Blog Archives

DEA Bullying Denies Relief to Those With Chronic Pain


By Bob Aronson

morphine is the best medicine 

I suffer from Chronic Pain and do millions of others and it’s getting more and more difficult to get any relief from it because two federal agencies are bullying physicians.

My neck and shoulder pain started after my heart transplant and some of it was directly related to the position of my arms while I was in surgery.  Many transplant recipients suffer the same fate, but transplant or not if a person is in pain relief should be no farther away than your doctor’s office.  It’s not!

I have received dozens of messages from pain sufferers since I published the previous two posts on the subject of chronic pain and physicians who simply will not prescribe narcotics (1. Why You Can’t Get Pain Meds http://tinyurl.com/knltszh   and (2. Suffering from Chronic Pain? Here’s what you need to know http://tinyurl.com/lzy8o22 and that’s what prompted me to write this third blog on the subject. I’m angry, frustrated and helpless.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) mission (more on that later)dea badge is essentially to stop the production and sale of illegal drugs in America. Their “War on Drugs” is well known and it has recently expanded from the poppy fields to the practice of medicine and to pharmacies. 

A few years ago Florida was the state of the “Pill Mills,” places where almost anyone could get powerful prescription pain killers just by showing up at the Doctor’s office. So flagrant were the violations that the DEA had a pill mill 2heyday of arrests and convictions but like many federal agencies they didn’t know when to stop.  Not satisfied with putting the “Pill Mill” docs out of business, they turned to the regular physicians and warned them of investigations and loss of license if they were found to be prescribing narcotic pain meds to people who weren’t in pain.

Many physicians who saw the DEA overreaction to the “Pill Mills” overreacted themselves and decided not to prescribe opioids (narcotics or controlled substances) to anyone.  The result is that many who suffer from chronic pain that cannot be relieved by anything other than narcotics can’t get them and are suffering needlessly.

How chilling is the DEA’s action.  Try this on for size.  44% of American doctors confess that a fear of a police or DEA investigation into their practice influenced the way that they prescribed medications to chronic pain patients. This according to a poll of doctors for the Center for Addiction and Substance Abuse.

The DEA’s actions are harming patients and maybe it is because their mission is the most convoluted, overly broad, confusing detailed mess you’ll ever see. 

Here are three of examples of Mission Statement excellence

  • TED: Spreading Ideas. (2 words)
  • Smithsonian: The increase and diffusion of knowledge. (6 words)
  • USO lifts the spirits of America’s troops and their families. (9 words)
  • DEA (347 words)

(This is only part of it you can see the rest at http://www.justice.gov/dea/about/mission.shtml)

The mission of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is to enforce the controlled substances laws and regulations of the United States and bring to the criminal and civil justice system of the United States, or any other competent jurisdiction, those organizations and principal members of organizations, involved in the gDEA arrestrowing, manufacture, or distribution of controlled substances appearing in or destined for illicit traffic in the United States; and to recommend and support non-enforcement programs aimed at reducing the availability of illicit controlled substances on the domestic and international markets.

They wrote a mission statement that sets them up to invade anyone at any time for any reason.  If they were legitimately concerned with stopping the flow of illegal drugs their mission statement probably could have said. “The Mission of the DEA is to stop the production and sale of illegal drugs in the United States” (19 words).  Instead, they chose to write a book that gives them the authority to assume more authority.

Essentially what the DEA is talking about is Opioids so let’s start with a definition. opioids What is an Opioid?  According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse opioids are medications that relieve pain. They reduce the intensity of pain signals reaching the brain and affect those brain areas controlling emotion, which diminishes the effects of a painful stimulus.

Medications that fall within this class include hydrocodone (e.g., Vicodin), oxycodone (e.g., Oxycontin, Percocet), morphine (e.g., Kadian, Avinza), codeine, and related drugs. Hydrocodone products are the most commonly prescribed for a variety of painful conditions, including dental and injury-related pain. Morphine is often used before and after surgical procedures to alleviate severe pain. Codeine, on the other hand, is often prescribed for mild pain. In addition to their pain relieving properties, some of these drugs—codeine and diphenoxylate (Lomotil) for example—can be used to relieve coughs and severe diarrhea.

pain cartoonIn their zeal to accomplish the impossible mission the DEA has now ventured into the practice of medicine a discipline for which they are not qualified nor are they welcome.  As a result, thousands upon thousands of Americans are suffering incredible pain.  They can’t get relief because their physicians have been intimidated by the DEA and to a lesser degree the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).  We have here a sort of medical paradox, the feds want to practice medicine and the medical doctors are afraid to. 

This report from the Reuters news agency pretty much sums up the way many physicians are reacting to DEA’s bullying: “Many physicians have increased patient monitoring, which means more urine tests, more documentation, and more frequent “pill count” checks, where patients must go to the prescriber’s office with their pill bottles to prove they have not sold or misused their medication.

“Every hour of the day I have concerns I’ll be audited, that my ability to take care of my patients and my family can be taken away, and I’m as legitimate as you can get,” said one frazzled physicianprescriber who has a private orthopedic practice in Florida. “You’re constantly watching over your shoulder and it takes a toll,” he told Reuters news.

Safety and security are one thing but when a law enforcement agency decides to run rampant over a legitimate segment of the private sector, someone, somewhere ought to stand up and take notice.

In their long but terribly unsuccessful effort to control illegal drugs the DEA has now focused their attention on prescription drugs and in particular those few physicians (most of them were in Florida) who wrote narcotics prescriptions for nearly anyone who wanted them.  And…they’ve been successful. Most of the pill mills are gone, babrams tankut the DEA is like a runaway Abrams tank and is now rumbling over the medical profession.

In typical federal overreaction to the “Pill Mill” crisis, the DEA decided to crack down on all physicians by letting them know that they were being watched and that they had better be damned sure they were prescribing narcotics for real pain and not to junkies.

The overreaction by the Feds was met by an equal overreaction by many physicians.  They just quit prescribing opioid (narcotic) pain meds because they don’t want the hassle. Both the feds and the docs seem to have forgotten us patients.  We are the ones who get the short, sharp, infected end of the stick.

Not satisfied with their efforts, but impressed with their nearly effortless intimidation of the medical profession the DEA then decided that while they concentrated on powerful narcotics like oxycontin and oxycodone the effort should not stop there.  They also bullying imagewanted restrictions on a lower level of painkillers as well so they crossed the street and bullied the FDA into telling docs they had better be careful when they prescribe Vicodin and Lortabs.  Both contain hydrocodone and are usually combined with over the counter analgesics like aspirin or Tylenol.

The result?  If you suffer from chronic pain you are going to have a very difficult time getting any drug containing a narcotic or other controlled substance.  The medical profession has been scared to cause many docs to refuse to prescribe narcotics or any other controlled substance including drugs like Valium which is non-narcotic but still a controlled substance.

Many so-called “Pain Clinics” will not prescribe narcotics at all for any reason. Instead they will look for “root causes” and try a raft of anti-inflammatory and other treatments.  And, to be fair, in some cases those “other treatments” work, but while the pain experts are searching for non-opioid solutions, the patient suffers. I know I’m one of them.  When I asked one pain clinic doc for narcotics after repeated failed attempts to control my pain he said,”I can’t do that, see your primary.”  The “can’t” part of the answer is pure BS.  Won’t is the correct word to use — won’t because he has been intimidated by the feds.  I endured weeks of agonizing, debilitating pain because they refused to prescribe narcotics even though nothing else was working.

There are some docs who have the courage to practice medicine despite thewe are watching you fact that two powerful federal agencies are threatening them with a minimum of being investigated and a maximum of license revocation.  Physicians feel as though they are constantly being watched.

My primary care doc understands that I really do suffer from chronic pain and that I have tried other approaches that have failed.  Despite that, to protect his license he monitors my use of the Oxycodone he prescribes very carefully.  He requires that once a month, when it is time for a prescription refill he sees me in his office where he reviews my case, questions me about my pain level and then reminds me of the dangers of opioids even though I have never sought an increase in dosage and am not an addict.. 

I still believe that while the DEA and the FDA are being heavy handed, physicians who are licensed to practice medicine and fail to prescribe drugs that have been proven to be effective must bear some of the responsibility for the suffering many chronic pain patients are experiencing.  

eyes in the darkReminiscent of so many tyrannical regimes the DEA absolves itself of any responsibility for the suffering they have caused among patients with chronic pain.  Here’s what they told The National Pain Report.  

“The agency is not trying to limit access to opioid painkillers. And if legitimate pain medication prescriptions are not being written or filled, it’s the fault of doctors and pharmacists, not the government,” said DEA spokesman Rusty Payne. 

“We’re not doctors. We’re regulators and enforcers of the law. If something is prescribed for a legitimate medical purpose, we’re certainly not going to get in the way.  If a pharmacy chooses not to fill a prescription for someone, that’s their decision. It’s not the DEA’s decision,” he said.

To me that’s a whole lot like a cop stopping you for no good reason, warning you about speeding and then telling you that he and other cops are watching you very carefully to be sure you abide by all the rules.  Then, if due to fear you just quit driving they say, “That was his choice, we didn’t tell him to stop driving.”

So our bottom line is this. If you have chronic pain and all the non-narcotic remedies don’t work you are going to have to grin and bear it for a while.  No physician in this environment is going to write opioid prescription for someone who walks in from the street complaining of pain.  You are going to have to prove it.  Your chances of getting relief maybe better from your primary care physician but bring evidence of your pain

  • X-rays, MRIs, CT scans
  •  Written diagnosis, prognosis, treatment and instructions from other physicians or emergency departments
  •  Prescription records
  •  Police or other reports if you’ve had an injury
  • Reports from physical therapists or Chiropractors
  • Anything else that will help prove your claim that you have chronic pain and that opioids may be your only relief.

If you want a primary care physician to help you, it is going to take a little time to build a relationship and he or she may even want you to repeat some tests you have already undergone.  Be prepared to hurt for a while because it is unlikely that any physician you have not seen before will prescribe a narcotic pain killer after only one or two appointments.  That’s what our friends at DEA have done for us.

If all of this really gets under your skin, call, write, email, text, holler at or visit your Congressional Representative, Your Senator and/or The President of the United States.

-0-

bob minus Jay full shotBob Aronson is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder and primary author of the blogs on this site and the founder of Facebook’s over 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative group.

Now retired and living in Jacksonville, Florida with his wife Robin he spends his time advocating for patients with end stage diseases and for organ recipients.  He is also active in helping his wife with her art business at art festivals and on her Rockin Robin Prints site on Etsy. 

Bob is a former journalist, Governor’s Communication Director and international communications consultant.

 

 

Why Some Docs Won’t Prescribe Narcotics no Matter How Bad the Pain


Having Trouble Getting Pain Killers?  Here’s why.

Some Florida physicians are mighty gun shy  about prescribing narcotic painkillers for their patients and many of us who need them are being made to suffer unnecessarily.lots ofdrugs

I have osteoarthritis in my neck, back and a few other places.  Osteoarthritis is very painful.  I also get severe muscle spasms in my neck and shoulders.  The pain from the arthritis and the spasms is so intense it is beyond description.  It is get on the floor, pound your fists and scream pain…the kind that makes you cry and beg for relief, but for a lot of us here in Florida there is no relief.  Some physicians will go to almost any extreme to avoid prescribing drugs like Oxycontin, Oxycodone, Dilaudid  or almost any other controlled substance.

The drugs I mentioned are very powerful and addictive narcotics. Oxycontin is a time release drug, Oxycodone (the same drug) acts immediately and Dilaudid acts immediately and is said to be more powerful than morphine.  They are heavily controlled substances and should be.  They are dangerous drugs.

Florida used to be the place that prescribed those drugs for the rest of the nation.  In 2010, 90 of the top 100 oxycodone-purchasing doctors in the United States resided in Florida but then the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) cracked down — hard and many of the major clinics overreacted.  (read the full story on Florida’s narcotics prescription problem here http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/2013-04-06/news/os-prescription-drug-epidemic-2013-20130406_1_prescription-drugs-central-florida-certain-drugs )

Deaths attributed to opioid analgesics now exceed those involving heroin. By 2010, enough opioid analgesics were sold to medicate every American adult with a typical dose of 5 mg of hydrocodone every 4 hours for 1 month – See more at: http://www.pharmacytimes.com/news/Is-Floridas-Oxycodone-Problem-Under-Control#sthash.1sMZdorU.dpuf

It wasn’t only physician who were a problem, the monster drugstore chain Walgreens was involved, too.  http://tinyurl.com/l2t7ohc   The U.S. DEA said, corporate officials at Walgreens implemented bonus programs that incentivized pharmacists to sell oxycodone and ignore “red flags” that customers were abusing the popular painkiller, which leads us to our current dilemma.walgreens

Chances are if you are post-surgical, need a root canal, have cancer or a broken leg your physician will prescribe whatever you need.  But if you have chronic back pain, arthritis, muscle spasms or any other kind of pain that is not easily verifiable you are likely going to have trouble getting narcotics in some clinics.

I should point out here that I despise narcotics.  I am, since 1982, a recovering alcoholic.  I have to be extremely careful about addictive substances but I have tried virtually everything that modern medicine has to offer and narcotics seem to be the only way to get some relief from the absolutely debilitating pain I suffer on a daily basis.  My doctors, specialists in my particular ills have so far refused to provide me with any pain relief other than various forms of aspirin or Tylenol.  They are always careful to add that I can get pain relief from my “Primary.”

In fairness I must agree with their assessment that narcotics only hide the pain, they do not cure it.  I agree that physicians should look for the root cause and attempt to treat the pain by other means including physical therapy but in the time between the diagnosis and the ultimate treatment narcotics can provide relief.  No one should have to live with almost unbearable pain.  It is in that period between diagnosis and cure or treatment that narcotics have a legitimate place.  And…sometimes, however rare that may be, sometimes narcotics are the only answer to chronic pain.  Physicians have the training and the diagnostic tools to determine who has real pain and who is seeking to feed a habit or to sell prescription drugs illegally.

When a person has surgery or breaks a leg it is quite obvious that pain killers are needed and they are most often given…that is not the problem.  The problem lies with those who suffer from chronic pain…pain that cannot always be seen on an x-ray, CT scan or MRI.  Their pain is just as real as that suffered by someone with broken bones but getting relief from the discomfort is far more difficult because of the irresponsible behavior of a very small number of physicians and companies like Walgreens.

So what do you do if you are in pain and need a painkiller?  Well, you can get relief but it will take some legwork and it won’t be easy.

In order to get a prescription for a pain killer now in Florida you first have to convince a physician you need it and that is not easy.  Pain is one of those symptoms that is hard to measure.  Most physicians won’t prescribe narcotics for new patients…they’d like to get to know you first.  The real tragedy, though is that if you go to a major medical center like Mayo and need a powerful painkiller they will likely tell you to get it from your primary care physician.pain  Mayo is mostly a specialty clinic and while they have a few primary care physicians the number is small.

My primary care physician is not a Mayo Doc so when I tell him “Mayo says you should prescribe the narcotic,” the primary care doc says, “Why me?  They have all the fancy diagnostic tools, they came up with the diagnosis and they have all of your medical records, they should also prescribe the drugs.”

And to me that makes perfectly good sense.  Why should the Primary care doc put his license on the line?  Fortunately my primary, a first class professional who I have known for a long time has agreed to take care of me but the way the law is written, monitored and enforced makes him very nervous.

First the physician has to see and examine you to determine if the claim is legitimate.  Then he/she has to write the prescription.  They cannot call or fax the prescription in to a pharmacy as they can with most other drugs. When narcotics are involved the patient must hand deliver the script to the pharmacist and there are no automatic refills.  When you run out and need more you have to call your physician again for an appointment, have him or her write another prescription and again take it to the pharmacy.prescription

I understand completely why the law has to be so tough.  People were making millions of dollars on prescription drugs and thousands, maybe millions of people were becoming addicts as a result.  But for those of us who only want pain relief it’s a different story.  Somehow there should be an accommodation for patients who really are in pain…and especially those of us who are not quite as agile as others and sometimes have to depend on others to get us to the doctor and to the pharmacy.

This is a very important issue and should be dealt with in a reasonable way but when the DEA is breathing down your neck and lawsuits are possible the medical profession retreats and patient care becomes a secondary issue.  That’s not right.

I want to pause here for a moment to point out that Mayo has saved my life more than once.  It was at Mayo in Jacksonville that I got a heart transplant in 2007 and my care there is beyond reproach.  I have nothing but respect for the Mayo team and the manner in which they practice medicine but being as it is the place where I get 99.9% of my care they become part of this story.  When I have had surgery there or was seen for an injury there was no hesitation in providing me with the narcotics I needed to aid in the healing process.   It is when you have pain like mine that you hear the words, “See your primary (meaning see your primary care physician).”

Recently in a clinic visit I asked a physician who was intimately familiar with my condition if he could write me a prescription for a narcotic painkiller being as nothing else was working and it would be some time before I could get into physical therapy.  His terse response as he walked out of the room was, “I can’t do that, see your primary.”  The fact is he can do that…he didn’t want to.

Sometimes the arrogance of physicians is beyond belief.   They deny you pain relief and schedule physical therapy three weeks later.  What do they expect will happen in those three weeks?  Don’t they understand or even care that it will be three weeks of sanity challenging pain?  My sense is they don’t care about your pain — they are far more worried about protecting their licenses.

If the Hippocratic oath really says, “First do no harm,” the physician who denies relief to someone in real provable pain is violating his/her oath because by denying medication, they are doing great bodily and psychological harm.  Shame on them.  As far as I know there is no law, rule or restriction that requires narcotics prescriptions be written by primary care physicians only.  “See your primary” is code for, “The best way to stay out of trouble is to avoid writing any prescriptions for narcotics by passing the buck to primary care physicians in private practice.”

Physicians should have the guts to say, “My patient is in pain and I’m going to prescribe something to help him.” My experience, though, is that many of them would rather pass the buck to another physician who is also afraid of losing his or her license.

Have you had an experience like this?  If so I’d like to hear from you. I fully intend to write more on this issue and will do so not only from my experience but will also draw on what I’m hearing from other patients like myself who have provable, medically verifiable pain and are candidates for narcotic pain relief but are being denied treatment.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our new music video “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” on YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs.  This video is free to anyone who wants to use it and no permission is needed. 

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

En Espanol

Puede comentar en el espacio proporcionado o por correo electrónico sus pensamientos a mí en bob@baronson.org. Y – por favor, difundir la palabra acerca de la necesidad inmediata de más donantes de órganos. No hay nada que puedas hacer lo que es de mayor importancia. Si usted convence a una persona de ser donante de órganos y tejidos puede salvar o afectar positivamente a más de 60 vidas. Algunas de esas vidas pueden ser personas que conoces y amas.

Por favor, consulte nuestro nuevo video musical “Dawn Anita The Gift of Life” en https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eYFFJoHJwHs YouTube. Este video es libre para cualquier persona que quiera usarlo y no se necesita permiso.

Si quieres correr la voz acerca de la donación de órganos personalmente, tenemos otra presentación de PowerPoint para su uso libre y sin permiso. Sólo tienes que ir a http://www.organti.org y haga clic en “Life Pass It On” en el lado izquierdo de la pantalla y luego sólo tienes que seguir las instrucciones. Esto no es un espectáculo independiente, sino que necesita un presentador pero es profesionalmente producida y sonido hechos. Si usted decide usar el programa le enviaré una copia gratuita de mi libro electrónico, “Cómo obtener un pie” O “que le ayudará con habilidades de presentación. Sólo tiene que escribir a bob@baronson.org y por lo general usted recibirá una copia del mismo día.

Además … hay más información sobre este sitio de blogs sobre otros donación / trasplante temas. Además nos encantaría que te unas a nuestro grupo de Facebook, la Iniciativa de Trasplante de Órganos Cuantos más miembros que obtenemos mayor será nuestra influencia con los tomadores de decisiones.

“His” Heart, My Life, My Story


I wrote this account of my life since receiving a heart transplant in hopes that others will benefit from my experiences.  Most of you who will have transplants will have a far easier time of it than I did.  You must remember that I was 68 years old when I had mine and that alone can make a huge difference in recovery time and other factors as well.  If any of you have any questions after reading this please contact me personally at bob@baronson.org.

Being a transplant recipient is an amazing experience.  I simply cannot describe what the feeling is like knowing that one of the parts you were born has been discarded and replaced with one belonging to someone else who in all likelihood died…except for the organ that is keeping you alive.

I don’t know who my donor was.  I only know he was about 30 years old when he died and he was from South Carolina.  I have written to my donor family but not heard from them so I assume they prefer to remain anonymous and I understand and accept that.

Everyone who has ever had a transplant has had a unique experience that nothing else in life can match.  Each day I am struck by the awareness that the heart I was born with, that kept me alive for 68 years no longer beats within my chest.  It died.  I didn’t.  Wow!

Often when I lie in bed I feel the rhythmic thumping that kept someone else alive for 30 years is now doing the same for me.  “His” heart is my life.  “His” heart pumps my blood, in my body to my brain and allows me to think, to live, love and enjoy life. “His” heart, not mine.

My donor has given me a lot but his greatest gift is allowing me the extra time to be with my wonderful wife Robin.

In 1995 after collapsing in a parking ramp am rushed to a hospital, I was diagnosed with dilated idiopathic cardiomyopathy and was told that someday I might need a heart transplant.  As the owner of a communications consulting business I was very active and travelled a great deal both domestically and internationally, but slowly my health began to deteriorate.  Always the optimist I adjusted and slowed down a little but not so anyone would really notice.

Then in 1996 my wife was diagnosed with lung cancer and I ignored my condition while we dealt with hers which included many chemotherapy and radiation sessions.  After a long and courageous battle with that terrible disease she succumbed in November of 1998.  We had been married for 35 years.  It was a devastating time and at age 59 I felt lost, alone and without hope as I began to feel the effects of my own condition.

About a year later I met Robin Diffie and as we got to know each other I felt my life just might come back together after all, but my version of the sword of Damocles, cardiomyopathy, continued its swing through my life as my heart function continued to fall with a resultant decrease in my ability to function.

In 2000 Robin and I were married in Eagan, Minnesota but by then the condition which would later require a heart transplant was becoming debilitating, when I travelled I began to ask for wheelchair service in airports and Robin began traveling with me to make sure I got one and to act as my “pusher.”

Cardiomyopathy kind of sneaks up on you and kicks your butt softly at first but then harder and harder.  The effect of the disease is measured by ones “Ejection Fraction” (EF).  A normal heart will pump out about 60% of the blood it contains every time it beats.  As the disease progresses the EF keeps going down and the heart enlarges in order to store the blood that doesn’t’ get ejected.  My heart was getting very large and by 2006 my EF was around 10% and decreasing.  Clearly I was dying and too sick to work.  Sometimes I could barely walk a few feet without having to stop to rest.  My heart was just barely pumping enough blood to keep me alive.  Reluctantly I made the decision to retire.

It was then that we decided to move to Jacksonville, Florida and we did so for two reasons.  1) Moving there offered the greatest likelihood of getting a heart.  My research indicated that the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville had a wonderful record in organ procurement and transplantation.  2) It was an easy decision because Jacksonville is Robin’s home town and her entire family is there.  I still question Robin’s sanity in marrying a dying man but no matter I am grateful for whatever bug struck her and caused the instability.

After undergoing the battery of tests that are required to qualify for a transplant, I was finally approved and placed on the national list on August 8th of 2007.  I had resigned myself to either a very long wait or, I thought, no heart at all because of my age.  It had already been twelve very long years since I was diagnosed with a fatal heart disease.  I thought that at age 68 it was unlikely that I would get a heart and if I did it wouldn’t be anytime soon — but I got lucky.

Only 13 days after being listed I got the call from Mayo Clinic Transplant Cardiologist Dr. Jeffrey Hosenpud that he “might” have a heart for me.  He did.  I got one and August 21st 2007 goes down in history as my “other” birthday.

My recovery from the transplant was difficult to say the least.  It took four years before I finally felt good again.  I quit smoking in 1991 but the 37 year habit had already taken its toll, I had Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD).  That’s a disease of the lungs that can best be described as feeling as though you are breathing through a straw…try that some time.  COPD is bad enough but when you get pneumonia on top of it you have another life threatening situation.  Well, I got pneumonia shortly after my surgery and was hospitalized again but the recovery was very slow and touch and go before I slowly regained my strength.  I now know that another bout with pneumonia could kill me so I try to be pretty careful about what I expose myself to.

I no sooner recovered from the pneumonia virus than I was stricken with indescribable absolutely excruciating pain….pain so severe that sometimes I would just sit and cry. Part of the pain, I’m told, was the result of the way I was positioned during my surgery.  Apparently your left arm is in a strange position in order to allow the surgeon unobstructed access to the chest cavity, but a transplant takes a long time and it seems that my arm needed different medical attention than was delivered.

The pain in my left arm right down to my wrist and fingers was awful but then just when I thought it couldn’t get worse, it did.  The pain spread to both shoulders, my neck and lower back for and went on for months.  Torn rotator cuffs were part of the reason but much of the pain came from unknown causes, perhaps it was the way I was sleeping or  maybe the lack of proper exercise and maybe because of an old auto accident.  We’ll never know the exact cause but it was finally resolved with a combination of physical therapy and Oxycontin the potent, addictive pain killer, and addictive it was.

I’ve been a recovering alcoholic since 1982.  I understand addiction and I understood quite well that I had become dependent on the narcotic.  I no longer really needed it for the pain for which it was prescribed, I needed it for the pain caused by the withdrawal you experience between “hits.”  When you are taking pain killers there’s a simple question you must ask yourself every time you reach for a pill.  “Am I taking this because I need it for pain or am I taking it because I want it?”  If you are truthful with yourself and the answer is the latter, you have a problem.  I had a problem.  By addict standards I wasn’t taking much Oxycontin, only about 30-40 milligrams a day, but it was enough for me to know I needed the drug, needed it not to get high…I needed it to feel normal.  That’s what happens to every drunk and junkie…they ultimately drink, shoot or take pills just to try to feel normal.  Often the first high you have, is the last one.

Having been through chemical dependency treatment in 1982 I knew what I had to do but I also knew I couldn’t do it cold turkey.  I found a highly reputable pain clinic that specialized in addiction and started going there.  They immediately took me off of Oxycontin and put me on Suboxone another addictive drug but one that is used to slowly help people through the painful withdrawal that comes with quitting.  It took several months but it worked and I was Oxycontin free but, sorry, the story doesn’t end there.

You’d think that after having survived cardiomyopathy, getting a heart transplant, beating terrible pain and withdrawing from an addictive drug I would finally feel better.  Unfortunately the light at the end of my tunnel was an oncoming train that hit me hard and almost had me down for the count because for no explainable reason I fell into a deep, dark depression that lasted for a couple of years.

Each day I would awaken, head to my favorite recliner in a corner of the den and sit there in the dark drinking coffee and watching TV.  I was nearly a zombie.  Some days I wouldn’t even shower and I didn’t want to see or talk to anyone.  That was my life day after day, week after week for a couple of years.   Depression is one of those diseases where you don’t know how bad off you are until you are no longer bad off.  The only thing that gave me any hope each day was maintaining my presence on the Facebook group I started, Organ Transplant Initiative and my blog on WordPress, Bob’s Newheart.  While I knew I needed professional help I was so depressed I didn’t’ care if I got it so I kept putting it off.  Finally with Robin’s gentle prodding I went back to Mayo and began treatment but you don’t beat depression overnight or even in a few months.  Sometimes it takes a considerable amount of trial and error before the right treatment is found.  That came right around my four year post surgery mark but not until i had lost 75 pounds from lack of appetite.  i was left weak but finally energized and optimistic again.

Through all of that Robin, the lunatic who married a dying man, was steady as a rock. She had her hands full running two businesses and our home plus being my caregiver.  I’ll never know how she did it and kept her wits about her but she never flinched.  She is the most amazing, compassionate and competent human being I have ever encountered.  She is an unflappable optimist who doesn’t have a selfish bone in her body.  I don’t know why I was so blessed to find this woman but  as the man said, “Somebody up there likes me.”

That takes us to today…five plus years later and I feel wonderful but most importantly I get to spend time with Robin.  If a physician could have written a prescription for love, happiness and contentment it would simply have said, “Robin.”  It is only because of my donor that I am getting to spend time with this wonderful, gracious, smart, talented, funny and super woman.  The heart of a stranger has allowed us to really get to know each other.  There is no greater gift my donor could have given me and yes, that’s selfish but in this case I think selfish is OK.

Like many recipients my life has changed in other ways as well.  Because of a transplant I’m a different person.  I hope I’m a better person.  I know I appreciate life a great deal more than I ever did before, but it is not only my life I appreciate, it is everyone’s life.  When you experience death or near death, “life” takes on a whole new meaning.  My reaction to being a transplant recipient is that I owe my donor big time.  While I can’t do anything for him directly I can honor his memory by doing everything in my power to help others live.  That’s why I am such an outspoken donation/transplantation activist.

While science generally rejects the notion, some recipients feel they have taken on some of the characteristics of their donor.  I can’t say what my donor’s characteristics were because I didn’t know him but my life has changed as a result of having his heart.  He may well be the influence behind some of the changes I have experienced which include:

  • I am much less selfish than I was before and spend as much time as I can trying to help others.
  • I am much less concerned with material things than I used to be.  “Appearances” aren’t important anymore.  I don’t have to have a new car, wear the best clothes or get recognition.  I simply don’t care about those things.
  • I am far more passionate about causes I believe in like fairness, equality and justice.  I particularly feel a need to help the economically disadvantaged, the disabled, the sick, the elderly and, of course — children who suffer so many indignities of which they should not even be aware, never mind being forced to experience them.
  • I am more of a peacemaker.  In the past I was a warrior, a bulldozer who when advocating for a cause would show my commitment by rolling over those who disagreed and sometimes belittling them in the process.  Now I believe in finding common ground and forming friendships despite serious disagreements.
  • I am much less self-centered than I used to be.  I have come to accept who I am and as a result can concentrate on the needs of others.
  • I have always enjoyed learning but it has almost become an obsession since my transplant.  My thirst for knowledge about a wide variety of things knows no bounds.  I can’t get enough information about the wonders around us like the sun and the stars and the miracles, medical and otherwise that we experience every day.
  • Working with my hands has always been enjoyable for me but since my transplant I have become addicted to woodwork.  I’m not the Michelangelo of woodworking, hell I’m not even a Barney Fife but I am determined to get better at it.  Unfortunately it is my friends and family who must suffer receiving my woodworking “gifts” and then acting as though they like them.

Being a transplant recipient is an amazing experience.  It is one of which I am always aware and I mean always that I have someone else’ heart.  There is no time in my waking hours that I am not aware that I am alive because a generous stranger give me his heart.  I owe him and his family more than I could ever repay no matter what efforts I make for the rest of my life.

If you, the reader, are an organ donor, let me thank you on behalf of the unknown lives you may save as a result of your selfless action.  If you are not an organ donor, please consider it carefully.  You can save or enhance the lives of up to 60 people just by signing up and you can do that so easily.  Just go to www.donatelife.net and follow the directions.  Then, tell your family what you’ve done so there is no chance that anyone will object when the time comes to fulfill your commitment.

Earlier in this story I mentioned my Facebook Group and Blog. Let me take just a moment to explain how they came to be.  Just a couple of months after my transplant I got a call from Mayo asking if I’d be interested in starting a Facebook Organ donation group and in writing a blog.  I knew what neither were but decided I needed something to do during my recuperation and said, “Yes.”  With Mayo’s help I got started immediately.

That was the beginning or Facebook’s Organ Transplant Initiative group (OTI) and Bob’s Newheart blog on WordPress www.bobsnewheart.wordpress.com .  OTI now has almost 2,500 members and I’ve posted 140 blogs on donation/transplantation issues that have been read by over 100,000 people in at least 20 countries.  I believe that I was given my new heart to do this and it has become my new passion.

None of this would be possible without all you wonderful people who helped to make OTI a success and who read my “Stuff” on WordPress.  By offering your kind words, thoughts and deeds you are doing a great service to those who suffer while waiting for organs and those who are recovering from receiving them, never mind the caregivers and others who are so critical to the donation/transplantation process.  Words cannot express my fondness for all of you and my gratitude for your involvement.  All I can say is, thank you from the bottom of my donor’s heart.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Hepatitis C, Peter and Ashley. A Love Story.


For the past week or so I’ve been writing about Hepatitis C, mostly in clinical terms.  Today we begin to tell the human side of the story, the side that shows how devastating this disease can be and how it can bring out the very best in people.  It is the story of a Boston couple — each has the disease.  One far more seriously than the other.

Peter and Ashley Curran are my friends as a result of Facebook and Organ Transplant Initiative .  They are two of the dearest people I know not only because of how much they love each other but also because they are friends to all who are suffering from Hepatitis C, their caregivers and to everyone else in the donation/transplantation community.  These are two genuine, kind and loving people who face incredible adversity on a daily basis and never ask for anything.

The story you are about to read was written by Ashley at my request about her beloved Peter.  She writes only of Peter’s disease but doesn’t even begin to touch on the many other hardships they have faced nor those they are facing on a daily basis.  Ashley and Peter don’t have much,  but they have each other and by God in my book that makes them the richest people on earth.

If ever there was a story of love and compassion and of giving yes, giving (Ash and Peter give till it hurts) it is the Curran story.  Please, if you pray, say one or two for Peter and Ashley.  God gets distracted once in a while with all that’s going on in the world so let’s give him a nudge and remind him that Peter and Ashley could use a little of his grace.  It is people like Ashley and Peter who will get left behind as our national safety net gets ragged, torn and frayed.

More people in the United States now die from hepatitis C each year than from AIDS, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. More than 3.2 million Americans are currently infected with hepatitis C and the really bad news is that most people who have it don’t’ know it.

Let’s start with a definition.

According to the Mayo Clinic Hepatitis C is an infection caused by a virus that attacks the liver and leads to inflammation. Most people infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV) have no symptoms. In fact, most people don’t know they have the hepatitis C infection until liver damage shows up, decades later, during routine medical tests.

Hepatitis C, Peter and Ashley.  A Love Story.

Written by Ashley Tenczar Curran

“You are going to need a transplant, your liver function is at about 10 percent”. I heard the words over the phone as my husband Peter and I were having our morning coffee. He had gestured for me to come over to the phone to listen in, and the words will never be extinguished from my mind.  I did not know then, in my shock and disbelief, that a shadow had fallen.

Peter and I met in 2000, a year that I was finally leaving my devastating drug addiction behind, and starting over. I had moved into a rooming house in South Boston, where Peter had been a tenant for about 7 years.  I wasn’t looking for love, especially in THIS wrong place. An overcrowded, “6 adults sharing the same bathroom” illegal “sober house” as it was advertised had enticed me because it was in good old “Southie”.

As I moved in, and was trying to carry my computer with one hand, doing a disastrous job of it, I heard a voice say “need some help?”  I realize how stupid this sounds, but I married Peter that instant.  He was 20 years older than me, and not my type at all. Laid back, calm, patient, and not overly talkative. I am the opposite.  He helped me plug in my computer, and left. I had been hit by some type of Divine thunderbolt, and I had not felt that feeling in a very long time.   We were facing insurmountable odds. He was just getting clean, tired of being “sick and tired”, and I was fresh out of a treatment program.
By all reasoning, we should have spent one week together and never seen each other again.

We should have died when we relapsed one time, several months after we met, to “try it one more time”, as if we had not destroyed out lives enough.  All I remember is waking up with a needle in my arm, and seeing Peter on the floor , with a needle in his arm.  We talked the next day, and loved each other enough to realize that we would lose each other if we used even one more time.  We finally, after some 15 years pursuing recovery, were unselfish enough to lay it down, and never return.

But the past always comes into the present, it is inevitable. I had been diagnosed with Hepatitis C, like most people I know, young and old, who have ever used a needle while doing drugs.  It is an epidemic of unimaginable proportions.
My virus was “undetectable” and remains that way to this day, 12+ years later.  Peter did not fare so well.

When we first started dating, I was amazed to listen to stories from other addicts, both active and in recovery, telling me that Peter is the kindest and most patient person they have ever met. I say this NOT for the purpose of this story, but my husband has some kind of way about him that instantly puts people at ease.  When my best friend Michelle overdosed in the room above ours, we tried to bring her back, and I wanted to kill the man who had given her the dope. Everyone who was there wanted to hang this man.   Everyone except Peter. He got the man some soda, gave him a cigarette, and sat him down to ask him what exactly had happened.

I remember the guy saying “Why are you being so nice to me?”

I have tried to model my behavior after my husband’s, being honest almost to a fault, and at the same time I am angry that I am not the one who is sick, that he , the patient and loving one has to be the one to go through the horrors of 22 medications several times a day, 3 years so far on the transplant list, (UNOS), and very little family support  (They were attentive and supportive at first, but now that the drama has settled, and they know it could be many more years before Peter gets his Gift of Life, they have gone on with their lives, and do not even invite him to family events anymore)
Peter does not get angry.

This is how I know that God will give him a transplant. This is not wishful thinking, because if you knew Peter, truly knew him, then you would know this also. He has a higher purpose, and God is not done with him yet.  He met a nurse, albeit a “disgraced” one, (me), who is 20 years younger than him, and who loved him from the first time she clamped eyes on him. He is my “Brad Pitt”, even in his weakened state.  I find I love him more , the sicker he gets.  The fight he puts up, the appointments, 4 in the past 2 weeks, and the humility he shows, the polite character he prides himself on, causing doctors and nurses to say over and over again “I wish I had 100 of HIM!”

Hepatitis C is overlooked. That is a FACT. So many young people are being diagnosed right as I type this, and the organ transplant lists, particularly the liver, are getting longer and longer. People are dying from a disease that is completely preventable, and that has a vaccination available!  Soon we will find that our young people are gravely ill, (we can see it now), and that scares me.  Peter said if he had a choice, he would give his liver transplant to a young person, as he has lived his life.

A lot of people think that “junkies” don’t deserve transplants, because “they did it to themselves!”

Well, to that I say “so cancer patients who chain smoked for years don’t deserve chemo and radiation, and costly experimental procedures because THEY “did it” to themselves?  So many diseases ARE the result of something “we have done wrong”.

The real shame is the stigma that society attaches to drug addicts. One person told me “taking pills is ONE thing, but putting HEROIN in your ARM with an IV? That is ridiculous!”   More people die from a combination of narcotic pills and another type of pill, typically a “benzo” like Valium than do from a heroin overdose (I.E. Oxycontin).

I don’t know what the future holds for my husband, or, for that matter, for me. But every day I remind him that God loves him, and I love him. We tell each other every day. Though we did that before he got sick, it resonates even louder now, because I could, in reality, be counting down the days that I get to hear his voice, and see his chest rise and fall, knowing he IS breathing, as I do so often.

Please consider being an organ donor.  There are so many people suffering like this, and putting their best foot forward to patiently wait for their turn. My husband, I believe, is the most patient “patient” that Beth Israel Hospital has ever had.

-0-

After three years on the waiting list, Peter and Ashley are considering looking for a living liver donor.  If you have an interest in helping this couple you may contact them directly on Facebook or leave a message here and I’ll make sure then get it.  Please everyone, if you pray,say one for Peter and Ashley.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Alcohol and Drugs The Organ and Child Killers


Alcoholism and drug abuse have haunted my family for years.  I’ve been in recovery for just about 30 years but I’m not alone in my family.  Anonymity disallows further disclosure but trust me, I know about addiction first hand and even as I write this another family member is suffering and causing suffering.  I hate the disease with every fiber in my body and I know how hard it is to fight it.

Alcohol is a drug. It is no different than heroin or cocaine or Dilaudid or Oxycontin.  They are all addictive drugs and they ruin lives and kill people.  Those are facts.  Here’s another fact.  There is an alcohol and drug abuse epidemic among young people in America today.

Here is some shocking information from the National Center On Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.  And if you are not shocked you should be.  http://www.casacolumbia.org/templates/Home.aspx?articleid=287&zoneid=32

  • Half of college students binge drink and or abuse other drugs and almost a quarter meet medical criteria for alcohol or drug dependence.
  •  Prescription drug abuse is the most rapidly increasing drug abuse among teens.
  • Each day more than 13,000 children and teens take their first drink
  • 7 million (26 percent) of public school students age 12-17 say their school is both gang and drug infected.
  • Teens who see their parents drunk are more than twice as likely to get drunk in a month and three times likelier to use marijuana and smoke cigarettes
  • In 2009 more than one third of teens (8.7 million) said they can get prescription drugs to get high within a day and nearly one in five said they could get them in an hour.

Now, you may ask yourself why a blog about organ donation and transplantation is focusing on alcohol.  The answer is simple.  Alcohol can and does destroy human organs.  If Americans could better control their alcohol consumption the number of people who need organ transplants would drop considerably.  Here are just a few of the effects of prolonged alcohol and drug abuse:’

  • The brain —  confusion and memory loss.  Changes in sensation and numbness.
  • Scarring of the liver called cirrhosis which can lead to death.
  • Disease of the pancreas and stomach even stomach cancer
  • Heart irregularities and weakening leading to death (my alcoholism could have contributed to my need for a heart transplant).
  • Upset the body’s natural control of blood fats and blood sugar levels.
  • Bone thinning called osteoporosis
  • Kidney disease

Long-term use of alcohol and drugs in excessive quantities is capable of damaging nearly every organ and system in the body.

Now, back to the epidemic amongst our youth.  Let’s just focus on alcohol.  Underage drinkers account for 11.4 percent of all the alcohol consumed in the U.S., according to Teen Tipplers: America’s Underage Drinking Epidemic, a report released by The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.

The report found that more than five million high schoolers (31 percent) say they binge drink at least once a month. The gender gap in alcohol consumption that for generations separated girls and boys has disappeared among younger teens: male and female ninth graders are just as likely to drink (40 percent vs. 41 percent) and to binge drink (22 percent vs. 20 percent), the news release said.

But let’s not depend on just once source.  Here’s what the National Institute On Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) says about young teens and alcohol and the related risks.

“For young people, alcohol is the drug of choice. In fact, alcohol is used by more young people than tobacco or illicit drugs. Although most children under age 14 have not yet begun to drink, early adolescence is a time of special risk for beginning to experiment with alcohol.

While some parents and guardians may feel relieved that their teen is “only” drinking, it is important to remember that alcohol is a powerful, mood-altering drug. Not only does alcohol affect the mind and body in often unpredictable ways, but teens lack the judgment and coping skills to handle alcohol wisely. As a result:

  • Alcohol-related traffic crashes are a major cause of death among young people. Alcohol use also is linked with teen deaths by drowning, suicide, and homicide.
  • Teens who use alcohol are more likely to be sexually active at earlier ages, to have sexual intercourse more often, and to have unprotected sex than teens who do not drink.
  • Young people who drink are more likely than others to be victims of violent crime, including rape, aggravated assault, and robbery.
  • Teens who drink are more likely to have problems with school work and school conduct.
  • The majority of boys and girls who drink tend to binge (5 or more drinks on an occasion for boys and 4 or more on an occasion for girls) when they drink.
  • A person who begins drinking as a young teen is four times more likely to develop alcohol dependence than someone who waits until adulthood to use alcohol.

The message is clear: Alcohol use is very risky business for young people. And the longer children delay alcohol use, the less likely they are to develop any problems associated with it. That’s why it is so important to help your child avoid any alcohol use.

So you say, “Ok, but what can I do about it. If kids want to drink they’ll find a way.”  And you are right.  But often one of the ways they find to drink is through family members.  Over 70% of eighth graders say alcohol is easy to get and 30% of children age 12-14 get alcohol from a family member.

It’s also wise to use some common sense and remember that as parents you are role models. Your drinking habits are closely observed by your children whether you  think so or not.

There is help and advice from many sectors…SAMSHSA for one (SAMSHSA is the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the U.S. Government.)  http://underagedrinking.samhsa.gov/  Hers’ what they say.

Between the ages of 9 and 13, children start to think differently about alcohol. Many children begin to think underage drinking is OK and some even start to experiment. It’s never too early to talk to your children about alcohol, and encourage them to talk with you.  Over 70% of children say parents are the leading influence in their decision to drink or not.

Lots of little talks are more effective than one “big talk.”

Sitting down for the “big talk” about alcohol can be intimidating for both you and your child. Try using everyday opportunities to talk – in the car, during dinner, or while you and your child are watching TV. Having lots of little talks takes the pressure off trying to get all of the information out in one lengthy discussion, and your child will be less likely to tune you out.

When you do talk about alcohol, make your views and rules clear.

Take the time to discuss your beliefs and opinions about alcohol with your child. Be honest and express a clear, consistent message that underage drinking is unacceptable. When they feel that you’re being real and honest with them, they’ll be more likely to respect your rules about underage drinking.3

Family, peers, school, and the community all play a role in your child’s decision to drink. In fact, most children who use alcohol get it from a friend or family member.1 To ensure these people become positive role models for your child, let them know how you feel about underage drinking.

I have always contended that the best way to solve the organ shortage is to live healthier lives.  That means we have to start at a very early age.  Parents must teach their children about drugs and alcohol as soon and as often as possible.  If we don’t get a handle on this problem every other problem we have in our society will get worse.

Bob Aronson, a 2007 heart transplant recipient is the founder of Facebook’s 1700 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the writer of these donation/transplantation blogs on Bob’s Newheart.  

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

 Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have a PowerPoint slide show for your use free and for use without permission.  Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions.  This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

%d bloggers like this: