cold like symptoms. Get a check up even if you think it is a cold!”
  • “My kidney failure was discovered by accident through routine blood work at the time of my yearly physical. The first red flag was a high potassium level on two different blood draws over a two month period of time. I had observed several symptoms too,  The first symptom strangely was an “itchy back,” another one was an “ill feeling” — not being very hungry – sweating — breathlessness — a rapid heart rate — and discomfort (pain) in the location of the left kidney. These “symptoms” did not appear all at once or I would have seen a doctor. I now know that all of these are symptoms of chronic kidney failure. It is vital to be informed and educated.” 
  •  “I was diagnosed about three years ago with stage 3 kidney failure. I had no signs that I was aware of as I also have congestive heart failure.  Now, I itch alll over my body, perspire excessively and have extreme pain in my back, neck,shoulders and legs, as well as increased ankle swelling.”
  • “I did not realize I had quit urinating until my husband and I went on a long road trip. I didn’t feel the need to stop to urinate at all. I paid no attention at the time but now I remember that I was very nauseous, vomiting, and had horrible leg cramps. On the third day I went to the ER and was admitted to the ICU. After five dialysis treatments I started to recover.   I now measure my output just to be sure.”

For the sake of education let’s assume you have been diagnosed with kidney disease. What are your options?  There really are only two.  1) you can choose to allow your medical team to treat it with medication and ultimately dialysis.  2) a kidney transplant but you must qualify and only a medical team at a transplant center can determine if you are a candidate for a transplant.

If Dialysis is Ordered

Chronic kidney disease continually gets worse and eventually leads to end-stage renal disease, also known as kidney failure.

\Your doctor might recommend you begin dialysis treatments once you reach the point where you have only 10 to 15 percent of kidney function left.

With kidney failure, the toxins and excess fluid that your kidneys should be releasing begin to build up in your body. People suffering from kidney failure begin dialysis to help their bodies remove these wastes, salts and fluid.

Two kinds of Dialysis

  1. Hemodialysis and
  2. Peritoneal dialysis.

Hemodialysis is typically performed at dialysis centers or hospitals but some clinics offer smaller devices for home use.

Hemodialysis, patients generally have an access point  in their arm to which the dialysis machine is connected.  On average It takes aobut four hours for the blood that is drawn from your body to be cleansed and returned.

Peritoneal dialysis is more likely to be done at home after you have a catheter placed in your stomach (a minor surgery).

There are two kinds of Peritoneal dialysis, 1) continuous ambulatory and 2) continuous cycling

Continuous cycling peritoneal dialysis is usually done at night. Before retiring you attach the dialysis machine tube to your catheter which pumps a solution into your stomach.  It stays there for a few hours so your stomach can act as a filter allowing waste and other fluids to pass through it into the solution.

Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis is much different because you don’t need a  machine. You simply run dialysis solution into your abdomen through the catheter and after 4k to 6 hours drain it into a bag.  A physician can tell you how often during the day you need to do this

Risk Factors

There are several.  They include anemia, bone disease, high blood pressure and depression. Some patients on hemodialysis might have also have problems with low blood pressure.

Patients undergoing peritoneal dialysis are at risk of developing peritonitis which is an infection in the stomach lining. Your doctor will likely prescribe antibiotics to treat the problem.

 Got questions?  Many answers can be found here.

http://www.nwkidney.org/dialysis/startingOut/basic/faqs.html

 A Kidney Transplant

If it has been determined that a Kidney transplant is your only option this information may prove to be invaluable. 

KidneyBuzz.com encourages patients to stay as healthy as possible by managing stress, eating well, and staying active. It is important for patients to remain as well as possible during this time, so they are ready for kidney transplant surgery as soon as a donor organ becomes available. For patients who have a living organ donor, scheduling transplant surgery can take into account the health status of the recipient as well as other factors.

Manage your stress. Many patients constantly worry about their treatments, blood work results, future surgeries, etc. Education and support groups both online such as KidneyBuzz.com, and offline provide patients with tools and support to manage their stress and cope with the challenges associated with their condition. Recommended Reading: Will You be Ready when Your Time Comes for a Kidney Transplant? (this link and links below from KidneyBuzz)

There are other strategies that you can employ to expedite obtaining a Kidney Transplant including listing at more than one transplant center (Multi-Listing). Research has consistently shown that patients who are strategically Multiple Listed will greatly increase their chances of receiving a Kidney Transplant faster.   Nevertheless, only a mere 4.7% of individuals with CKD utilize the Multiple Listing technique.

KidneyBuzz Recommended Reading: “Ins-and -Outs” of Increasing your Chances of Getting a Kidney Faster

There are also website resources available that assist people with CKD to find Kidney Transplant Centers with the lowest average wait times that are the closest to where they live. These free user friendly website tools can be particularly helpful to people who are on a Kidney Transplant Waiting List in a high wait time area because it can significantly increase their access to  Kidney Transplant Centers options with far lower wait times. You can email KidneyBuzz.com at contact@kidneybuzz.com for more information and direct links to discussed sites.

Once you have determined the treatment track you will take the next logobig question most people have is, “How do I pay for the it?”  Well, if you have regular health insurance that might cover it.  If not the National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC) http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/financialhelp/ offer this information”

In 1972, Congress passed legislation making people of any age with permanent kidney failure eligible for Medicare, a program that helps people age 65 or older and people with disabilities pay for medical care, usually up to 80 percent. The remaining 20 percent can still pose a significant financial burden on patients. Fortunately, other public and private resources can help. Anyone with permanent kidney failure who does not have adequate insurance coverage should seek the help of a certified or licensed social worker. Every dialysis and transplant center has a social worker who can help people with kidney failure locate and apply for financial assistance. Social workers who specialize in helping kidney patients are called nephrology social workers.

Patients can also enlist the assistance of the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP). The SHIP is a national program that provides free counseling and assistance to Medicare beneficiaries on a wide range of Medicare and supplemental insurance matters. Patients can find a state program by visiting shipnpr.shiptalk.org/shipprofile.aspx click to view disclaimer page.

Medicarecms logo

To qualify for Medicare on the basis of kidney failure, a person must require regular dialysis or have had a Medicare-covered kidney transplant and must have paid into Social Security through an employer-or be the child or spouse of someone who has or have worked under the Railroad Retirement Board, or as a government employee-or be the child or spouse of someone who has or already be receiving Social Security, Railroad Retirement, or Office of Personnel Management benefits.

The Original Medicare Plan has two parts: Part A is hospital insurance, and Part B is medical insurance. Part B covers most outpatient services, including kidney dialysis, doctors’ services, outpatient hospital services, and many other health services and supplies. While Part A has no premiums, most Part B services require premiums, deductibles, and coinsurance.

Some people who are not eligible for Medicare because they have not worked at a job that pays into Social Security may still be eligible to buy Medicare coverage by paying premiums for Part A.

For more information check with the NKUDIC (link posted above)

935503_10201217871274032_357839664_nJay Robare is a friend and a member of my Facebook group Organ Transplant Initiative.  He is the talent behind the design of the OTI logo.  Jay is legally blind and has been on the kidney transplant list for about four years.  He wrote this about two years ago when he lived in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.  He is now a resident of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Here’s Jay’s story….he’s still waiting.

The Jay Robare Story

Waiting for a Kidney

By the time that I was approved for Medicare, I had gone through all my savings and my limited insurance coverage. I had to quit working because my endurance was gone and because I was not working, I could not afford my apartment anymore and I had to start living with others that helped me out. I lost all my furniture and most of my art equipment.

I finally got disability insurance and was qualified for Medicare but not Medicaid since I was making too much money from disability; I got enough to pay rent and had some money for paper products, which costs a lot. I have to dry my hands on paper towels to stay sterile.

I was blessed with $200 in food stamps last year but that has been decreased too; I am out of food by the third week of the month. I keep asking for rides to the various food banks but people are too busy. I am not the only one going through this; most people just can’t understand the magnitude of what we are going through in our lives and in our bodies. I know everyone is having problems for I hear that all the time but when I got sick and started working to get on the waiting list, all my doctors and nurses treated me like I was given a special gift which it is…the gift of life but many people would rather worry about their financial or relationship problem that they will outlive. We won’t outlive our problems, they are literally killing us.

****Editors note.  (When Jay lived in fort Lauderdale he was on Peritoneal Dialyisis…he is no longer but I included it because patient should know about it.)

I didn’t even talk about having to do dialysis every night. The type of dialysis that I do is called Peritoneal Dialysis where I store 2,500 milliliters of sugar saline solution for 2 and a half hour cycles 4 times which is all carbohydrates. I have gained 30 Lbs and I look very well fed; my fried Dirk said I looked like I had a beer belly…my last beer was a Heineken last Christmas. One nice thing about PD instead of hemo dialysis is that I have no liquid restraints. On hemo, I could only have 60 Oz a day or I would risk cramping and THAT was a bitch. Cramps formed in muscles that I thought I never had and the pain was so bad it made me yell out for Jesus…made my tech laugh at me.

Speaking of techs, I had clowns that would not listen to me and do the treatment their own way ending up hurting me. For you on Hemo, THIS IS YOUR TREATMENT AND YOUR BODY, don’t take any crap from these people; make sure that your nurse knows and the director knows that you do not want this person touching you again. Another thing that I like about PD is that it is robbing my body of potassium and this lets me eat things that hemo would never let me eat like bananas, mashed potatoes, spinach, hummus, vegetables and fruits. I do have to take something called a binder every time that I eat something. This medicine absorbs all the phosphorus in the food. The binder can be nasty at times, it is very dry and tastes like I am eating chalk. The chalk does a good job but sometimes it is difficult to take. The meds are a chewable but I think they are coming out with a powder soon.

Another med that I have to take because of PD and a bad parathyroid, caused by ESKD is a drug called Zemplar and Sensipar. Both keep my calcium land my PTH levels down. The only problem is that Sensipar has made me nauseous for the last 4 years; I have been throwing up every time I took this drug for 7-8 months. I guess my body has had enough. The doctors, dietitians and I have been playing games for years. I have finally decided to have a perthyroidectomy. After this surgery, I will need to start taking calcium supplements, including eating more pizza and lasagna…LOL I

I get extremely tired sometimes during the day from either walking to the bus stop and going to Publix to get some noodles or walking from the bus stop to my Davita dialysis clinic to get labs done every Monday or Tuesday; I need to send a vile of blood to my transplant hospital every week so they can keep an eye on my health and changes in my DNA.

*** Editors Note (Jay is now living in Philadelphia and is on hemodialysis which limits his liquid intake.  He is desperately trying to find a living donor.  This journey has been very hard on Jay yet somehow he manages to keep his spirits up.

The Kidney Transplant

kidneysEveryone has two kidneys, each the size of a fist and they have a very important job to do. They filter waste and remove extra water from your blood to make urine.  But…there’s more.  Your kidneys also control your blood pressure and make hormones that your body needs to stay healthy. 

During a kidney transplant

Kidney transplants are performed with general anesthesia, so you’re not aware during the procedure. The surgical team monitors your heart rate, blood pressure and blood oxygen level throughout the procedure.

During the surgery:

  • The surgeon makes an incision and places the new kidnKidney transplantey in your lower abdomen. Unless your own kidneys are causing complications such as high blood pressure or infection, they are left in place.
  • The blood vessels of the new kidney are attached to blood vessels in the lower part of your abdomen, just above one of your legs.
  • The new kidney’s ureter — the tube that links the kidney to the bladder — is connected to your bladder.

Kidney transplant surgery usually lasts about three to four hours.

After a kidney transplant

After your kidney transplant, you can expect to:

  1. Spend several days to a week in the hospital. Doctors and nurses monitor your condition in the hospital’s transplant recovery area to watch for signs of complications. Your new kidney will make urine like your own kidneys did when they were healthy. Often this starts immediately. In other cases it takes several days. Expect soreness or pain around the incision site while you’re healing.
  2. Have frequent checkups as you continue recovering. After you leave the hospital, close monitoring is necessary for a few weeks. Your transplant team will develop a checkup schedule for you. During this time, if you live in another town, you may need to make arrangements to stay close to the transplant center.
  3. Take medications the rest of your life. You’ll take a number of medications after your kidney transplant. Drugs called immunosuppressants help keep your immune system from attacking your new kidney. Additional drugs help reduce the risk of other complications, such as infection, after your transplant.]

http://www.mayoclinic.org/kidney-transplant/kidney-transplant-procedure.html

The Future

What does the future hold?  It is easy to speculate about what the future holds and absolutely impossible to be accurate.  We just don’t know.  Is there promise? Yes! There are many promising developments taking place in laboratories around the world every day.  We won’t go in to all of them because if history is any indicator most of those experiments will fail.  There are some, though, that hold some promise at least for now…like this one.

Intravenous Kidney Cell Transplant Experiments Raise Hope for Future Human Kidney Failure Treatments

May 31, 2012 — Indiana University School of Medicine scientists have successfully transplanted primary kidney cells intravenously to treat renal failure in rats, pointing the way to a possible future alternative to kidney transplants and expensive dialysis treatments in humans.

The researchers, Katherine J. Kelly, M.D., associate professor of medicine, and Jesus Dominguez, M.D., professor of medicine, genetically modified the cells in the laboratory to produce a protein — called SAA — that plays an important role in renal cell growth, embryonic kidney development and kidney regeneration after an injury. Modified cells found their way to the appropriate locations of the damaged kidneys, resulting in regeneration of tissue and improved function in the kidney.

The researchers’ work has been accepted for publication in the American Journal of Physiology — Renal Physiology, which published an advance online version of the paper on May 16.  You can read more here http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/05/120531135645.htm

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Bob_Aronson at Mayo Jax tight shot 2008-01-30DJH--02Bob Aronson is a heart transplant recipient.  He got his new heart on August 21,2007 at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida where he now lives with wife Robin and their two dogs Reilly, a soft coated Wheaten, and Ziggy a Mini Schnauzer.

For some 25 years before his transplant Bob was an international communications consultant and owner of the Aronson Partnership which became the  Aronson Communications Group after the surgery.  Today he is semi retired and also assists his artist wife Robin with her Jinglers Jewelry art show business.

Prior to starting his consulting firm in the 1980s he served as the Communications Director for a Minnesota Governor;  was the first Anchor of Morning Edition on the Minnesota Public Radio Network; worked as a journalist at several Midwest broadcast facilities and from 1965 to 1974 was one of the first radio talk show hosts in the country.   

Aronson founded Bob’s Newheart and Facebook’s Organ Transplant Initiative (OTI) on November 3, 2007.  OTI is a 3,000 member transplant patient, recipient, caregiver and donor/donor family support and education group. 

Readers are welcome to Join OTI with the only requirement being that you support our mission which can be found in the “About” section of OTI.  We seek to grow our membership because by so doing will have more influence with decision makers as we pursue those issues which would most benefit our members.

Please view our music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

Thank you for reading our Bob’s Newheart blogs and please leave a comment or contact Bob directly at bob@baronson.org.  We intend to continue to expand the number of issues we cover and the availability of information to the public.  You’ll find scores of other posts on Bob’s Newheart, just check the index for topics, click and read.

If you are an organ donor we thank you.  If not you can become one by going to www.donatelife.net it only takes a few minutes.  Then, tell your family what you have done so there is no confusion later.

 

We Are Killing Our Own Organs — 30 Worst Foods, 100 Best.


The key to solving the shortage of transplantable organs is to eliminate the demand for them.

“We have met the enemy and he is us,” has become a trite expression but that doesn’t make it any less true.  We are our own worst enemies.   The numbers are staggering.  We are killing ourselves in four ways:

  1. We drink too much alcohol
  2. We smoke too much
  3. We eat too much of the wrong food

Let’s look at he facts.

  1. 22.5% are current smokers, resulting in significant health problems and associated costs.
  2. 8.5% of Americans abuse alcohol or are alcohol dependent,.
  3.  Approximately 30.4% of adults in the United States are obese,

The estimated annual medical expenditures associated with alcohol abuse total $26.3 billion.  Organs most commonly affected are the lungs, kidneys, pancreas, heart and liver.

Second,  smoking.  Medical costs caused by cigarette smoking exceed $75 billion a year.  According to the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, Smoking harms nearly every organ of the body and causes many diseasesCigarette smoking remains the single most-common preventable cause of death in the United States,  The adverse health effects from cigarette smoking account for more than 440,000 deaths, or nearly one of every five deaths, each year in the United States.

Finally obesity combined with eating the wrong foods.  A good number of these people experience some organ failure.  The direct medical costs for obesity have been approximated at $51.6 billion per year. The organs most often affected are the heart, kidneys and pacnreas.   http://abcnews.go.com/Health/PictureOfHealth/story?id=4286176&page=1

This blog is about preventing organ failure  and one way to do that is to be a little more careful about how much we eat and what we decide to consume.   There are two lists here, 1) the worst foods and 2) the best foods.

Top 30 Worst Foods in America (from Food Matters

Note from Bob’s Newheart.  While Food Matters lists 30 I am only listing ten.  You can click on their link for the rest of the story)

Today’s food marketers have loaded many of their offerings with so much fat, sugar, and sodium that eating any of the foods in this article on a daily basis could destroy all your hard work and best intentions of eating healthy. Beware! This list is brought to you by Eat This Not That and Men’s Health. http://foodmatters.tv/articles-1/the-30-worst-foods-in-america-beware

1. Worst Meal in America

Carl’s Jr. Six Dollar Guacamole Bacon Burger with Medium Natural Cut Fries and 32-oz Coke

1,810 calories – 92 g fat (29.5 g saturated, 2 g trans) – 3,450 mg sodium

Of all the gut-growing, heart-threatening, life-shortening burgers in the drive-thru world, there is none whose damage to your general well-being is as potentially catastrophic as this. A bit of perspective is in order: This meal has the caloric equivalent of 9 Krispy Kreme Original Glazed doughnuts, the saturated fat equivalent of 30 strips of bacon, and the salt equivalent of 10 large orders of McDonald’s French fries!

2. Worst Drink

Baskin-Robbins Large Chocolate Oreo Shake

2,600 calories – 135 g fat (59 g saturated, 2.5 g trans) – 1,700 mg sodium – 263 g sugars

We didn’t think anything could be worse than Baskin-Robbins’ 2008 bombshell, the Heath Bar Shake. After all, it had more sugar (266 grams) than 20 bowls of Froot Loops, more calories (2,310) than 11 actual Heath Bars, and more ingredients (73) than you’ll find in most chemistry sets. Yet the folks at Baskin-Robbins have shown that when it comes to making America fat, they’re always up to the challenge. The large Chocolate Oreo Shake is soiled with more than a day’s worth of calories and 3 days’ worth of saturated fat. Worst of all, it takes less than 10 minutes to sip through a straw.

3. Worst Ribs

Outback Steakhouse Baby Back Ribs

2,580 calories

Let’s be honest: Ribs are rarely served alone on a plate. When you add a sweet potato and Outback’s Classic Wedge Salad, this meal is a 3,460-calorie blowout. (Consider that it takes only 3,500 calories to add a pound of fat to your body. Better plan for a very, very long “walkabout” when this meal is over!)

4. Worst Pizza
Uno Chicago Grill Classic Deep Dish Individual Pizza

2,310 calories – 165 g fat (54 g saturated) – 4,920 mg sodium – 120 g carbs

The problem with deep dish pizza (which Uno’s knows a thing or two about, since they invented it back in 1943) is not just the extra empty calories and carbs from the crust, it’s that the thick doughy base provides the structural integrity to house extra heaps of cheese, sauce, and greasy toppings. The result is an individual pizza with more calories than you should eat in a day and more sodium than you would find in 27 small bags of Lays Potato Chips. Oh, did we mention it has nearly 3 days’ worth of saturated fat, too? The key to success at Uno’s lies in their flatbread pizza.

5. Worst Mexican Dish


Chili’s Fajita Quesadillas Beef with Rice and Beans, 4 Flour Tortillas, and Condiments

2,240 calories – 92 g fat (43.5 g saturated) – 6,390 mg sodium – 253 g carbs

Since when has it ever been a smart idea to combine 2 already calorie- and sodium-packed dishes into one monstrous meal? This confounding creation delivers nearly a dozen Krispy Kreme original glazed doughnuts worth of calories, the sodium equivalent of 194 saltine crackers, and the saturated fat equivalent of 44 strips of bacon. Check please.

6. Worst Seafood Dish


Romano’s Macaroni Grill Parmesan Crusted Sole

2,190 calories – 141 g fat (58 g saturated) – 2,980 mg sodium – 145 g carbs

Fish is normally a safe bet, but this entrée proves that it’s all in the preparation. If you fry said fish in a shell of cheese, be prepared to pay the consequences. Here that means meeting your daily calorie, fat, saturated fat, and sodium intake in one sitting.

7. Worst Chinese Dish

P.F. Chang’s Combo Lo Mein

1,968 calories – 96 g fat (12 g saturated) – 5,860 mg sodium

Lo mein is normally looked at as a side dish, a harmless pile of noodles to pad your plate of orange chicken or broccoli beef. This heaping portion (to be fair, Chang’s does suggest diners share an order) comes spiked with chicken, shrimp, beef, and pork, not to mention an Exxon Valdez-size slick of oil. The damage? A day’s worth of calories, 1 ½ days’ worth of fat, and 2 ½ days’ worth of sodium. No meat-based dish beats out the strip.

8. Worst Appetizer
On the Border Firecracker Stuffed Jalapenos with Chili con Queso

1,950 calories – 134 g fat (36 g saturated) – 6,540 mg sodium

Appetizers are the most problematic area of most chain-restaurant menus. That’s because they’re disproportionately reliant on the type of cheesy, greasy ingredients that catch hungry diners’ eyes when they’re most vulnerable—right when they sit down. Seek out lean protein options like grilled shrimp skewers or ahi tuna when available; if not, simple is best—like chips and salsa.

9. Worst Burger


Chili’s Smokehouse Bacon Triple Cheese Big Mouth Burger with Jalapeno Ranch Dressing

1,901 calories – 138 g fat (47 g saturated) – 4,201 mg sodium

Any burger whose name is 21 syllables long is bound to spell trouble for your waistline. This burger packs almost an entire day’s worth of calories and 2 ½ days’ worth of fat. Chili’s burger menu rivals Ruby Tuesday’s for the worst in America, so you’re better off with one of their reasonable Fajita Pitas to silence your hunger.

10. Worst Sandwich
Quizno’s Large Tuna Melt

1,760 calories – 133 g fat (26 g saturated, 1.5 g trans) – 2,120 mg sodium

In almost all other forms, tuna is a nutritional superstar, so how did it end up as the headliner for America’s Worst Sandwich? Blame an absurdly heavy hand with the mayo the tuna is mixed with, along with Quiznos’ larger-than-life portion sizes. Even though they’ve managed to trim this melt down from the original 2,000-plus calorie mark when we first tested it, it still sits squarely at the bottom of the sandwich ladder.

Now you know what to avoid, and we urge you to click on the Food Matters link to read the whole list.  So, if you can’t eat any of the aforementioned items what do you eat?  There’s plenty to choose from.   Health Life lists 100 and you can read them all by clicking on their link. Here are their top ten.

http://www.dwlz.com/HealthyLife/healthy50.html

THE 100 HEALTHIEST FOODS

Fruit

Fat/Calorie Breakdown

Body Benefits

(1) Apples

1 medium apple:
81 calories, 0 g fat

An apple’s 3 g of fiber help you meet your fiber goal of 20 g to 30 g daily.  High-fiber diets can lower heart disease risk.

(2) Apricots

3 apricots:
51 calories, 0 g fat

A good source of beta-carotene (which is converted to vitamin A by the body), providing the equivalent of 35% of the RDA for vitamin A

(3) Bananas

1 medium:
105 calories, 0 g fat

Bananas are a great source of potassium, which plays a key role in heart health and muscle function.  Plus each one has 2 g of fiber.

(4) Blackberries

1 cup:
74 calories, 0 g fat

This fruit boasts a whopping 10 g of fiber in a single cup.

(5) Blueberries

1 cup:
81 calories, 0 g fat

Blueberries help prevent and treat bladder infections by making it hard for bacteria to stick to urinary tract walls.

(6) Cantaloupe

1 cup, cubed:
84 calories, 1 g fat

An antioxidant double whammy, with 68 mg of vitamin C and enough beta-carotene to cover 65% of your daily vitamin A quota.

(7) Cherries

1 cup:
84 calories, 1 g fat

A good source of perillyl alcohol, which helps prevent cancer in animals.  Heart-protective anthocyanins give cherries their color.

(8) Cranberry
juice

1 cup:
144 calories, 0 g fat

Fights bladder infections the same way blueberries do.

(9) Grapefruits

1/2 fruit:
39 calories, 0 g fat

A good source of vitamin C and a compound called naringenin, which helps suppress tumors in animals.

(10) Purple grapes
and juice

1 cup seedless:
113 calories, 9 g fat

Offer three heart-guarding compounds:  flavonoids, anthocyanins and resveratrol.  (Green grapes are not rich in them)

If you insist on eating meat there are some good choices you can make…we’ll jump ahead on the list to give you a sneak preview.

74) Beef 3 oz, cooked:
150 to 280 calories,
5 g to 20 g fat
Beef is a good source of both CLA and iron, but since it’s also high in saturated fat, have it no more than three times a week.
(75) Chicken,
without skin
3 oz, cooked:
162 calories, 6 g fat
Remove the skin and you’ve got an excellent, low fat source of protein.  And 3 oz provides 38% of the RDA for the B vitamin niacin.
(76) Lamb 3 oz, cooked, trimmed
of fat:
175 calories, 8 g fat
Lamb, like beef, is also a good source of CLA.  Ditto beef’s saturated fat warning and weekly consumption recommendation.
(77) Lean
pork
3 oz, cooked, trimmed
of fat:
140 calories, 4 g fat
Fat-trimmed pork tenderloin has one-third less fat than even lean beef.  And it boasts 71% of the RDA for thiamine.

If Healthy Life doesn’t offer you enough good food ideas, here are some other excellent resources for you to peruse.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

Mayo Clinic Preventing the Top Threats to Men’s and Women’s Health


Preventing the Top Threats to WOMEN’S Health

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/womens-health/WO00014

At first glance one might suspect that men and women are threatened by the same health problems; cancer, heart disease, stroke and many morel  And while there is some truth to that supposition there are also great differences.  The Mayo Clinic, using information from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) nicely summarized the threats and preventive steps that can and should be taken.

These tips are great reminders for everyone.

Many of the leading threats to women’s health can be prevented — if you know how. Consider this top seven list of women’s health threats, compiled from statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other leading organizations. Then get serious about reducing your risks.

No. 1: Heart disease

Heart disease isn’t just a man’s disease — it’s also a major women’s health threat. Take charge of heart health by making healthier lifestyle choices. For example:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit. It’s also important to avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Choose vegetables, fruits, whole grains, high-fiber foods and lean sources of protein, such as fish. Limit foods high in saturated fat and sodium.
  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Include physical activity in your daily routine. Choose sports or other activities you enjoy, from brisk walking to ballroom dancing.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Extra pounds increase the risk of heart disease.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. Too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure.
  • Manage stress. If you feel constantly on edge or under assault, your lifestyle habits may suffer. Take steps to reduce stress — or learn to deal with stress in healthy ways.

No. 2: Cancer

Various types of cancer are of particular concern to women, including breast cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer and colorectal cancer. To reduce the risk of cancer, consider these general tips:

  • Don’t smoke. Using any type of tobacco puts you on a collision course with cancer. Avoiding exposure to secondhand smoke counts, too.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Losing excess pounds — and keeping them off — may lower the risk of various types of cancer.
  • Get moving. In addition to helping you control your weight, physical activity on its own may lower the risk of certain types of cancer.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Although making healthy selections at the grocery store and at mealtime can’t guarantee cancer prevention, it may help reduce your risk.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. When you’re outdoors, cover up and use plenty of sunscreen.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. The risk of various types of cancer — including cancer of the breast, colon, lung, kidney and liver — increases with the amount of alcohol you drink and the length of time you’ve been drinking regularly.
  • Breast-feed, if you can. Breast-feeding may help reduce the risk of breast cancer.
  • Take early detection seriously. Consult your doctor for regular mammograms and other cancer screenings.

No. 3: Stroke

You can’t control some stroke risk factors, such as family history, age and race. But you can control other contributing factors. For example:

  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit.
  • Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet, being especially careful to limit foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation — for women, no more than one drink a day.

No. 4: Chronic lower respiratory diseases

Chronic lung conditions — which include bronchitis and emphysema — also are a concern for women. To protect your respiratory health:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit. Also avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Steer clear of pollutants. Minimize exposure to chemicals and outdoor air pollution.
  • Prevent respiratory infections. Wash your hands often and get a yearly flu vaccine. Ask your doctor whether you need a pneumonia vaccine as well.

o. 5: Alzheimer’s disease

There’s no proven way to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, but consider taking these steps:

  • Manage chronic conditions. Conditions such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke and diabetes may increase the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.
  • Don’t smoke. Some research suggests a link between smoking and Alzheimer’s.
  • Include physical activity in your daily routine. Any movement counts.
  • Maintain social and mental fitness. Stay socially active. Practice mental exercises. Take steps to learn new things.

No. 6: Accidents

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of fatal accidents among women. To stay safe on the road, use common sense. Wear your seat belt. Follow the speed limit. Don’t drive under the influence of alcohol or any other substances, and don’t drive while sleepy.

No. 7: Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — affects the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to heart disease, eye problems, nerve damage and other complications. To prevent type 2 diabetes, get serious about your lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.

The bottom line

It’s important to understand common women’s health risks, but don’t feel intimidated. Instead, do whatever you can to lead a healthy lifestyle — including eating a healthy diet, staying physically active, quitting smoking and getting regular checkups. Simple preventive measures can go a long way toward reducing your health risks.

Preventing the Top Threats to MEN’S health

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/mens-health/MC00013

The biggest threats to men’s health can often be prevented. Here’s what you need to know to live a longer, healthier life.

By Mayo Clinic staff

Do you know the greatest threats to men’s health? The list is surprisingly short — and prevention pays off. Consider this top seven list of men’s health threats, compiled from statistics provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other leading organizations to reflect men’s health risks in the United States. Then get serious about reducing your risks.

No. 1: Heart disease

Heart disease is a leading men’s health threat. Take charge of heart health by making healthier lifestyle choices. For example:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit. It’s also important to avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Choose vegetables, fruits, whole grains, high-fiber foods and lean sources of protein, such as fish. Limit foods high in saturated fat and sodium.
  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Include physical activity in your daily routine. Choose sports or other activities you enjoy, from basketball to brisk walking.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Extra pounds increase the risk of heart disease.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. Too much alcohol can raise your blood pressure.
  • Manage stress. If you feel constantly on edge or under assault, your lifestyle habits may suffer. Take steps to reduce stress — or learn to deal with stress in healthy ways.

No. 2: Cancer

Various types of cancer are of particular concern to men, including lung cancer, skin cancer, prostate cancer and colorectal cancer. To reduce the risk of cancer, consider these general tips:

  • Don’t smoke. Using any type of tobacco puts you on a collision course with cancer. Avoiding exposure to secondhand smoke counts, too.
  • Maintain a healthy weight. Losing excess pounds — and keeping them off — may lower the risk of various types of cancer.
  • Get moving. In addition to helping you control your weight, physical activity on its own may lower the risk of certain types of cancer.
  • Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables. Although making healthy selections at the grocery store and at mealtime can’t guarantee cancer prevention, it may help reduce your risk.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. When you’re outdoors, cover up and use plenty of sunscreen.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation. The risk of various types of cancer — including cancer of the colon, lung, kidney and liver — increases with the amount of alcohol you drink and the length of time you’ve been drinking regularly.
  • Take early detection seriously. Consult your doctor for regular cancer screenings.

No. 3: Accidents

Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of fatal accidents among men. To stay safe on the road, use common sense. Wear your seat belt. Follow the speed limit. Don’t drive under the influence of alcohol or any other substances, and don’t drive while sleepy.

No. 4: Chronic lower respiratory diseases

Chronic lung conditions — which include bronchitis and emphysema — also are a concern for men. To protect your respiratory health:

  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke, ask your doctor to help you quit. Also avoid exposure to secondhand smoke.
  • Steer clear of pollutants. Minimize exposure to chemicals and outdoor air pollution.
  • Prevent respiratory infections. Wash your hands often and get a yearly flu vaccine. Ask your doctor whether you need a pneumonia vaccine as well.

No. 5: Stroke

You can’t control some stroke risk factors — such as family history, age and race — but you can control other contributing factors. For example:

  • Manage chronic conditions. If you have high cholesterol or high blood pressure, follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations. If you have diabetes, keep your blood sugar under control.
  • Don’t smoke. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit.
  • Make healthy lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet, being especially careful to limit foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.
  • Limit alcohol. If you choose to drink alcohol, do so only in moderation.

No. 6: Type 2 diabetes

Type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — affects the way your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Poorly controlled diabetes can lead to heart disease, eye problems, nerve damage and other complications. To prevent type 2 diabetes, get serious about your lifestyle choices. Eat a healthy diet. Include physical activity in your daily routine. If you’re overweight, lose excess pounds.

No. 7: Suicide

Suicide is another leading men’s health risk. An important risk factor for suicide among men is depression. If you have signs and symptoms of depression — such as feelings of sadness or unhappiness and loss of interest in normal activities — consult your doctor. Treatment is available. If you’re contemplating suicide, call for emergency medical help or go the nearest emergency room.

The bottom line

Understanding health risks is one thing. Taking action to reduce your risks is another. Start with healthy lifestyle choices — eating a healthy diet, staying physically active, quitting smoking, getting regular checkups and taking precautions in your daily activities. The impact may be greater than you’ll ever know.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

 Espanol

Bob Aronson Newheart de Bob es un receptor de trasplante cardiaco 2007, el fundador de Facebook, casi 2.500 Iniciativa miembro de Trasplante de Órganos y el autor de la mayoría de los blogs de donación / trasplante.

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor vea nuestro video “Gracias desde el fondo de mi corazón Donante” en http://www.organti.org Este video fue producido para promover la donación de órganos por lo que es libre y no se necesita permiso para su uso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

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