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Reflections — What I learned in My First 75 years


By Bob Aronson

cartoonIntroduction

I turn 75 on the 17th of February 2014.  That birthday brings with it mixed emotions and a flood of memories.  Most people I know have one or two birthdays in their lifetime that stand out and have a more lasting effect.  I’ve had three; when I turned 21 for obvious reasons; when I turned 50 and now this one, 25 years later.

Age 50 made me feel as though I had climbed the mountain and on the way had accomplished all that I had set out to do in life.  I stood at the summit and saw no new challenges or goals only a life of sameness and boredom.  I had no idea what was ahead but I somehow felt the excitement of life was over and that I was like a rudderless ship in storm tossed waters.  For the first time in my life I was without goals and therefore without ambition.  It was a horrifyingly depressing feeling. Recovery came only after I awakened one morning scolded myself, adjusted my attitude and set new goals.  That is when I realized 50 was just a number — not a sentence or a punishment.

25 years later I look back and realize that when I turned 50 in1989 there was a whole new life ahead of me. It was to be mixed with success, tragedy, love and a new lease on life, but in 1989 50 was only a number. Birthdays are really quite meaningless because their real significance can only be known when viewed from the future.

That means that age 75 has no meaning yet either.  It, too, is just a number.  As I approach it I feel more emotionally and intellectually alive than ever. Physically I am limited by some of the issues that affect a man of my years but for the most part I am able to do what my lifestyle demands.  If there is a change from 25 years ago it is that I reflect more on the past.  When younger I lived life and never looked back. Now I thoughtfully examine my history seeking to find reasons for my choices and what I learned as a result.  I wish I had done that earlier because having an awareness of what you’ve learned can eliminate the repetition of life’s errors.

Most notable about every birthday in the last six years is the fact that I can celebrate it only because a stranger somewhere in South Carolina decided to be an organ donor. I got his heart in 2007 without which I would have expired years ago.

The heart saved my body but my wife Robin saved my life and my sanity.  robinShe took care of me both pre and post-transplant in times where I was near death’s door, depressed and despondent.  My extended illness could not have been easy for her but despite having to move to a new city, run two businesses and take care of me her disposition never changed and her concern for my well-being never flagged.

Robin made life worth living and because of her care and love, attention and encouragement I was restored and alive again.  Her compassion, concern, optimism and good humor are contagious and I know that with her by my side nothing is impossible.  She captured my old heart and also its replacement.  I am the recipient of blessings that far exceed what I deserved.  Her influence gave me the courage and the will to heal and to develop new interests and skills and today I am a newer and I hope better person than I was.

Turning 75 is a watershed moment, a turning point of sorts when one must admit despite powerful internal forces of denial that “elderly” is a more than apt description.  I am older than the “old men” of my youth but younger than many of my friends.  I feel good, I don’t feel old nor do I think that I think old — but my body sends different signals than does my mind resulting in confusing messages being received by the control centers of my brain. “Get up and run” results in “rise slowly and shuffle.”

Early one morning, as the coffee maker gurgled and steamed and some new aches and pains emerged in new places, I put my arthritic fingers on the keyboard and the following is what magically appeared on the screen. I don’t pretend that what I wrote is particularly profound or even new but, it is what I was thinking at 4 AM on one particular day.

When you are young you should enjoy, appreciate and savor every delicious drop of life.  It is so incredibly short.  There should be no room for pessimism only joy, adventure. success and the pleasure derived from helping others.

When You Are Young, When You Are Old

bu Bob Aronson

cocoonWhen you are young your dreams have eons of time to develop and emerge from the warm confines of their incubator cocoons.  And – the dreams never die, they gently morph into something better and more spectacular.

 ·    

     When you are young you are limited only by the infinity of your imagination.  Nothing is impossible, unhealthy or fatal.  When you are young you are immortal, impervious to harm.

      When you are young “time” is but an insignificant word with no power to limit your possibilities.stopped clock

 ·  The tick and tock of life’s relentless clock is muted while the hands lie almost paralyzed and motionless pointing not to hours or minutes or seconds but rather to eternity. When you are young.

 ·    In the early spring of life you own the world with no thought given to losing those you love because time is not a factor and death is not yet part of living.

 ·    When you are young the effects of time are not visited upon our minds or bodies. As with a good wine or cheese,  aging for the young is gentle and enhances the flavor of life.

·       And when you are young you know you will see the future but it is many calendars away and you have confidence that everything will be better. 

·       When you are young the future is distant and is yours and it abounds with opportunity but…

 ·     When you are old it is seconds away – each experience is a future lived while awaiting the next.

flowersWhen you are old the future is now.  Each new day is a realization of yesterday’s future and the measurement of the quality of life is based on being remembered by those you hold dear.

·       When you are old each new day is a victory, each step a record, each breath a miracle, and each new pain is but a pinch to remind you that life still exists within these bones.

        When you are old you wonder if your life had meaning, If you helped not hindered, if you made a positive mark somewhere on someone – if the people who count still care.

·      When you are old you think about old more often than the young think about youth because senior bodies send some not so simple reminders like pain and…

·       Unlike the young who dream of blissful futures and of unbelievable opportunity the elderly think mostly about what has been, who they were and if they made a difference.

·      When you are young you meet challenges with a determination to overcome them, “your way.”  I might have been far more successful had I taken advantage of the knowledge of those who preceded me who had already invented that wheel.

 ·     When you are old you are free from the stress of wondering what will you be question marksand where you will go. You already know.

 ·     When you are old you are filled with gratitude for your many blessings and a joy for life’s victories already accomplished and you can celebrate again and again.

 ·     When you are old you are eager to share knowledge gleaned from profound life experiences but age and lack of title denies us access to settings where our thoughts can be heard and recognition is often given posthumously — I would rather hear it. 

 ·    When you are old your chest swells with pride when you think of your children and grands and great grands and you hope that someday, when they reflect that you are to them what they are to you. 

      When you are old you desperately miss those you love who live in distant places and you try to assuage the pain with memories and images and anticipation of the next contact.  Nothing is more important than family and close friends….nothing.

 ·      When you are old you achieve a wisdom gained from facing and defeating adversity and of creating and tasting success but all too often the wisdom is left unshared because no one sought to hear it.

·       One_hand animated clock fast  When you are old, you think about time and those paralyzed hands that have been miraculously cured and now speed past the numbers in a frantic race toward —-what?  When you are old.

    And — finally, when you are gone they will speak with great emotion and affection about your fine qualities and contributions.  Words of high praise will be offered by those who mourn your loss.  Words never spoken aloud in the presence of the dearly departed.   Why?

 -0-

Bob Aronson is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder and primary Bob_Aronson at Mayo Jax tight shot 2008-01-30DJH--02author of the blogs on this site and the founder of Facebook’s over 3,000 member Organ Transplant Initiative group.

Now retired and living in Jacksonville, Florida with his wife Robin he spends his time advocating for patients with end stage diseases and for organ recipients.  He is also active in helping his wife with her art business at art festivals and on her Rockin Robin Prints site on Etsy. 

Bob is a former journalist, Governor’s Communication Director and international communications consultant.

A Funny Bone Transplant


We are nearing the holidays.  Thanksgiving is comming up, followed by Christmas, Las Posadas, Hanukkah , Boxing day, Kwanzaa and the new year, 2013.

It is a time when we should be winding down a littl.  A time when we shrug off the trials and tribulations of the past months and find reason to refelect on the good things in life, those special events and words that make you smile.

In a complete break with the long standing Bob’s Newheart tradition of providing only serious information, I thought that perhaps we could all use a little humor in our lives.  I’m hoping that this list of questions will bring a smile to your face and lighten your step just a bit and if you laugh out loud, that’s even better.  Feel free to share this with anyone on your holiday smile list.

This list of questions was sent to me by a friend.  If I knew who the author was I would certainly give him or her credit.

 

QUESTIONS THAT HAUNT ME!

Can you cry under water?
How important does a person have to be before they are considered assassinated instead of just murdered?
Why do you have to ‘put your two cents in’… but it’s only a ‘penny for your thoughts’? Where’s that extra penny going?
Once you’re in heaven, do you get stuck wearing the clothes you were buried in for eternity?
Why does a round pizza come in a square box?
What disease did cured ham actually have?
How is it that we put man on the moon before we figured out it would be a good idea to put wheels on luggage?
Why is it that people say they ‘slept like a baby’ when babies wake up like every two hours?
If a deaf person has to go to court, is it still called a hearing?
Why are you IN a movie, but you’re ON TV?
Why do people pay to go up tall buildings and then put money in binoculars to look at things on the ground?
Why do doctors leave the room while you change?   They’re going to see you naked anyway…
Why is ‘bra’ singular and ‘panties’ plural?
Why do toasters always have a setting that burns the toast to a horrible crisp, which no one would eat?
If Jimmy cracks corn and no one cares, why is there a stupid song about him?
If the professor on Gilligan’s Island can make a radio out of a coconut, why can’t he fix a hole in a boat?
Why does Goofy stand erect while Pluto remains on all fours?   They’re both dogs!
If Wile E. Coyote had enough money to buy all that ACME crap, why didn’t he just buy dinner?
If corn oil is made from corn, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, what is baby oil made from?
If electricity comes from electrons, does morality come from morons?
Do the Alphabet song and Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star have the same tune?
Why did you just try singing the two songs above?
Why do they call it an asteroid when it’s outside the hemisphere, but call it a hemorrhoid when it’s in your butt?
Did you ever notice that when you blow in a dog’s face, he gets mad at you,   but when you take him for a car ride, he sticks his head out the window?
Why, Why, Why
Why do we press harder on a remote control when we know the batteries are getting dead?
Why do banks charge a fee on ‘insufficient funds’ when they know there is not enough money?
Why does someone believe you when you say there are four billion stars, but check when you say the paint is wet?
Why do they use sterilized needles for death by lethal injection?
Why doesn’t Tarzan have a beard?
Why does Superman stop bullets with his chest, but ducks when you throw a revolver at him?
Why do Kamikaze pilots wear helmets?
Whose idea was it to put an ‘S’ in the word ‘lisp’?
If people evolved from apes, why are there still apes?
Why is it that no matter what color bubble bath you use the bubbles are always white?
Is there ever a day that mattresses are not on sale?
Why do people constantly return to the refrigerator with hopes that something new to eat will have materialized?
Why do people keep running over a string a dozen times with their vacuum cleaner, then reach down, pick it up,  examine it, then put it down to give the vacuum one more chance?
Why is it that no plastic bag will open from the end on your first try?
How do those dead bugs get into those enclosed light fixtures?
Why is it that whenever you attempt to catch something that’s falling off the table you always manage to knock something else over?
In winter why do we try to keep the house as warm as it was in summer when we complained about the heat?
How come you never hear father-in-law jokes?
And my FAVORITE………
The statistics on sanity is that one out of every four persons are suffering from some sort of mental illness. Think of your three best friends — if they’re okay, then it’s you.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Human Organs From Pigs — But You’d Have to Kill One to Get One.


What if we could end the organ shortage tomorrow and everyone on the list could get a transplant within a few weeks?  Would you be willing to endorse this new source of organs?  If the source were a pig would you be willing to kill it to save your own life?

Xenotransplantation is the process of transplanting organs from animals into humans and historically that hasn’t worked too well. The human immune system immediately and violently attacks organs from animals and even our most powerful immunosuppressant drugs are ineffective but scientists are working on the problem because if we could use animal organs (ethical questions aside for now) we could end the organ shortage almost immediately.

The answer may lie in raising transgenic animals – animals that carry genes from other species or in the case of humans, animals that have been genetically modified so that their organs are transplantable into human beings.

According to www.actionbioscience.org  Transgenic animals are not a pipe dream either, they are already being produced.  The majority has been mice but scientists have also produced rabbits, pigs, sheep, and cattle. The primary question is not if we can raise pigs to produce organs for humans but when that is likely to happen and it’s possible it could happen relatively soon.  In Korea scientists have already cloned a genetically altered pig with hopes of using its organs in humans but that has, to my knowledge, not yet been done successfully.

There are distinct medical applications to the process of transgenics and providing a ready supply of transplantable organs is one of them.  Presently there is a single protein that can cause rejection but researchers think they can eliminate that problem in the not too distant future by replacing it with a human protein.  It is also possible that animals could be raised to be disease resistant which would benefit both the animal and humans to which some animal diseases can cross.

Pigs are currently thought to be the best candidates for organ donation. The risk of cross-species disease transmission is decreased because of their increased phylogenetic distance from humans. They are readily available, their organs are anatomically comparable in size, and new infectious agents are less likely since they have been in close contact with humans through domestication for many generations.

Aside from growing organs for transplantation, milk producing animals are desirable, too, because they can be used to producenutritional supplements and pharmaceuticals.   Products such as insulin, growth hormone, and blood anti-clotting factors may soon be or have already been obtained from the milk of transgenic cows, sheep, or goats. Research is also underway to manufacture milk through transgenesis for treatment of debilitating diseases such as phenylketonuria (PKU), hereditary emphysema, and cystic fibrosis.

So, yes, there are great possibilities with transgenic animals but there are also ethical concerns that must be addressed.  For example:

  • Should there be universal protocols for transgenesis?
  • Should such protocols demand that only the most promising research be permitted?
  • Is human welfare the only consideration? What about the welfare of other life forms?
  • Should scientists focus on in vitro (cultured in a lab) transgenic methods rather than, or before, using live animals to alleviate animal suffering?
  • Will transgenic animals radically change the direction of evolution, which may result in drastic consequences for nature and humans alike?
  • Should patents be allowed on transgenic animals, which may hamper the free exchange of scientific research?

Animals like pigs offer hope for the thousands of people languishing on the national transplant list.  Unfortunately these things take time and while scientists and then politicians and bureaucrats investigate the possibilities thousands will die waiting for organs.  The altruistic system that we have in place in America just isn’t enough.  We must do more to save the lives of those who need organs.  Hope lies in xenotransplantation, regenerative medicine, therapeutic cloning and artificial organ development.  We must keep that hope alive by support these efforts.

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.

Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.

If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show; it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.

Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

Critical Information On Managing Your Medications


Reprinted and reformatted from WikiHow

With Additions by Bob Aronson

Have you just started a new medicinal regimen that requires you to take pills every day? Remembering to take your medication every day can be a chore, but it is also very important for your health. If you’re forgetful or simply have too many medications to track, then maybe this guide can help you remember to get the job done.

Start using a calendar. You can purchase a paper calendar and hang it in your room and teach yourself to look at it every day, making and leaving notes accordingly. You can also search through free electronic calendars on the Internet or use calendar software that may have come with your computer. Some of these allow you to add notes and automatically send you reminders by email or by SMS (i.e. text messaging).

Set visual reminders.

  • Put the medication close to something you need to deal with on a daily basis anyway. For example, if you take your medication in the morning, make sure that before going to bed at night, you place it next to the coffee pot, if you make coffee in the morning. Or, you can attach your medication bottle or pill box to your toothbrush with Velcro.
  • Make it part of your routine. If you take it every morning, make it a habit to take it as soon as you step out of the shower, or as soon as you get out of bed.
  • You can purchase sticky notes to leave in your kitchen, your car, or anywhere that you frequently visit. For medication that is stored in the fridge, you should paste a post-it note on the fridge door (or on your coffee pot) that says Take Pills.
  • Remember medication that needs to be taken with a meal, by keeping it right on the table, in front of the place that you eat.
  • If you are on your computer often, you might create a text file on your desktop that contains a list of things that you need to do. You can search the Internet for “electronic” sticky notes that you can place directly on your desktop, rather than purchasing paper ones. These programs will often allow you to set timers and reminders directly to the notes to flash or emit sounds accordingly.
  • If you have a complex regimen, write a list with the medication, time and date and tape the list to the mirror in your bathroom. You can also print this on a grid and check off each medication after you take it.
  • Set an auditory reminder. This is a common and fairly effective way to remind yourself to take your medicine. Most cell phones have an alarm function that allows you to set a “daily” alarm time where it rings. Choose a tone that will remind you that you need to take your medicine. If you do not own a cell phone, you might set your alarm clock to go off at a particular time each day for the same effect. Another alternative is to buy a digital watch and set the alarm to go off as many times per day as you need to take medication. A small digital kitchen timer with a numeric keyboard can be useful. Be sure to get one that can be set for hours, not just minutes and seconds. As soon as the alarm goes off, immediately take your medication to reinforce the habit. Saying “Oh, I’ll do it in a few minutes” can lead to repeated forgetfulness and defeat the purpose of having an alarm.
  • Sort your medication. Place all your medications, including your daily dose of vitamins on your kitchen counter. As you take one pill, close the bottle, and place it to the left of the counter, making two piles. Do the same for each pill you take. Remember that the ones you need to take are in front of you. The ones you have already taken are to the left of you. After you are finished taking all your pills for the day, place all those on the left hand side back into the kitchen cabinet. Now you will know that all of your pills have been taken. Pre-sorting the pills into a plastic container designed for this purpose (a pill box or medicine box) is another way to avoid taking the same medication twice by accident. If that compartment is empty, you know you took the meds. Pill sorters come in different sizes and different colors. Aim to have enough to sort two weeks of meds at a time.
  • Adopt a “divide and conquer” strategy. In other words, take half of your medicine and keep it in a place other than your household, such as your office at work. If you happen to forget to take your medicine in the morning, you can easily access your medicine at work.
  • Be mindful of your medicine’s storing conditions, especially if you plan to keep your pills in your car’s glove box on a hot summer day.
  • Get another person to remind you. Have a friend or loved one to remind you to take your medicine, or to ask you if you remembered to take your medicine.

Tips

  • Use your phone calendar to set recurring reminders daily. It’s a more subtle way to be reminded. If you use your company phone/Outlook, make sure you mark the appointment as “private” and keep the reminder description generic to protect your privacy

Be careful when deciding on reminders. If you get too comfortable with them (such as a note on your fridge or by your pill box) you may be more likely to overlook it or ignore it.

  • Not all medication is available or legal in all countries so you should check ahead. Any medication that may have a controlled substance may not be allowed in some countries so make sure you bring your prescription bottle and if possible a photocopy of your physician’s prescription.
  • If you choose to set an alarm on your cell phone, be sure that it is a tone that you can easily associate with taking your medicine, so that you do not become too accustomed to hearing a soft tone. Or, if all else fails, set it to the same tone as your normal ring tone.
  • Remember to take your medication with you when you go on holiday. When you pack your toothbrush, pack the medications you take also.  IMPORTANT!  NEVER CHECK MEDICATION WITH YOUR BAGGAGE.  ALWAYS KEEP YOUR MEDS WITH YOU IN CASE YOUR BAGGAGE GETS LOST.
  • If on vacation, pack your original, pharmacy-labeled medication bottles or keep a detailed list in your purse or wallet.  I have attached a sample list to the end of this blog.
  • Your meds list should also include critical medical information like insurance, physicians and clinics, and medical conditions. If it happens that you need emergency medical care, this will help the care providers to quickly determine what medications you take and how and why you take them, should you not be able to remember them or not speak for yourself. It is difficult, time-consuming and sometimes impossible for health care providers to identify unlabeled pills. For the same reason, do not dump different medications into the same bottle.
  • Before you go on a long vacation, ask your doctor to give you an extra prescription for your pills, so that if you run out, lose them, or spill them, you can have the prescription filled at any drugstore.
  • If you are taking medication for a serious condition such as heart disease, wear a Medical Alert tag, necklace or bracelet listing the name(s) of your illness and the medications you use to treat it/each. Also list any potentially hazardous interactions and allergies.
  • If one or more of your medications causes photo sensitivity, be sure to put on sunscreen before leaving your house, no matter what it looks like outside; you’d be surprised how little light is required to get a full-blown sunburn!

Warnings

  • Be mindful of making a mental note to yourself when you take your medicine. Forgetting to take your medication is one thing, doubling your dosage because you forgot that you’d already taken your medication for today is another. You could make a box next to your “Remember Pills”-note, tick it off when you’ve taken it.
  • If you do forget to take a dose, read the instructions that come with your medication carefully. Don’t assume that you should take your dose anyway- although this is the case for most, it can be different for others. If you have trouble reading, ask the pharmacist to explain the dosage directions.
  • Before leaving the pharmacy, check to make sure that the pills in the bag are the pills that you use. Pharmacists make mistakes also.
  • When leaving your medicine bottles around to remind you to take them, be careful if you have children so you do not leave the pills in a easy spot for a child to grab.
  • Be aware that certain prescription medications have a high potential for addiction or abuse. If you find yourself taking more of a medication than prescribed, call your doctor immediately to talk about the change.
  • Some medications, such as those classed as controlled substances, may not be appropriate to leave around the house. Place them in a locked cabinet, box or drawer, and do not move them from one building to the next. Try to not let others know that you are on such medications and avoid taking them in public. It’s not uncommon for people to steal certain medications, either to abuse themselves or to sell to others with similar intent.
  • It’s a Federal offence to transfer a controlled substance to anyone other than the person to whom it was prescribed (you). If you do wind up victim of a theft, report it immediately to avoid potential prosecution.
  • Some medications have ‘black box warnings’. This means that when taken incorrectly, or by those with certain conditions, fatalities may arise. Place these and other such medications in a safe location and call your doctor right away if you think you might have accidentally taken more than prescribed.
  • Sometimes the pharmacist gives out a stranger’s prescriptions by accident, read the label carefully.

Sample Medical Info Sheet to Carry With You

HEART TRANSPLANT RECIPIENT

Best Hospital USA

Immunosuppressed

John Doe

Birth date 2-17-1950

9180 orchard lane anycity, USA

Home 555-555-5555  Cell phone 555-555-5555

SS # 555-55-5555 Spouse; Jane Doe; Cell phone 555-555-5555

Physicians:

Primary, Dr.Sawbones Anycity USA

Transplant Pulmonologist,  Dr. Breatheasy best clinic USA

Transplant Cardiologists, Dr. Heartthump best clinic USA

Transplant Coordinator:  Nurse Jane best clinic USA

Pharmacy: 

Primary:  Best Pharmacy USS

Secondary: Second best pharmacy USA

Health insurance:

Primary Medicare part A, Hospital, part B, Medical

Secondary, AARP Medicare Supplement .  

Medicare part D Prescriptions, AARP Medicare RxEnhanced

Allergies:Penicillin, cats, all seafood/fish, mold, dust. 

Blood Type: B Positive

Heart related medications

  • Anti-rejection Cyclosporine 200 mg  twice a day
  • Anti-rejection — Cellcept  1000 mg twice a day
  • Anti-cholesterol — Prevastatin 20 mg once a day
  • Blood Thinner – Aspirin 81 mg once a day
  • Blood Pressure – Amlodipine Besylate 5 mg twice a day

Other medications

  • Reflux – Omeprozole  (Prilosec) two 40 mg twice a day
  • Thyroid — Levothyroxine .088 MG once a day  (upon arising)
  • Asthma – ProAir albuterol  rescue inhaler as needed
  • COPD – Foradilinhale one capsule twice a day
  • COPD – Spiriva inhale one capsule once a day (upon arising)
  • Depression-Remeron  7.5 –mg once a day-

Supplements

—  Calcium – 600 mg tablet with Vitamin D twice a day

—  Multi-vitamin– one tablet once a day

Medical conditions

  • Asthma, hay fever, allergies diagnosed 1941
  • Non-smoker
  • COPD diagnosed October 2000
  • Restless leg syndrome diagnosed 1996
  • Chronic lower back pain

Surgeries

  • Heart transplantBest Hospital 
  • Anywhere USA August 2007
  • Cholecystectomy 1994
  • Total left knee replacement 1998

Bob Aronson of Bob’s Newheart is a 2007 heart transplant recipient, the founder of Facebook’s nearly 2,500 member Organ Transplant Initiative and the author of most of these donation/transplantation blogs.

  • You may comment in the space provided or email your thoughts to me at bob@baronson.org. And – please spread the word about the immediate need for more organ donors. There is nothing you can do that is of greater importance. If you convince one person to be an organ and tissue donor you may save or positively affect over 60 lives. Some of those lives may be people you know and love.Please view our video “Thank You From the Bottom of my Donor’s heart” on http://www.organti.org This video was produced to promote organ donation so it is free and no permission is needed for its use.If you want to spread the word personally about organ donation, we have another PowerPoint slide show for your use free and without permission. Just go to http://www.organti.org and click on “Life Pass It On” on the left side of the screen and then just follow the directions. This is NOT a stand-alone show, it needs a presenter but is professionally produced and factually sound. If you decide to use the show I will send you a free copy of my e-book, “How to Get a Standing “O” that will help you with presentation skills. Just write to bob@baronson.org and usually you will get a copy the same day.Also…there is more information on this blog site about other donation/transplantation issues. Additionally we would love to have you join our Facebook group, Organ Transplant Initiative The more members we get the greater our clout with decision makers.

 

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